Diary of a Superfluous Band

Diary of a Superfluous Band

5.0 1
by Mary Elizabeth Martin
     
 
Diary of a Superfluous Band is a hopeful tale of perseverance in the face of failure that brings the reader on a vicarious journey through the dark, beer-drenched underbelly of the punk rock world. This is an eye-opener for anyone who has ever dreamed of joining a band and hitting the road.

Author Biography: Mary Elizabeth Martin, born in Chicago and raised in

Overview

Diary of a Superfluous Band is a hopeful tale of perseverance in the face of failure that brings the reader on a vicarious journey through the dark, beer-drenched underbelly of the punk rock world. This is an eye-opener for anyone who has ever dreamed of joining a band and hitting the road.

Author Biography: Mary Elizabeth Martin, born in Chicago and raised in and around the United States, is a writer and self-appointed obscure music expert who has spent the last decade meeting and infiltrating various bands and music scenes. Though not a groupie per se, Ms. Martin has gone so far as to spot a guitar player in a music video, develop a crush, determine to meet and marry him — then do so. She spent three life-altering years in Berlin, Germany as a result. Ms. Martin's first novel, Diary of a Superfluous Band, is a manifestation of her infatuation with music, musicians, life's dark side and any perceived underdog.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738853871
Publisher:
Xlibris Corporation
Publication date:
12/28/2000
Pages:
293
Product dimensions:
5.52(w) x 8.54(h) x 0.80(d)

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Diary of a Superfluous Band 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One thing authors can do to pull you into their story, is include you--the Reader. Ms. Martin does a fantastic job of making you feel as if you are there, in the time and the moment, visiting places you can only dream of. The book's packaging is simple, but only brilliant writers can get away with that, for Diary doesn't need elaborate art to draw you in, just words. Ms. Martin describes touring as '...a morbid fascination at the site of a disaster...' Her poetic license in her use of words is clearly well-earned. Pick up this book if you want to go on a long, strange and maddenly wonderful journey in the world of rock stars, roadies, groupies, sex, drugs and punk rock. Do the crime without paying the time--Ms. Martin does it for you. Visit places most likely unknown to you and see them through the eyes looking from behind not-so-rose-tinted lens. And for those of you fantasizing about that career on the road, playing in a band, let this book open your eyes for you. Now that I am finished with the book, the questions still lingers: Is it real?