The Dietitian's Guide To Vegetarian Diets / Edition 3

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Overview

Feature
  • Expanded counseling points provide a summary of key practical information in each chapter - useful for students who are trying to decide what is most important to focus on.
  • Discussion questions/case studies are included in this edition - can be used by instructors or for independent student projects.
  • More charts and tables have been incorporated into the text to provide useful and accessible summaries of information.
  • A very common area of interest is vegetarian diets for infants, children, teens, and pregnant and lactating women. This edition features chapters on each of these life-cycle stages and provides both the latest research as well as practical suggestions for key sources of nutrients and for menu planning.
  • Includes a food guide that can be used by vegetarians throughout the life-cycle as well as for multiple kinds of vegetarian diets (lacto-ovo, lacto, vegan, etc).
  • Highlights the benefits of using vegetarian diets in the treatment of hyperlipidemia, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and overweight.
  • Features soy and health and soy safety.
  • Includes preparation techniques for foods commonly used by vegetarians - chapter on preparing grains and beans, replacing eggs in cooking, and using soy products as well as a glossary of vegetarian foods.
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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE (University of Chicago Medical Center)
Description: This guide to vegetarian diets is meant to be used as an aid in counseling vegetarian clients and those interested in becoming vegetarian. The second edition was published in 2004, making this a welcome update that covers the most up-to-date issues.
Purpose: The purpose is to give dietetics professionals the information they need to effectively counsel individuals of all ages on the vegetarian diet. This book meets the objectives, giving detailed information regarding vegetarian nutrition throughout the life cycle.
Audience: The book is written for anyone who will be counseling individuals on vegetarian nutrition, but it assumes readers already have a thorough knowledge of nutrition. Dietetics professionals are the most appropriate audience, but students who have already taken several nutrition classes would benefit from this book as well. The authors are very involved in the Vegetarian Resource Group, which disseminates accurate vegetarian nutrition information, and also have contributed numerous research articles on the subject.
Features: Four sections cover the subject: an overview, components of vegetarian nutrition, vegetarianism and the life cycle, and practical implications. The overview provides a good history of vegetarianism as well as a helpful table of the different types of vegetarian diets. The chapter devoted solely to soy foods goes into great detail with numerous tables. One particular table includes all the types of soy foods and the classifications of isoflavones in each of them. Half of this chapter is devoted to chronic disease prevention and treatment with soy, touching upon the research that proves and disproves the benefits of soy in various comorbidities. The section on controversies with isoflavones is particularly helpful, especially since many patients ask questions about soy and breast health or its effect on the thyroid. Another chapter is devoted to vegetarian diets and the adolescent. Of particular benefit are the counseling points at the end of this chapter, along with other tips in every chapter devoted to the life cycle. The appendixes give in-depth information regarding nutrient intakes at all age levels along with lipid and blood pressure levels of vegetarians compared to nonvegetarians. While the book is not visually stimulating, the text is very detailed and well referenced.
Assessment: This is an excellent resource on vegetarian nutrition. While it would be the most helpful to dietetics professionals, it also is an excellent primer for those who already have a good nutrition knowledge base and are interested in learning more about vegetarian nutrition.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE(University of Chicago Medical Center)
Description: This guide to vegetarian diets is meant to be used as an aid in counseling vegetarian clients and those interested in becoming vegetarian. The second edition was published in 2004, making this a welcome update that covers the most up-to-date issues.
Purpose: The purpose is to give dietetics professionals the information they need to effectively counsel individuals of all ages on the vegetarian diet. This book meets the objectives, giving detailed information regarding vegetarian nutrition throughout the life cycle.
Audience: The book is written for anyone who will be counseling individuals on vegetarian nutrition, but it assumes readers already have a thorough knowledge of nutrition. Dietetics professionals are the most appropriate audience, but students who have already taken several nutrition classes would benefit from this book as well. The authors are very involved in the Vegetarian Resource Group, which disseminates accurate vegetarian nutrition information, and also have contributed numerous research articles on the subject.
Features: Four sections cover the subject: an overview, components of vegetarian nutrition, vegetarianism and the life cycle, and practical implications. The overview provides a good history of vegetarianism as well as a helpful table of the different types of vegetarian diets. The chapter devoted solely to soy foods goes into great detail with numerous tables. One particular table includes all the types of soy foods and the classifications of isoflavones in each of them. Half of this chapter is devoted to chronic disease prevention and treatment with soy, touching upon the research that proves and disproves the benefits of soy in various comorbidities. The section on controversies with isoflavones is particularly helpful, especially since many patients ask questions about soy and breast health or its effect on the thyroid. Another chapter is devoted to vegetarian diets and the adolescent. Of particular benefit are the counseling points at the end of this chapter, along with other tips in every chapter devoted to the life cycle. The appendixes give in-depth information regarding nutrient intakes at all age levels along with lipid and blood pressure levels of vegetarians compared to nonvegetarians. While the book is not visually stimulating, the text is very detailed and well referenced.
Assessment: This is an excellent resource on vegetarian nutrition. While it would be the most helpful to dietetics professionals, it also is an excellent primer for those who already have a good nutrition knowledge base and are interested in learning more about vegetarian nutrition.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE(University of Chicago Medical Center)
Description: This guide to vegetarian diets is meant to be used as an aid in counseling vegetarian clients and those interested in becoming vegetarian. The second edition was published in 2004, making this a welcome update that covers the most up-to-date issues.
Purpose: The purpose is to give dietetics professionals the information they need to effectively counsel individuals of all ages on the vegetarian diet. This book meets the objectives, giving detailed information regarding vegetarian nutrition throughout the life cycle.
Audience: The book is written for anyone who will be counseling individuals on vegetarian nutrition, but it assumes readers already have a thorough knowledge of nutrition. Dietetics professionals are the most appropriate audience, but students who have already taken several nutrition classes would benefit from this book as well. The authors are very involved in the Vegetarian Resource Group, which disseminates accurate vegetarian nutrition information, and also have contributed numerous research articles on the subject.
Features: Four sections cover the subject: an overview, components of vegetarian nutrition, vegetarianism and the life cycle, and practical implications. The overview provides a good history of vegetarianism as well as a helpful table of the different types of vegetarian diets. The chapter devoted solely to soy foods goes into great detail with numerous tables. One particular table includes all the types of soy foods and the classifications of isoflavones in each of them. Half of this chapter is devoted to chronic disease prevention and treatment with soy, touching upon the research that proves and disproves the benefits of soy in various comorbidities. The section on controversies with isoflavones is particularly helpful, especially since many patients ask questions about soy and breast health or its effect on the thyroid. Another chapter is devoted to vegetarian diets and the adolescent. Of particular benefit are the counseling points at the end of this chapter, along with other tips in every chapter devoted to the life cycle. The appendixes give in-depth information regarding nutrient intakes at all age levels along with lipid and blood pressure levels of vegetarians compared to nonvegetarians. While the book is not visually stimulating, the text is very detailed and well referenced.
Assessment: This is an excellent resource on vegetarian nutrition. While it would be the most helpful to dietetics professionals, it also is an excellent primer for those who already have a good nutrition knowledge base and are interested in learning more about vegetarian nutrition.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763779764
  • Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
  • Publication date: 9/24/2010
  • Edition description: 3
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 596
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Part I AN OVERVIEW OF VEGETARIAN DIET 1

Chapter 1 Demographics and Definitions 3

History of Vegetarianism 3

Profile of Vegetarians 5

Types of Vegetarian Diets 6

Chapter 2 Health Consequences of Vegetarian Diets 13

Differences in Dietary Components of Vegetarian and Nonvegetarian Diets 14

Cardiovascular Disease 15

Hypertension 24

Cancer 27

Diabetes 33

Obesity 34

Kidney Disease 35

Renal Stones 37

Gallstones 38

Diverticular Disease 38

Other Conditions 39

Part II VEGETARIAN NUTRITION 63

Chapter 3 Protein 65

Historical Perspective on Protein Needs 65

Protein Intake 67

Protein Quality 68

Plant Proteins and Nitrogen Balance 74

Protein Complementarity 75

Protein Needs of Vegetarians 77

Counseling Points: Protein 79

Chapter 4 Fats 84

LA and ALA 84

Arachidonic Acid 89

EPA and DHA 89

Endogenous Synthesis of Long-Chain PUFA 93

Enhancement of Vegetarian DHA and EPA Status 94

Would Vegetarians Benefit from Eating Fish? 98

Conclusion 99

Counseling Points: Meeting Needs for Key Fats 99

Chapter 5 Calcium 108

Calcium and Bones 108

Calcium Absorption 110

Calcium Excretion 111

Protein Effects on Calcium Excretion 111

Protein-Calcium Interactions 113

Sodium and Calcium Balance 116

Diet and Bone Health: Implications for Vegetarians 117

Bone Health of Vegetarians 118

Meeting the Calcium Accepted Intake on Plant-Based Diets 119

Conclusion 124

Counseling Points: Calcium 125

Chapter 6 Minerals 136

Phytate and Mineral Bioavailability 136

Iron 138

Zinc 148

Selenium 153

Copper 156

Magnesium 157

Phosphorus 158

Maganese 160

Iodine 160

Sodium 163

Chloride 163

Potassium 164

Fluoride 164

Chromium 166

Molybdenum 166

Counseling Points: Iron and Zinc 166

Counseling Points: Iodine 167

Chapter 7 Vitamins 179

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) 179

Thiamin (Vitamin B1) 192

Riboflavin 194

Niacin 195

Vitamin B6 196

Folate 199

Biotin 200

Pantothenic Acid 202

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) 202

Vitamin D 204

Vitamin A 209

Vitmain E 211

Vitamin K 214

Chapter 8 Phytochemicals 230

Phytochemicals, Secondary Metabolites, and Phytoalexins 234

History of Phytochemicals 234

Classifying Phytochemicals 235

Phytochemicals: Mechanisms of Action 236

Phytochemical Intake 239

Practical Implications 240

Chapter 9 Soyfoods 249

Isoflavones 250

Asian Soy Intake 255

Nutritional Composition of Soybeans and Soyfoods 256

Chronic Disease Prevention and Treatment 263

Controversies 270

Intake Recommendations 275

Chapter 10 Food Guides for Vegetarians 290

A History of Food Guides 290

Developing Food Guides for Vegetairans 291

Food Guide Groupings 294

Part III VEGETARIAN DIETS THROUGHOUT THE LIFE CYCLE 299

Chapter 11 Pregnancy and Lactation 301

Energy Needs and Weight Gain in Pregnancy 301

Meeting Nutrient Needs of Pregnancy on a Vegetarian Diet 303

Meal-Planning Guidelines 310

Use of Soy Products in Pregnancy 311

Vegetarian Multivitamin-Mineral Supplements 312

Adolescent Pregnancy 312

Potential Complications of Pregnancy 313

Common Conditions of Pregnancy 314

Vegetarians and Lactation 316

Counseling Points for Vegetarian Pregnancy 322

Counseling Points for Vegetarian Lactation 322

Chapter 12 Vegetarian Diets in Infancy 332

Growth in Vegetarian Infants 332

Vegetarian Diets During the First 6 Months of Infancy 333

Solid Foods for Vegetarian Infants 338

Supplements for Older Infants 341

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children and Vegetarian Families 341

Comparison of Sample Menu Plans for 9-Month-Old Vegan and Omnivore Infants 343

Potential Concerns in Infant Feeding 343

Macrobiotic Diets in Infancy 346

Conclusion 347

Counseling Points for Parents of Vegetarian Infants 347

Chapter 13 Preschool and School-Age Children 352

Growth of Vegetarian Children 352

Diets of Vegetarian Children 353

Nutritional Assessment 360

Guidelines for Meal Planning for Vegetarian Children 361

Milk in the Diets of Vegetarian Children 362

Soy in the Diets of Vegetarian Children 364

Counseling Parents of Vegetarian Children 364

Meals at School 369

Counseling Points for Parents of Vegetarian Children 371

Chapter 14 Vegetarian Diets for Adolescents 377

Adolescent Eating Habits 377

Growth of Vegetarian Adolescents 378

Nutrient Needs of Vegetarian Adolescents 379

Meal-Planning Guidelines for Vegetarian Adolescents 384

Nutrition-Related Concerns in Adolescents 386

Counseling Points for Vegetarian Adolescents and Their Parents 390

Chapter 15 Vegetarian Diets for Older People 397

Dietary Status of Older Vegetarians 397

Nutrient Needs of Older Vegetarians 398

Nutritional Factors Affecting Cognitive Function 403

Meal Planning for Older People 403

Factors That Affect Food Choices 404

Sample Menus for Older Vegetarians 407

Counseling Points for Older Vegetarians 408

Part IV PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS 415

Chapter 16 Carbohydrates, Fat, and Chronic Disease 417

Glycemic Index 417

Diabetes 419

Cardiovascular Disease 422

Metabolic Syndrome 424

Weight Control 425

Counseling Vegetarians with Chronic Disease 427

Chapter 17 Vegetarian Food Preparation 440

Preparing Grains 440

Preparing Beans 440

Using Tofu 443

Using Textured Vegetable Protein 444

Using Egg Substitutes 445

Cooking with Sweeteners 446

Glossary of Vegetarian Foods 447

Resources on Vegetarian Diet 451

Appendixes 455

Index 583

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