Did Adam And Eve Have Navels?

( 4 )

Overview

"[Gardner] zaps his targets with laserlike precision and wit."—Entertainment Weekly

Martin Gardner is perhaps the wittiest, most devastating unmasker of scientific fraud and intellectual chicanery of our time. Here he muses on topics as diverse as numerology, New Age anthropology, and the late Senator Claiborne Pell's obsession with UFOs, as he mines Americans' seemingly inexhaustible appetite for bad science. Gardner's funny, brilliantly unsettling exposés of reflexology and ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$20.09
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$22.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (25) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $14.00   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?: Debunking Pseudoscience

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$22.95 List Price

Overview

"[Gardner] zaps his targets with laserlike precision and wit."—Entertainment Weekly

Martin Gardner is perhaps the wittiest, most devastating unmasker of scientific fraud and intellectual chicanery of our time. Here he muses on topics as diverse as numerology, New Age anthropology, and the late Senator Claiborne Pell's obsession with UFOs, as he mines Americans' seemingly inexhaustible appetite for bad science. Gardner's funny, brilliantly unsettling exposés of reflexology and urine therapy should be required reading for anyone interested in "alternative" medicine. In a world increasingly tilted toward superstition, Did Adam and Eve Have Navels? will give those of us who prize logic and common sense immense solace and inspiration. "Gardner is a national treasure...I wish [this] could be made compulsory reading in every high school—and in Congress."—Arthur C. Clarke "Nobody alive has done more than Gardner to spread the understanding and appreciation of mathematics, and to dispel superstition."— The New Criterion, John Derbyshire

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Entertainment Weekly
[Gardner] zaps his targets with laserlike precision and wit.
Arthur C. Clarke
Gardner is a national treasure...I wish [this] could be made compulsory reading in every high school—and in Congress.
New Criterion
Nobody alive has done more than Gardner to spread the understanding and appreciation of mathematics, and to dispel superstition. —John Derbyshire
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393322385
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/2001
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 1,230,813
  • Product dimensions: 0.79 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 8.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Martin Gardner (1914-2010) is the author of more than seventy books, including Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science, The Annotated Alice, The Annotated Hunting of the Snark, and The Colossal Book of Mathematics.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
Part I Evolution vs. Creationism
    1. Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?
    2. Phillip Johnson on Intelligent Design
Part II Astronomy
    3. Near-Earth Objects: Monsters of Doom?
    4. The Star of Bethlehem
Part III Physics
    5. The Great Egg-Balancing Mystery
    6. Zero-Point Energy and Harold Puthoff
    7. David Bohm: The Guided Wave
Part IV Medical Matters
    8. Reflexology: To Stop a Toothache, Squeeze a Toe!
    9. Urine Therapy
Part V Psychology
    10. Freud's Flawed Theory of Dreams
    11. Post-Freudian Dream Theory
    12. Jean Houston: New Age Guru
Part VI Social Science
    13. Is Cannibalism a Myth?
    14. Alan Sokal's Hilarious Hoax
    15. The Internet: A World Brain?
    16. Carlos Castaneda and New Age Anthropology
Part VII UFOs
    17. Claiborne Pell, Senator from Outer Space
    18. Courtney Brown's Preposterous Farsight
    19. Heaven's Gate: The UFO Cult of Bo and Peep
Part VIII More Fringe Science
    20. Thomas Edison, Paranormalist
    21. What's Going On at Temple University?
Part IX Religion
    22. Isaac Newton, Alchemist and Fundamentalist
    23. Farrakhan, Cabala, Baha'i,and 19
    24. The Numerology of Dr. Khalifa
    25. The Religious Views of Stephen Jay Gould and Darwin
    26. The Wandering Jew
    27. The Second Coming
Part X The Last Word
    28. Science and the Unknowable
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2002

    To Correct the Record: Gardner's misquotes and distortions

    Half Truths (Suppressed Evidence): Any statement usually intended to deceive that omits some of the facts necessary for an accurate description. <p> I agree it is good to debunk bogus pseudo-science. At the same time, I think most people would agree that in any critique being factually accurate, fair, and honest to context is important; and therefore, when quoting, summarizing, and paraphrasing from an original source one should do so accurately, fairly, and in context to assure one does not distort the original sources meaning in any way by adding or subtracting from it. <p> In Did Adam and Eve Have Navels on page 42 Gardner states (my emphasis): ¿On page 1352 of the Urantia Book we learn that the Jupiter-Saturn encounter of May 29, 7 B.C., gave the appearance of a single star, which we know it didn't, and this accounts for what the supermortals call the 'beautiful legend' that grew up about the 'Star.'¿ <p> Later Gardner refers to the Star of Bethlehem as a legend or beautiful myth, and states on page 44: <p> ¿In my not-so-humble opinion, the story of the Star is pure myth, similar to many ancient legends about the miraculous appearance of a star to herald a great event, such as the birth of Caesar, Pythagoras, Krishna (the Hindu savior), and other famous persons and deities.¿ <p> As the full quotation of the paragraph below shows, this is essentially what the paragraph in question in the Urantia Book is saying; that there was no Star of Bethlehem, it was only a myth, a legend, albeit a beautiful one, and that ancient man was ¿continually spinning such beautiful myths about the lives of their religious leaders and political heroes.¿ <p> The actual and complete paragraph in the Urantia Book states: ¿These wise men saw no star to guide them to Bethlehem. The beautiful legend of the star of Bethlehem originated in this way: Jesus was born August 21 at noon, 7 B.C. On May 29, 7 B.C., there occurred an extraordinary conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces. And it is a remarkable astronomic fact that similar conjunctions occurred on September 29 and December 5 of the same year. Upon the basis of these extraordinary but wholly natural events the well-meaning zealots of the succeeding generation constructed the appealing legend of the star of Bethlehem and the adoring Magi led thereby to the manger, where they beheld and worshiped the newborn babe. Oriental and near-Oriental minds delight in fairy stories, and they are continually spinning such beautiful myths about the lives of their religious leaders and political heroes. In the absence of printing, when most human knowledge was passed by word of mouth from one generation to another, it was very easy for myths to become traditions and for traditions eventually to become accepted as facts.¿ (Urantia Book 1352) <p> Gardner's statement above implies that the Urantia Book claims ¿the Jupiter-Saturn encounter of May 29, 7 B.C., gave the appearance of a single star¿¿ This is false and a distortion of the actual paragraph¿s meaning. The first sentence in the paragraph states clearly ¿These wise men saw no star to guide them to Bethlehem.¿ Nowhere in the paragraph in question is it stated that the Jupiter-Saturn encounter gave the appearance of a single star. I searched the online version of the Urantia Book and could find no statement that the Jupiter-Saturn conjunction ¿gave the appearance of a single star.¿ This appears to indicate that Gardner has misquoted the Urantia Book by adding information that was not in the original source and omitting information, the first sentence of the paragraph in question, which contradicts his own fallacious statement. Gardner then goes on to use his own false statement as a basis upon which to criticize the Urantia Book, by stating ¿which we know it didn¿t.¿ I fail to see how this erroneous quotation, which falls short of even minimal accuracy and fairness, furthers the cause of reason or scienc

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    Gardner said the Urantia Book was a cult because it talked about

    Gardner said the Urantia Book was a cult because it talked about Jesus and God. How would he know ?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    BECOME A CRITICAL THINKER

    I read Did Adam and Eve Have Navels when it came out... He blasts PSEUDO SCIENCE... This will sharpen your critical thinking skills... His writing has always sharpened mine.

    THINK logic and common sense. Help us shoot down Americans' inexhaustible appetite for bad science.

    MARTIN STILL HAD IT. I read Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science by Martin Gardner back in my teens. It gave me a basis to judge some new claim or study in science. It is THE classic on scientific skepticism.

    I say again READ THIS BEFORE YOU ACCEPT ANYTHING FROM SOME EXPERT...
    hint... hint... what ever that current topic is





    MARTIN GARDNER... 1914 - 2010 A REAL POLYMATH RIP


    My thoughts are with you and yours.

    Thank you... I found Mr Gardner's Scientific American column back in high school. It was tough waiting for the next month, so I was going back in old issues and getting his books on so many topics... from magic... to Lewis Carroll & Alice in wonderland plus advanced math topics

    I thank you for feeding my multiple interests... I strive to be a fraction of the renaissance man that you are

    I found about his formal education much later. "His mathematical writings intrigued a generation of mathematicians, but he never took a college math course. " My respect increased even more.

    I recently found out he edited Humpty Dumpty pushing his influence far further back than I ever realized.





    RESOURCES:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Gardner


    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/24/us/24gardner.html

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2004

    Awesome

    This book was a fantastic read! The very curious title, DID ADAM AND EVE HAVE NAVELS?, grabbed my attention. I truly enjoyed the insight offered in this book. Give it a go. You never know what you might gain from the experience.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)