Diary of the Gone [NOOK Book]

Overview

Callum writes in a diary to stop the dead haunting him. He has seen them since he hit 9.

When The Blackwells move to the town of Olden Cross, Callum hopes to leave all the dead haunting him behind. But after the disappearance of a boy and his diary, his existence turns into hell.

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Diary of the Gone

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Overview

Callum writes in a diary to stop the dead haunting him. He has seen them since he hit 9.

When The Blackwells move to the town of Olden Cross, Callum hopes to leave all the dead haunting him behind. But after the disappearance of a boy and his diary, his existence turns into hell.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940045285513
  • Publisher: Ivan Amberlake
  • Publication date: 9/15/2013
  • Sold by: Smashwords
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 39,478
  • Age range: 13 years
  • File size: 193 KB

Meet the Author

Ivan Amberlake is an urban/paranormal fantasy writer, member of Breakwater Harbor Books. In December 2009 he began writing his first novel "The Beholder" and in November 2011 it was selected for review by HarperCollins on Authonomy.com.

Ivan Amberlake is in the process of writing Book Two of The Beholder Series called "Path of the Heretic" and a Young Adult Horror/Fantasy called "Diary of the Gone".

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 3, 2013

    I really appreciated that this was a one-off novella and not a n

    I really appreciated that this was a one-off novella and not a new series.  The story had just enough creepiness to make it scary, and at the end was wrapped up neatly.  




    I don't normally read horror or scary books because, well, I get freaked out pretty easily.  But this was just this side of fantasy so that I wasn't really scared so much as wanting to know what was *really* going on with that diary and the dead people that Callum sees.




    The writing was done well, and it seems like the author has gotten a pretty good grasp on dialogue since the last book of his that I read.  I enjoyed the flow and got through it in a couple of hours (hence the novella part).  I was left with a few questions, like why did all the animals leave the forest?  There could have been a bit more done with that in the beginning, when Callum and Nathan find the dead deer in the swamp.  Some of the story felt rushed, but overall it was a good read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 12, 2014

    Amberlake's writing enthralls the reader. He creates concepts an

    Amberlake's writing enthralls the reader. He creates concepts and worlds for his books which are both believable and fantastic, thrilling the mind as we read. I was a huge fan of Amberlake's debut release, The Beholder, and so as I picked up Diary of the Gone I was already anticipating an excellent read. I was well rewarded, and hauntingly rapt in Diary's pages.
    Here we find ourselves in the mind of a boy named Callum in Olden Cross, a town surrounded by misty swampland and the disappearances of his peers. Callum sees the dead. Are they calling to him? What are they searching for? What connection does he have to their ghostly forms? You will have to read to discover the secret past of Olden Cross and the unknown of this place.
    I began Diary of the Gone with the thought that I would read it over the month of October. I soon found I could not put the book down until I reached the end. A haunting work- well plotted and highly enjoyable. I sit in anticipation of Amberlake's next release.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2014

    Diary of the Gone is the second novel I've read by this author;

    Diary of the Gone is the second novel I've read by this author; the first being The Beholder, which was also very good.

    The author, Ivan's, strongest ability is his description. No doubt about that. He has a way with words and manages to set a mood simply by describing the scenery and that's not as easy as it sounds. 

    This novel was creepy, mysterious and original. The idea that the dead visit the main character, Callum, before passing on to the next world is very unnerving. Especially when you're put in his shoes. It's a curse, passed down to him and there are many side stories which connect at the end so you fully understand why things are the way they are. Why he has this ability. Why the swamp came to be, and why it mysteriously grows bigger each year. What happened to the boy who was killed many years ago. Who is kidnapping characters and why. It's a maze of questions and the book constantly keeps you on your toes. 

    Callum is a likable character. He's strong in many ways but also weak in other ways. He's bullied by the principal's son and is quite an introvert. He finds it difficult to talk to girls and the way he reacts, the way he is written, makes it very believable that he is a fifteen year old boy. I enjoyed being in his shoes and following him around.

    The book had a build up of impending doom. You could feel it and it gave you chills. The scenes with the shadows (the dead) visiting Callum while he's writing in his diary to send them away, are very chilling even though very little actually happens. It's the way that it is written that makes you uncomfortable and that just shows the skill of the writer.

    There were a few errors in the novel, such as grammar, but there was also the dialogue, the way it was written, which showed that the author is not a native speaker. I know he plans to fix that anyway, and to be honest, it never deters your enjoyment of the novel; the errors are that minor. 

    I love the cover, even more so than The Beholder's cover. I know the designer of the cover and he did a grand job. It's very eye-catching and quite pretty despite the fact it is ominous. 

    The flow of the plot is smooth and each chapter gives you something new to look forward to. Questions to ask and something to fear. The novel is actually a novella really but it feels a decent size. Everything that needed to be covered, is. 

    I recommend this book to anyone who likes mystery, urban fantasy and spooky stories. It isn't graphic but it is a little dark. Plus the twist near the end is definitely worth waiting for. 

    I preferred this novel to The Beholder, just because I liked how creepy it was. It was simple, short and sweet, with decent, well-formed characters; the mystery was well concealed and not predictable- I didn't guess what the twist was and I'm fairly good at that. It was just an enjoyable novel, and an interesting concept. I liked it a lot. So because I liked it a little bit more than Ivan's other novel, it has to get a higher mark. I gave The Beholder 4.5 out of 5.

    It only makes sense that this should get full marks. FIVE OUT OF FIVE STARS!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2013

    A great MG-YA novella with elements of horror, supernatural, mys

    A great MG-YA novella with elements of horror, supernatural, mystery and fantasy. Callum Blackwell is our MC and he's a likeable character in the sense that he appears to be weak inside and out. But he mans up to face both outside events and also his visions of the dead. There are secrets in his family which, to his dismay, he's bound to unveil unknowingly, while one by one his friends are lost from sight for days. Recommended to readers from 14-21 who are fond of supernatural-themed novellas.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 25, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Fresh, Magnetic, Darkly Haunting

    Looking for something fresh on your reading menu? How about something haunting with a side of dark adventure and an order of mystery? For dessert, how do dark secrets topped with deadly revelations sound? Don’t worry about the calories, the cardio factor will pump up your metabolism just fine.
    Ivan Amberlake’s Diary of the Gone is dark, urban fantasy at its best! Young teen, Callum, is an average fifteen year-old boy, a little awkward, sometimes spewing some attitude and trying to come to terms with having moved to the small town of Olden Cross. What separates Callum from his peers is that he is haunted by the dead. Only his diligent writing in his secret diary seems to put the ghosts to rest in his mind, that is, until an adventure into the woods surrounding Olden Cross becomes a living nightmare he may never escape. Teens are going missing and ghosts are pleading with Callum for help and his diary goes missing. With help from unlikely sources and a determination to stop theses grisly deaths, Callum finds himself coming face to face with crazed evil from his past and his last chance to save innocents from their vile fate. Is Callum up to facing a challenge that would crush the spirit of a full-grown warrior?

    Have you read anything by Ivan Amberlake? The man can create an atmosphere that is bleak and foreboding with just a stroke of his pen. You find yourself cringing and tensing as you’re sucked into the dark vortex of his tale. Think roller coaster traveling at hyper speeds through a black tunnel. You had the scare of your life, but you get back in line to go again, because you find yourself addicted to the thrill. Callum is the typical teen, from his dialogue to his actions, seriously who else would run headlong into danger? Mr. Amberlake’s world is so well-defined, you are more than a spectator, you are part of the story, feeling every chill, smelling every smell and dealing with the emotional upheaval along with the rest of this fantastic cast. (So if you see someone cowering behind a tree, that would be me, never said I was the hero type, I just love a thriller conjured by a master at their craft.) I highly recommend this walk on the dark side, Young Adults on up!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2014

    HI

    HHHHHHHHHHIIIIIIIIIIII!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2013

    This is a young adult horror story

    115 pages, some grammer and editing problems, but not too bad. This is mostly written in first person, then the author seems to forget that and throws in a few lines or paragraphs of third person. It is of the horror/ suspense/ paranormal genre. The novel is about young people between the ages of 14-16. The plot bounces around a bit and at times it seems as if the author comes up with a different idea, before he is finished with the one he started writing first. This makes a choppy read. I would classify this as a young adult book. There a few damns here and there, some gore and violence and quite a few murdered kids, but nothing extremely graphic. Towards the end, the story seemed rushed as if the author was in a hurry to finish, as if he was running out of ideas. I think YA ages 13-16 would like this short novel. It seems too juvenile for older readers. Overall, it was not a bad read.

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    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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