Different Views in Hudson River School Painting

Different Views in Hudson River School Painting

2.0 1
by Judith Hansen O'Toole
     
 

ISBN-10: 0231138210

ISBN-13: 9780231138215

Pub. Date: 06/20/2008

Publisher: Columbia University Press

Hudson River School artists shared an awe of the magnificence of nature as well as a belief that the untamed American scenery reflected the national character.

In this new work, color reproductions of more than 115 paintings capture the beauty and illuminate the aesthetic and philosophical principles of the Hudson River School painters. The pieces included in

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Overview

Hudson River School artists shared an awe of the magnificence of nature as well as a belief that the untamed American scenery reflected the national character.

In this new work, color reproductions of more than 115 paintings capture the beauty and illuminate the aesthetic and philosophical principles of the Hudson River School painters. The pieces included in this volume reflect a period (1825-1875) when American landscape painting was most thoroughly explored and formalized with personal, artistic, cultural, and national identifications. Judith Hansen O'Toole reveals the subtleties and quiet majesty of the works and discusses their shared iconography, the ways in which artists responded to one another's paintings, and how the paintings reflected nineteenth-century American cultural, intellectual, and social milieus.

Different Views is also the first major study to examine closely the Hudson River School artists' practice of creating thematically related pairs and series of paintings. O'Toole considers painters' use of this method to express different moods and philosophical concepts. She observes artists' representations of landscape and their nuanced depictions of weather, light, and season. By comparing and contrasting Hudson River School paintings, O'Toole reveals differences in meaning, emotion, and cultural connotation.

Different Views in Hudson River School Painting contains reproductions of works from a range of prominent and lesser-known artists, including Jasper Francis Cropsey, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Asher B. Durgaand, Frederic Edwin Church, Albert Bierstadt, John Frederic Kensett, and John William Casilear. The works come from a leading private collection and were recently exhibited at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art.

Columbia University Press

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231138215
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
06/20/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
1,392,032
Product dimensions:
9.40(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

PrefaceIntroductionAmerican SceneryDifferent ViewsI. Introductory Pair: Cole and ChurchII. Times of DayIII. Weather Conditions, Atmosphere, and MoodIV. SeasonsV.Nature without ManVI. Man's Activities in Nature: PleasureVII. Man's Impact on Nature: The Machine in the GardenVIII. Interpretations of the Same Scene by Different ArtistsIX. SamplersEndnotesSelected BibliographyList of PaintingsAcknowledgments

Columbia University Press

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Different Views in Hudson River School Painting 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Thomas_S_Rosen More than 1 year ago
I was disappointed in this book. While other books about the Hudson River School educate the reader, this one merely waxed on and on about theories which were unsubstantiated. I got the feeling that the author was almost pretending to be a scholar. The premise was an interesting one. Like Panofsky, who wrote about the iconography of Renaissance paintings, this book promises to do the same about Hudson River School paintings. There is no basis to what the author, Judith O'Toole claims, though, and the book is riddled with disjointed writing and glaring inaccuracies. Also, the author misses the point about nature being a way to achieve spirituality, the very axiom of the Hudson River School belief, when she starts anthropomorphizing trees. Spirituality is supposed to be in nature, not human traits. According to O'Toole, the trees behave much like humans, almost to the point of ridiculousness. The paintings selected for the book are wonderful examples. It's the text that lets the reader down.