Diary of a Worm
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Diary of a Worm

4.5 31
by Doreen Cronin, Harry Bliss
     
 

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One small worm . one big world!

This is the diary . of a worm. This worm lives with his parents, plays with his friends, and even goes to school. But unlike you or me, he never has to take a bath, he gets to eat his homework, and because he doesn't have legs, he just can't do the hokey pokey – no matter how hard he tries.

This hysterical picture

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Overview

One small worm . one big world!

This is the diary . of a worm. This worm lives with his parents, plays with his friends, and even goes to school. But unlike you or me, he never has to take a bath, he gets to eat his homework, and because he doesn't have legs, he just can't do the hokey pokey – no matter how hard he tries.

This hysterical picture book by New York Times bestselling author Doreen Cronin and New York Times bestselling illustrator Harry Bliss tells the daily doings of a small worm in a gigantic worm world.

Ages 4–8

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
In Diary of a Worm, Doreen Cronin, the author of Click, Clack, Moo, teams up with Harry Bliss, a New Yorker cartoonist. They sprinkle tiny clods of digestible earthworm facts onto a happy wormworld that children will find reassuring, even alluring. — Bryn Barnard
Publishers Weekly
Cronin's beguiling journal entries by a worm who can write are as witty and original as the missives from her popular cows who can type (Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type). With his red baseball cap and good-natured humor, the titular hero is a winning American Everyboy, and young readers will identify with his escapades in part because they mirror their own. Bliss's (A Fine, Fine School) clever endpapers feature photos of the worm on his first day of school and on a family vacation to Compost Island, as well as his report card (he gets an "A" for tunnel, a "Pass" for Squirming). He makes his friend Spider "laugh so hard, he fell out of his tree," and he tells his sister that "her face will always look just like her rear end." But in addition to being like the hero, youngsters will also enjoy seeing their familiar world from a worm's vantage point. "It's not always easy being a worm," he says. One of the bad things is that a worm can't chew gum; one of the good things is that worms never get cavities (they have no teeth, he points out). At a school dance, a line of worms does the hokey pokey, putting their heads in and out and turning themselves about ("That's all we could do"). Bliss's droll watercolor illustrations are a marvel. He gives each worm an individual character with a few deft lines, and the varying perspectives and backgrounds enhance the humor of the text (especially a view from the sidewalk up, illustrating "Hopscotch is a very dangerous game," with a girl's sneakers about to descend). Inventive and laugh-out-loud funny, this worm's-eye view of the world will be a sure-fire hit. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Our worm hero is introduced on the cover, writing the diary that is the text. His prize photos and mementos are taped into the end papers. With his jaunty baseball cap, he is far more than the average worm. In entries from March to August, our narrator has adventures with family, friends, and hopscotch players, goes to school, learns lessons and wisdom from his family, does an unforgettable "hokey pokey," and puts in some good words for ecology. He's a real charmer with a sense of humor. Bliss's cartoon characters in context tickle our funny bones. A bed is made from an empty tea bag carton, the worm youngsters sit around mushroom tables, one worm has a scraggly beard. Designed mainly as vignettes, the illustrations emphasize the actions in the variety of the worm's experiences through the days, similar in many ways to those of human youngsters. 2003, Joanna Cotler Books/HarperCollins Publishers, Ages 4 to 8.
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-A down-to-earth invertebrate comments on friendship, family life, school, and his place in the universe. An amusing worm's-eye view of the world, with a tongue-in-cheek text and wry illustrations. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Each turn of the page will bring fresh waves of giggles as a young worm records one misadventure after another. He tries to teach his arachnid friend how to dig a tunnel; learns the peril of hanging out on a sidewalk during a game of hopscotch; suffers a nightmare from eating too much garbage before bedtime; makes a one-piece macaroni necklace in art class; earns a parental reprimand for telling his older sister that "no matter how much time she spends looking in the mirror, her face will always look just like her rear end," and much, much more. Bliss gives this limbless young diarist a face and an identifying red cap, adds plenty of sight gags, and just to set the tone, plasters (painted) snapshots on the endpapers captioned "My favorite pile of dirt," "My report card" ("Needs to resist eating homework"), etc., etc. Readers will come away with the insight that worms may not be so good at walking upside down or doing the Hokey Pokey, but they do play an important role in taking care of the Earth. Not so different from us, after all. (Picture book. 6-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060001506
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/31/2003
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
39,334
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 10.94(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
AD360L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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