Differentiation Through Personality Types: A Framework for Instruction, Assessment, and Classroom Management

Differentiation Through Personality Types: A Framework for Instruction, Assessment, and Classroom Management

by Jane A. G. Kise
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1412917700

ISBN-13: 9781412917704

Pub. Date: 12/05/2006

Publisher: SAGE Publications

Students' learning styles are as unique as their personalities. As a result, the most successful teachers are often those who understand how to adjust their educational techniques to honor students of all intelligences and backgrounds. This comprehensive resource, based on the author's years of research and experience, presents a usable, understandable framework that

Overview

Students' learning styles are as unique as their personalities. As a result, the most successful teachers are often those who understand how to adjust their educational techniques to honor students of all intelligences and backgrounds. This comprehensive resource, based on the author's years of research and experience, presents a usable, understandable framework that assists K-12 teachers in achieving success in today's differentiated classroom.

From easy-to-implement techniques to templates for planning lengthy curriculum units, teachers receive clear direction for appealing to the learning personalities in their diverse classrooms. Readers will also find:

  • Relevant stories, exercises, and examples to illustrate differentiated classroom instruction
  • Balanced advice for improving student growth and performance in small-group work, class discussions, and relationship building
  • Practical ideas and activities for immediate application in the classroom

Discover teaching techniques that result in success for students of all learning styles!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781412917704
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Publication date:
12/05/2006
Pages:
200
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     ix
About the Author     xi
Introduction     1
Why Use Type for Differentiation?     4
Differentiation: Helping Students Find Flow     5
Ability Versus Flow     6
A Framework Grounded in Research     6
Why Personality Type?     7
Conclusion     8
Who You Are Is How You Teach     9
The First Preference Pair: Extraversion and Introversion     11
The Second Preference Pair: Sensing and Intuition     14
The Third Preference Pair: Thinking and Feeling     17
The Fourth Preference Pair: Judging and Perceiving     19
Conclusion     22
What Type Looks Like in Students     23
Type Preferences: What You Might See in Students     24
Type and Learning Disabilities     27
Eight Kinds of Students     29
Case Studies-Using Type for Student Development     38
Using Type to Discover New Strategies for Helping Struggling Students     41
Conclusion     41
Type as a Framework for Differentiation     42
Learning Styles and Differentiation     42
How to Differentiate Without Being Overwhelmed     44
Differentiating a Lesson, Matching Content, Goals, and Learning Styles     49
Differentiation to Help Students Become Comfortable With Each Learning Style     51
Differentiation to Provide Genuine Choices     52
One Last Step: Using Thinking and Feeling to Motivate All Students     54
Conclusion     55
Key Differentiation Strategies     57
Scaffolding Tools: Supporting Thinking     58
Differentiated Choices     64
Heterogeneous Groups     65
Homogenous Groups     67
Natural Patterns for Extensions     67
What About Assessments?     68
Conclusion     72
Differentiated Classroom Management     73
Differentiating the Learning Environment     74
Sources of Classroom Management Problems     74
Why Do Teachers Need to Adjust Their Styles?     75
How to Use This Chapter     76
The Strategies: Extraversion and Introversion     77
Sensing and Intuition     83
Thinking and Feeling     85
Judging and Perceiving     88
Conclusion     92
Differentiated Reading Instruction     93
How Sensing and Intuitive Students Learn to Read      94
Differentiated Strategies for Sensing and Intuition     96
Content Differences in What Students Like to Read     101
Strategies for Differentiation     104
Conclusion     109
Differentiated Writing Instruction     111
Helping Extraverts Get Ready to Write     113
Get Students Started     118
Activities for Both Sensing and Intuition     122
Conclusion     124
Differentiated Math and Science Instruction     125
Type and Math Anxiety     126
Math Anxiety and Elementary Teachers     127
Sensing, Intuition, and Problem Solving     129
Maintaining the Cognitive Demands of the Task     132
Differentiation Strategies     136
Conclusion     142
Differentiating for Students From Other Cultures     143
Type, Multiculturalism, and Schools     144
Type and Culturally Responsive Teaching     146
Type and Other Cultures     148
Work Completion Strategies for Students of Poverty and Other Perceiving Cultures     153
Conclusion     156
Differentiating by Grade Level     158
Kindergarten to Second Grade     158
Third to Fifth Grades      159
The Middle-School Years: Helping Adolescents See Themselves as Students     161
The High-School Years: Helping Teens Make Their First Life Decisions     162
The Type Lessons     163
Quadrant Activities: Positive Experiences in Every Learning Style     165
Type Lessons for Grade 3 Through Adult     168
Resource: Type Terms Bookmark     176
References     177
Index     181

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