Different Just like Me

( 2 )

Overview

People come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and colors. The appealing blend of colorful acrylic figures and pencil backgrounds highlights the underlying message of this story--the visual differences between people are striking, but by looking beyond that, we see how similar we really are. Full-color illustrations.

While preparing for a visit to her grandmother, a young girl notices that, like the flowers in Grammie's garden, people who are different from one another ...

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Overview

People come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and colors. The appealing blend of colorful acrylic figures and pencil backgrounds highlights the underlying message of this story--the visual differences between people are striking, but by looking beyond that, we see how similar we really are. Full-color illustrations.

While preparing for a visit to her grandmother, a young girl notices that, like the flowers in Grammie's garden, people who are different from one another also share similarities and it's okay to like them all the same.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
No youngster will miss the belabored message of Mitchell's first children's book: though people are different from one another in some ways, basically they are alike. Young April comes to this conclusion as she rides a bus with two children who communicate in sign language, watches a blind woman reading Braille numbers next to an elevator and washes her hands in a rest room alongside a woman in a wheelchair. The author stretches her concept thin with several examples, among them a man beside her at a lunch counter who orders the same meal as hers. Oddly, after painstakingly spelling out how each person is different yet simultaneously the same as Alice, in two examples Mitchell pointedly sidesteps the issue of race. Mitchell's art presents another curiosity: though she opens and closes with finely detailed full-color scenes, in the remaining illustrations only the people appear in full color, against black-and-white backgrounds. While the visual effect may focus readers' attention on the individuals in question, kids may well feel cheated--by the absence not only of fully rendered artwork but of a story line as well. All ages. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Judy Katsh
Didactic, but not preachy, this look at human differences and similarities is a gentle introduction to the wide world of humanity. A girl spends a week preparing for a visit to Grammie's house and while running errands, encounters all different kinds of people. There are people who sign, and people who read Braille. There are young people, old people, and people who speak different languages. There are people in a hurry, people in wheelchairs, and people who dawdle while shopping in the market. Each time the girl notices a difference in the people she meets, she also notices a similarity. The refrain of the book is, "...just like me." The illustrations are friendly without being cloying and that's a nice reflection of the book's whole tone as well.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-A sweet dose of bibliotherapy that explores the similarities and differences among people. The story is told from the point of view of a little girl anticipating a visit to her grandmother's house. Every day as she waits, the girl and her mother go on an errand. On each of these trips, the child encounters someone who is different-someone who is either older, speaks another language, has a disability, or is of a different race-but who is doing the same thing she is. Acrylic paints highlight only a few items or people in each of the pen-and-ink illustrations, inviting children to take a closer look while reinforcing the story's point. Tolerance and acceptance are difficult concepts to address for a young audience, and this book does it in a manner that can be applied to a number of situations.-Jane Marino, Scarsdale Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
More of a teaching text, Mitchell's story is really a series of observations, ostensibly by a child, about how people differ and how they are the same.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780881069754
  • Publisher: Charlesbridge Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/28/1999
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 361,345
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.43 (w) x 8.33 (h) x 0.34 (d)

Meet the Author

Lori Mitchell has worked as a freelance designer, illustrator, and teacher ever since graduating with honors from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Lori has spent a lot of time traveling and learning about different cultures and people. She now lives in San Diego with her husband, Dean, and their daughter.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2000

    The Sameness of Differences

    Focusing on the commonality of differences, rather than on differences themselves, is in line with what I teach my own kids, and fosters the notion of unity among people, regardless of appearances, behaviors or beliefs. Lori Mitchell's simple story and enchanting illustrations (realism meets folksy cartoons)serves as a necessary discussion-opener for all families. Every family should have a copy of this story for their young children.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2000

    Promoting Tolerance & Praising Diversity

    When my daughter's classmates starting enquiring about 'her mommy's' skin disorder, this children's book came to my rescue. How often do you find a book that glorifies the remarkable things we have in common and praises the differences that make us unique. Every parent should own a copy of this book!

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