Diary of an Anorexic Girl

( 21 )

Overview

Morgan Menzie takes readers through a harrowing but ultimately hopeful and inspiring account of her eating disorder. Her amazing story is told through the journals she kept during her daily struggle with this addiction and disease. Her triumphs and tragedies all unfold together in this beautiful story of God's grace.

Features include: daily eating schedule, journal entries, prayers to God, poems, and what she wished she knew at the time. It's ...

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Overview

Morgan Menzie takes readers through a harrowing but ultimately hopeful and inspiring account of her eating disorder. Her amazing story is told through the journals she kept during her daily struggle with this addiction and disease. Her triumphs and tragedies all unfold together in this beautiful story of God's grace.

Features include: daily eating schedule, journal entries, prayers to God, poems, and what she wished she knew at the time. It's the true story of victory over a disease that is killing America's youth.

A young girl keeps a diary recording her struggles with anorexia.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780849944055
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/16/2003
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 196
  • Sales rank: 484,523
  • Age range: 13 - 18 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.64 (w) x 8.66 (h) x 0.52 (d)

Meet the Author

Morgan Menzie is a student at Vanderbilt University. She served as general editor for Sisterhood, and Diary of an Anorexic Girl is her first full-length novel. She was valedictorian of her high school class and now she's majoring in English. She has written for The Tennessean, and was editor of yearbook and literary magazine in high school. Morgan lives in Nashville, Tennessee in a cool apartment with some college friends.
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Read an Excerpt

This is ridiculous really. I don't know who I think is going read this, but I feel encouraged when an audience is listening.

Mom always says I have a flare for the dramatics. It's usually derogatory, but in my infinite wisdom I have turned it in to a motto for life. You have to admit-if you were real you'd want me to talk to you directly. I would hate to exclude, so rather than risk hurting feelings real or imaginary, I will include you in my narrative. Mom also says I over-analyze things, but I don't think so at all and since you are my imaginary audience I have decided that you absolutely agree with me.

My grandpa gave me this journal and told me to start it today. Why, I don't know. Old people always have their reasons. He made the leather cover with my initials in the corner-in case you can't see it for yourself. He's from the country, or used to be before he moved to be closer to us, so homemade gifts are his specialty. I can't tell you how many tables and chests and shelves with pegs to hang keys on we've collected over the years. I suppose being from the country or the city for that matter would give your life color-you know that thing they always use in literature classes to analyze novels. (It's the point at which the author gets slammed. You raise your hand to say that you rather like the New England setting of The Cider House Rules only to be bull-dozed by the question of "Yes, but does it have color?" There's no true answer to that question, which I rather like, but which those teachers stubbornly refuse to acknowledge.) All I know is, I would rather be any place in any one of those novels than here in mindless suburbia, growing up then growing old in obscurity.

Mom says I take life too seriously. She says I'm only twelve years old and that I shouldn't worry about such matters. I say I've already had twelve years to warm up and I am ready to go. Pa always understood me. He didn't tell me what to do or remind me of how young I am.

All he said was, "Blythe, I want you to have this to write your life down in."

That's it; that's all he said before he began to whistle some old twangy hymn. For a man who could talk the bark off a tree, this was an abruptly short conversation, and perfectly suited for me.

So left with no guidance, here goes . . .

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First Chapter

This is ridiculous really. I don't know who I think is going read this, but I feel encouraged when an audience is listening.

Mom always says I have a flare for the dramatics. It's usually derogatory, but in my infinite wisdom I have turned it in to a motto for life. You have to admit—if you were real you'd want me to talk to you directly. I would hate to exclude, so rather than risk hurting feelings real or imaginary, I will include you in my narrative. Mom also says I over-analyze things, but I don't think so at all and since you are my imaginary audience I have decided that you absolutely agree with me.

My grandpa gave me this journal and told me to start it today. Why, I don't know. Old people always have their reasons. He made the leather cover with my initials in the corner—in case you can't see it for yourself. He's from the country, or used to be before he moved to be closer to us, so homemade gifts are his specialty. I can't tell you how many tables and chests and shelves with pegs to hang keys on we've collected over the years. I suppose being from the country or the city for that matter would give your life color—you know that thing they always use in literature classes to analyze novels. (It's the point at which the author gets slammed. You raise your hand to say that you rather like the New England setting of The Cider House Rules only to be bull-dozed by the question of "Yes, but does it have color?" There's no true answer to that question, which I rather like, but which those teachers stubbornly refuse to acknowledge.) All I know is, I would rather be any place in any one of those novels than here in mindless suburbia, growing up then growing old inobscurity.

Mom says I take life too seriously. She says I'm only twelve years old and that I shouldn't worry about such matters. I say I've already had twelve years to warm up and I am ready to go. Pa always understood me. He didn't tell me what to do or remind me of how young I am.

All he said was, "Blythe, I want you to have this to write your life down in."

That's it; that's all he said before he began to whistle some old twangy hymn. For a man who could talk the bark off a tree, this was an abruptly short conversation, and perfectly suited for me.

So left with no guidance, here goes . . .

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2006

    From an anorexic's perspective

    I myself am presently struggling with anorexia. This book made me think about my life as one of worth. Thank you to Morgan Menzie for letting me know that I can get better and I can one day learn to Live.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2006

    cautiously recommended

    While I agree that the book was insightful and real, I would have to warn against passing it around to women with eating disorders, especially those who are currently in treatment. As a woman with anorexia nervosa, I found the book to be highly triggering throughout. So, while I would recommend it, I recommend it with caution of who reads it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2007

    Boring and Silly

    It's not bad writing for a teenager, but after having read Wasted, I was expecting something similar, with more substance and less Jesus. This was just about a girl who flirted with an eating disorder for a while and then prayed about it and was magically cured. Eh.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2006

    Excellent!

    One of the best books I have read in a long time! It was so real that I couldn't put it down. I read it in just one day. You can feel her pain as she struggles and you just want to reach out and help her! Excellent book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2006

    Stunning

    A portrayal of the stark reality of eating disorders. Stunning and real.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2006

    A review from the mother of an anorexic daughter

    Thank you to the author. After reading the book I feel like I have a much greater understanding of what my daughter is going through. My daughter read the book after I did and is passing it around to other patients in her eating disorder program.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2003

    great

    What an amazing read! Very insightful and very down to earth

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2003

    A great insight into what it is like

    ¿Diary of an Anorexic Girl¿ is a novel, but it is based on the author¿s own life and the journal she kept as she struggled and finally succeeded in beating the addiction. I know the intended audience is young adults, but I think adults will gain a lot of understanding from hearing what anorexia is like from someone who has it. The best part of the story is the strength that Blythe draws from her faith in God and how that faith ultimately leads to her triumph. If you are anorexic, or have a family member or friend who is, or simply want to know more about what it is like to have this disorder, this is the book for you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2014

    To Wish I Was 120 lbs

    Hi. My name is Annabeth. I've struggled with an eating disorder since I was your age, and I turn 15 next tuesday. Let me tell you now; that isn't the route to take. I way 104 lbs, but everytime I look in the mirror, I see 150 lbs. I have been in and out of hospitals, I've lost hair, my skin and naiks are yellow, and I have depression because I can't get to my goal weight and I hate myself for it. Try all the normal things: eating right, a lot of fiber, excersize every day. If your family goes out to eat, stick to a chicken salad or something. It fills you up, gives you all the right nutrients, and it is low in carbs and cories. Don't use ranch dressing; use italian or vinagrette, they are much lighter and low in calories. Whatever you do, don't starve yourself, and don't throw up. It starts a cycle that is really really hard to break. I hope this helped.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    Hlb, honest

    Nice to know im not alone

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2012

    Anonymous

    It was a great depiction of the reality of those who suffer from anorexia.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2011

    Not a story, no real depth

    I dont' really recommend this book... I guess it's truely a "diary," but it's definitely not a story and there is no depth to her anorexia. There is so much missing, you hardly know her at the end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2008

    Pretty Amazing

    Diary of an Anorexic Girl by Morgan Menzie was the best fictional novel written in awhile. This book was amazing because it had tons of excitement, suspense, and many things happening that could really happen in real life. <BR/>The setting of this novel was at an everyday high school in America and took place over a course of several years starting in 1994. The major conflict involved the main character, Blythe, struggling with anorexia. Blythe didn¿t know how or want to control her weight loss, which resulted in many complications throughout the novel. Soon after Blythe starts losing weight, her parents send her to a nutritionist, but after her sessions end Blythe still has problems. Although Blythe is having trouble with anorexia, she continues to do well in school and eventually attends a college course, while still in high school. Here, her weight gets dangerously low. Again, her parents enlist for some help, but will Blythe¿s disease ever really go away? The author writes this novel in the form of a journal, so you feel like you¿re in Blythe¿s head and like you know exactly how she¿s feeling. The author also uses many bible excerpts to set the tone of an entry, which was helpful. <BR/>All teenage girls should read this book because it has a lot of things that they could relate to and understand. Also, the style this book was written in made things clearer and unique.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2006

    Breathtaking

    This book was absolutely amazing. I couldn't put it down the whole time that I read it. It was very insiteful and you can really feel her pain. It just makes you want to help her that much more. I love this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2006

    Not the greatest read

    I hate to dissent, but... Maybe it's because I've never had an ED. Maybe it's because the book wasn't written for someone my age. Not sure...all I know is I didn't care for it. The book didn't feel accurate to me in terms of vocabulary, sentence structure, etc. it felt too 'mature' in those respects, as if the author forgot what it was like to be 13. Also, I was expecting a more detailed account of the actual disease and recovery process, but felt I only got the bare minimum. It may have been an honest telling, but it wasn't particularly riveting or revealing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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