Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad

Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad

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by Brett Martin
     
 

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A revealing look at the shows that helped TV emerge as the signature art form of the twenty-first century

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, the landscape of television began an unprecedented transformation. While the networks continued to chase the lowest common denominator, a wave of new shows on cable channels dramatically stretched television’s

Overview

A revealing look at the shows that helped TV emerge as the signature art form of the twenty-first century

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, the landscape of television began an unprecedented transformation. While the networks continued to chase the lowest common denominator, a wave of new shows on cable channels dramatically stretched television’s narrative inventiveness, emotional resonance, and artistic ambition. Combining deep reportage with cultural analysis and historical context, Brett Martin recounts the rise and inner workings of a genre that represents not only a new golden age for TV, but also a cultural watershed. Difficult Men features extensive interviews with all the major players, including David Chase, David Simon, David Milch, and Alan Ball; in addition to other writers, executives, directors and actors. Martin delivers never-before-heard story after story, revealing how cable television became a truly significant and influential part of our culture.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[A] wonderfully reported and thoughtful exploration… Difficult Men is grand entertainment, and will be fascinating for anyone curious about the perplexing miracles of how great television comes to be."
—Wall Street Journal
 
"Martin is a thorough reporter and artful storyteller, clearly entranced with, though not deluded by, his subjects…  In between the delicious bits of insider trading, the book makes a strong if not terribly revelatory argument for the creative process."
—Los Angeles Times
 
"Martin offers sharp analysis of the advances in technology and storytelling that helped TV become the 21st century's predominant art form. But his best material comes from interviews with writers, directors, and others who dish about Weiner's egomania, Milch's battles with substance abuse, and Chase's weirdest acid trip ever."
—Entertainment Weekly
 
"Enjoyable, wildly readable."
—Boston Globe
 
"An engaging, entertaining, and utterly convincing chronicle of television's transformation… Martin operates with an enviable fearlessness, painting warts-and-all portraits of autocratic showrunners such as David Milch (Deadwood), David Simon (The Wire) and Matthew Weiner (Mad Men)… Anyone interested in television should read this book, no matter how much or how little they know about the shows it chronicles."
—Newsday
 
"Difficult Men, with its vigorous reporting and keen analysis, is one of those books that crystallizes a cultural moment and lets you savor it all the more."
—Dallas Morning News
 
"Martin's analysis is intelligent and his culture commentary will be of interest to fans of many of today's better-written shows."
—Christian Science Monitor
 
"Masterful… unveils the mysterious-to-all-but-insiders process that takes place in the rooms where TV shows are written."
—New Orleans Times-Picayune
 
'Difficult Men delivers what it promises. Martin had good access to actors, writers and producers . . . Difficult Men is an entertaining, well-written peek at the creative process."
—Fort Worth Star Telegram
 
 "A vastly entertaining and insightful look at the creators of some of the most highly esteemed recent television series… Martin’s stated goal is to recount the culmination of what he calls the 'Third Golden Age of Television.'  And he does so with his own sophisticated synthesis or reporting, on-set observations, and critical thinking, proving himself as capable of passing judgment, of parsing strengths and weaknesses of any given TV show, as any reviewer who covers the beat… in short, the sort of criticism that must now extend to television as much as it does to any other first-rate art."
—Bookforum
 
"[Showrunners are] as complex and fascinating in Martin’s account as their anti-hero protagonists are on the screen… Breaking Bad, The Shield, and Six Feet Under have dominated the recent cultural conversation in the way that movies did in the 1970s…. Martin thrillingly explains how and why that conversation migrated to the erstwhile 'idiot box.' A lucid and entertaining analysis of contemporary quality TV, highly recommended to anyone who turns on the box to be challenged and engaged."
—Kirkus (starred)
 
"Martin deftly traces TV's evolution from an elitist technology in a handful of homes, to an entertainment wasteland reflecting viewers' anomie, to 'the signature American art form of the first decade of the twenty-first century.'"
—Publishers Weekly
 
"Brett Martin lays out the whole story of TV’s new Golden Age — lucidly and backed by awesome reporting (and TV watching)… Difficult Men delivers the inside story of the creation of these landmark TV shows, along with Martin’s astute take on how these series fit into the larger pop cultural landscape of the early 21st century… If I were you, I’d pre-order this terrific book on my Kindle or Nook. It should be among the most talked-about non-fiction titles of the summer."—ctnews.com

A New Yorker "Book to Watch Out For"
A Vulture "Beach Read"
A Christian Science Monitor "10 Best Books of July"

"This book taught me a thing or two about how a few weird executives enabled a handful of weirder writers to make shows I still can't believe were on TV. But what I found more interesting—and disturbing—is how it helped me understand why an otherwise lily-livered, civic-minded nice girl like me wants to curl up with a bunch of commandment-breaking, Constitution-trampling psychos—and that's just the cops."
—Sarah Vowell, New York Times bestselling author of Unfamiliar Fishes, The Worldly Shipmates, and Assassination Vacation
 
"Aptly titled, and written with verve, humor and constant energy, Difficult Men is as gripping as an episode of The Sopranos or Homeland. Any addict of the new 'golden' television (or extended narratives on premium cable) will love this book. Along the way, it is also one of the smartest books about American television ever written. So don't be surprised if that great creator, David Chase (of The Sopranos), comes out as a mix of Rodney Dangerfield and Hamlet."
—David Thompson, author of The Big Screen and The New Biographical Dictionary of Film
 
"Brett Martin has accomplished something extraordinary: he has corralled a disparate group of flawed creative geniuses, extracted their tales of struggle and triumph, and melded those stories into a seamless narrative that reads like a nonfiction novel. With characters as rich as these, you can't help but reach the obvious conclusion—Difficult Men would itself make one heck of a TV series."
—Mark Adams, New York Times bestselling author of Turn Left at Machu Picchu
 
"The new golden age of television drama—addictive, dark, suspenseful, complex, morally murky—finally gets the insanely readable chronicle it deserves in Brett Martin's Difficult Men. This group portrait of the guys who made The Sopranos, Six Feet Under, The Wire, Deadwood, Mad Men and Breaking Bad is a deeply reported, tough-minded, revelatory account of what goes on not just in the writers' room but in the writer's head—the thousand decisions fueled by genius, ego, instinct, and anger that lead to the making of a great TV show. Here, at last, is the real story, and it's a lot more exciting than the version that gets told in Emmy acceptance speeches."
—Mark Harris, New York Times bestselling author of Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood
 
"Sometime in the recent past the conversation changed. My friends were no longer talking about what movie they'd been to see, but what television show was their latest obsession. Brett Martin's smart and entertaining book illuminates why and how this happened—while treating fans to the inside scoop on the brilliant head cases who transformed a low-brow medium into a purveyor of art."
—Julie Salamon, New York Times Bestselling author of The Devil’s Candy and Wendy and the Lost Boys

For decades, television networks cranked out simple, likable entertainment that seldom rose to the level of art. Then in the late nineties and in the dawn of the new century, cable TV screened dramas that earned high praise even from congenitally skeptical critics. Shows like The Sopranos, The Wire, Mad Men, Breaking Bad, and Six Feet Under broke the mold by tackling the complexities of issues such as love and sexuality, the workplace, gray area ethics, and life and death. Martin Brett's Difficult Men gives us our best view yet of this relatively new celebrated and controversial art form with a combination of history, cultural analysis and extensive interviews with its creators. Among those sharing their insights on the new world that they helped concoct are David Chase (The Sopranos), Matthew Weiner and Jon Hamm (Mad Men), David Simon and Ed Burns (The Wire), David Milch (NYPD Blue; Deadwood) and Alan Ball (Six Feet Under.) A major behind-the-scenes view of breakthrough TV.

The New York Times Book Review - Lisa Schwarzbaum
…a wonderfully smart, lively and culturally astute survey of this recent revolution…
Publishers Weekly
Martin (The Sopranos: The Book) names the period spanning 1999 to 2013 “the third golden age of television,” after those of the 1950s and the 1980s, and shows how it was made possible by a unique moment in entertainment history. The 1980s saw premium cable services with their shorter seasons and the advent of the VCR. The new landscape encouraged developing original programming to help fill 168 hours a week and taking chances with serialized narrative, as opposed to the syndication-friendly stand-alone episodes common in broadcast television. A little later, shows like The Wire, The Sopranos, and Mad Men subverted network formulas to present flawed, even nihilistic antiheros wrestling with inner demons. Over the course of a dozen episodes a season, each show explored such dark themes as addiction, psychotherapy, and failure, and this boundary pushing made them as revolutionary as the very idea of “good television.” Martin’s book recognizes the small-screen auteurs that made it all possible—including Grant Tinker, a television executive whose high regard for writers made the most creative ones flock to him; Steve Bochco, who established the role of autonomous writer/show runner; and frustrated screenwriter David Chase, a TV scribe with a scathing disregard for the medium. Martin deftly traces TV’s evolution from an elitist technology in a handful of homes, to an entertainment wasteland reflecting viewers’ anomie, to “the signature American art form of the first decade of the twenty-first century.” (July)
Wall Street Journal
Difficult Men is grand entertainment, and will be fascinating for anyone curious about the perplexing miracles of how great television comes to be.
Los Angeles Times
Martin is a thorough reporter and artful storyteller, clearly entranced with, though not deluded by, his subjects… In between the delicious bits of insider trading, the book makes a strong if not terribly revelatory argument for the creative process.
Entertainment Weekly
Martin offers sharp analysis of the advances in technology and storytelling that helped TV become the 21st century's predominant art form. But his best material comes from interviews with writers, directors, and others who dish about Weiner's egomania, Milch's battles with substance abuse, and Chase's weirdest acid trip ever.
Boston Globe
Enjoyable, wildly readable.
Newsday
Martin operates with an enviable fearlessness, painting warts-and-all portraits of autocratic showrunners such as David Milch (Deadwood), David Simon (The Wire) and Matthew Weiner (Mad Men)… Anyone interested in television should read this book, no matter how much or how little they know about the shows it chronicles.
Christian Science Monitor
Martin's analysis is intelligent and his culture commentary will be of interest to fans of many of today's better-written shows. "10 Best Books of July"
Dallas Morning News
Difficult Men, with its vigorous reporting and keen analysis, is one of those books that crystallizes a cultural moment and lets you savor it all the more.
New Orleans Times-Picayune
Masterful… unveils the mysterious-to-all-but-insiders process that takes place in the rooms where TV shows are written.
Fort Worth Star Telegram
Difficult Men delivers what it promises. Martin had good access to actors, writers and producers . . . Difficult Men is an entertaining, well-written peek at the creative process.
Library Journal
10/15/2013
Tony Soprano and Don Draper are "difficult men," symbols of what Martin (The Sopranos: The Complete Book) sees as a renaissance in television programming during the past decade. He explains that award-winning cable and pay television dramas such as The Sopranos, The Wire, Mad Men, and Breaking Bad took the viewing experience to a new level: they were edgier and morally ambiguous and had long narrative arcs with flawed antiheroes. Delving behind the scenes into how these programs were created, the author profiles the showrunners—the writer-producers—of these programs, exploring the personalities and sensibilities of these predominantly middle-age writers who are themselves "difficult men." Although Martin dedicates a majority of the book to Sopranos creator David Chase, whom he sees as having paved the way for the increase of creative, quality TV, he also provides interesting studies of Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner, Breaking Bad writer Vince Gilligan, and The Wire showrunner, David Simon. VERDICT A must-read for fans of the shows discussed, aspiring TV writers, and media studies students.—Donna Marie Smith, Palm Beach Cty. Lib. Syst., FL
Kirkus Reviews
The new golden age of television and how we got there. GQ contributor Martin traces the sea change in American television of the past decade and a half, which saw the medium evolve from a repository for numbing mediocrity (with some notable exceptions) to a venue for material that enjoys artistic parity with the best products of film, theater and literature. While the author clearly lays out the financial and technological conditions that made such high-quality, idiosyncratic TV possible--the proliferation of cable stations demanded more content, and more nuanced demographic targeting by advertisers and the relative indifference to ratings enjoyed by subscription channels made niche programming profitable--his real interest is in the protean creators ("showrunners," in industry parlance) who brought highly personal, genre-redefining, boundary-pushing series to the small screen. That's a wise strategy, as they are a singularly compelling group--The Sopranos creator David Chase, pathologically morose and embittered; The Wire's David Simon, the fire-breathing investigative reporter intent on exposing the corruption in American institutions; David Milch, the mystical, oracular literary prodigy who redefined the Western with Deadwood; and Matthew Weiner, the abrasive, loquacious, obsessive mind behind Mad Men--that's as complex and fascinating in Martin's account as their antihero protagonists are on the screen. Shows like these (and Breaking Bad, The Shield, and Six Feet Under) have dominated the recent cultural conversation in the way that movies did in the 1970s, engendering a passionately engaged and intellectually stimulated audience eager to debate, parse obscure details and evangelize about their favorite programs. Martin thrillingly explains how and why that conversation migrated to the erstwhile "idiot box." A lucid and entertaining analysis of contemporary quality TV, highly recommended to anyone who turns on the box to be challenged and engaged.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143125693
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/29/2014
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
328,468
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

SECTION I Basic Concepts and Foundations

1 Introduction to Technology and Planning

Purpose

The Potential in Primary and Secondary Schools

The Beginning Years

Steady Progress in Administrative Systems
Instructional Systems Show Promise

The Need for Planning

The Systems Approach

Organization

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

2 Basic Concepts of Planning

Planning Fundamentals

Schools as Social Systems

Evaluating the Bottom Line: The Social Process and Rational Models

Common Elements of Educational Planning

Comprehensiveness

Collaboration

Commitment

Continuity

Planning for Technology

Taking a Positive Attitude to Evaluation

Administrative and Instructional Applications

Planning for Administrative Applications

Planning for Instructional Applications

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

3 Technology, Learning, and Equity Issues
Technocentric Education

When Should Computer Education Begin?

Special Education

Gender Issues

Digital Divide Issues

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

SECTION II Technology in Action

4 Technology for School Leadership

Knowledge Is Power

The Age of Knowledge

Databases

Electronic Spreadsheets

Office Automation

Specialized Administrative Applications

Integrating It All Together: Data-Driven Decision Making

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

5 Wisdom and Data-Driven Decision Making

Defining Data-Driven Decision Making

Information Infrastructure

Hardware for Effective Data Management and Access

Software for Data Management and Analysis

People, Decision Making, and the

Social Nature of Information

The Data Analyst

Data-Driven Decision Making Applications

School Enrollment Projections

Improving Teaching and Learning

The Anatomy of a Survey

Evaluation and Nurturing the Process

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

6. Technology in Instruction

Instructional Computing: A New Beginning

Instructional Computing: Some History

A Brief Review of the Research

Defining Technology’s Role: A Touch of Philosophy

Classification Systems and Definitions of Terms

Instructional Software Tools

Instructional

Basic Technology Tools

Word Processing and Desktop Publishing

Spreadsheets

Databases

Electronic Encyclopedias and Reference Works

Specialized Tools and Probeware

Electronic Textbooks (EBooks)

Learning Tools

Drill and Practice

Tutorials

Simulations

Instructional Gaming, Problem Solvingand MUVEs

Programming and Authoring Tools

Programs

High-Level Programming Languages
Authoring Languages

Integrated Learning Systems
Multimedia: A Brief Word
Data Communications
Curriculum Integration and Planning
Case Study
Summary
Key Concepts and Questions
Suggested Activities
References

7 Multimedia in Education
Multimedia Defined
Multimedia for Multiple Intelligences
Multimedia Literacy
Multimedia Technology

Five Levels of Digital Media

The Evolution of Video Technology

Videocassette

Analog Videodisc Technology

Digital Versatile Disc Technology

Multimedia Software

Authoring

Image, Video, and Sound Editing

Digital Animation

Multimedia for Teaching and Learning

Multimedia Resources and Copyrights

Media Distribution Systems - Whiteboards

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

8 Data Communications, the Internet, and Educational Applications
Data Communications in the Schools

The Internet

A Brief History

The Internet Today

The Future of the Internet

The World Wide Web

Protocols and Client Servers

Uniform Resource Locator (URL)

Web Browsers and Search Engines

Commercial Online Services

Applications on the Internet

Multimedia and the Web

Designing Multimedia for Web-Based Learning

Desktop Videoconferencing

The Internet and Education

Global E-Mail

Information Navigation

Creating Web Sites

Blogging on the Web

Course Management Software (CMS)

The Internet and Distance Learning

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

9 Distance Learning
Distance Learning Defined

Distance Learning Technologies: An Overview

Blended Learning

The Extent of Distance Learning in K-12 Education

Designing Instructional Materials: A Comparison of Distance Learning Technologies

The Interactive Videoconference

Asynchronous Learning Using the Internet and World Wide Web

Blended Learning Course

Distance Learning Providers

Distance Learning: Some Issues

The Future of K-12 Distance Learning

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

SECTION III Planning and Implementation

10 Hardware and Software Evaluation

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

A Look at Hardware

A Look at Software

Hardware Evaluation Criteria

Performance

Compatibility

Modularity/Expandability

Ergonomics

Software Availability

Vendor

Cost

Software Evaluation Criteria

Efficiency

Ease of Use

Documentation

Hardware Requirements

Vendor

Cost

Issues in Evaluating Hardware

Evaluating Hardware for Administrative Applications

Evaluating Hardware for Instructional Applications

Mainframes and Servers

Bulk Purchasing, State Contracts and Life Cycles

Issues in Evaluating Software

Administrative Software Evaluation

Instructional Software Evaluation

Open Source Software

Software Life Cycles

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

11 People, Technology and Professional Development

A Long Way to Go

The Professional Development Planning Model

Who Learns?

Different Alternatives for Different Needs

Designing and Implementing Effective Staff Development Programs

Hands-On Activities

One-on-One Coaching

Training the Trainer

Teachers Need Equipment, Too!

Incentives

Evaluation and Review

A Continuous Process

Resources

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

12 Facilities, Policies and Procedures
Getting Bigger

Staffing and Administration

Central Laboratories

Physical Environment

Facilities for Administrative Applications

Facilities for Instructional Applications

Data Communications Facilities and Information Infrastructur

Hardware Maintenance

Making Repairs

Providing Preventive Maintenance

Upgrading

Software Maintenance and Distribution

Policies, Procedures, and Documentation

Policies

Procedures

Documentation

Security

The Helping Place

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

13 Financial Planning

Technology Can Be Expensive

The Cost-Effectiveness of Technology

A Time Line for Financial Planning

The Budget Worksheet

A Budget Modeland Total Cost of Ownership

Special Considerations of Budgeting for Computer Applications

Opting for Centralized or Decentralized

Computer Facilities

Hiring a Consultant

Standardizing on a Common Vendor

Hardware First, Other Needs Later?

Choosing a Purchasing Plan

Sources of Funds

The School District Budget

Bond Issues

Governmental Entities

Gifts and Grants

Case Study

Summary

Key Concepts and Questions

Suggested Activities

References

Epilogue

Appendix A Basic Concepts of Computer Technology

Appendix B Educational Leader Competencies

Appendix C Instructional Software Evaluation Factors

Glossary

Index

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

"[A] wonderfully reported and thoughtful exploration… Difficult Men is grand entertainment, and will be fascinating for anyone curious about the perplexing miracles of how great television comes to be."
—Wall Street Journal
 
"Martin is a thorough reporter and artful storyteller, clearly entranced with, though not deluded by, his subjects…  In between the delicious bits of insider trading, the book makes a strong if not terribly revelatory argument for the creative process."
—Los Angeles Times
 
"Martin offers sharp analysis of the advances in technology and storytelling that helped TV become the 21st century's predominant art form. But his best material comes from interviews with writers, directors, and others who dish about Weiner's egomania, Milch's battles with substance abuse, and Chase's weirdest acid trip ever."
—Entertainment Weekly
 
"Enjoyable, wildly readable."
—Boston Globe
 
"An engaging, entertaining, and utterly convincing chronicle of television's transformation… Martin operates with an enviable fearlessness, painting warts-and-all portraits of autocratic showrunners such as David Milch (Deadwood), David Simon (The Wire) and Matthew Weiner (Mad Men)… Anyone interested in television should read this book, no matter how much or how little they know about the shows it chronicles."
—Newsday
 
"Difficult Men, with its vigorous reporting and keen analysis, is one of those books that crystallizes a cultural moment and lets you savor it all the more."
Dallas Morning News
 
"Martin's analysis is intelligent and his culture commentary will be of interest to fans of many of today's better-written shows."
—Christian Science Monitor
 
"Masterful… unveils the mysterious-to-all-but-insiders process that takes place in the rooms where TV shows are written."
—New Orleans Times-Picayune
 
'Difficult Men delivers what it promises. Martin had good access to actors, writers and producers . . . Difficult Men is an entertaining, well-written peek at the creative process."
—Fort Worth Star Telegram
 
 "A vastly entertaining and insightful look at the creators of some of the most highly esteemed recent television series… Martin’s stated goal is to recount the culmination of what he calls the 'Third Golden Age of Television.'  And he does so with his own sophisticated synthesis or reporting, on-set observations, and critical thinking, proving himself as capable of passing judgment, of parsing strengths and weaknesses of any given TV show, as any reviewer who covers the beat… in short, the sort of criticism that must now extend to television as much as it does to any other first-rate art."
Bookforum
 
"[Showrunners are] as complex and fascinating in Martin’s account as their anti-hero protagonists are on the screen… Breaking Bad, The Shield, and Six Feet Under have dominated the recent cultural conversation in the way that movies did in the 1970s…. Martin thrillingly explains how and why that conversation migrated to the erstwhile 'idiot box.' A lucid and entertaining analysis of contemporary quality TV, highly recommended to anyone who turns on the box to be challenged and engaged."
—Kirkus (starred)
 
"Martin deftly traces TV's evolution from an elitist technology in a handful of homes, to an entertainment wasteland reflecting viewers' anomie, to 'the signature American art form of the first decade of the twenty-first century.'"
Publishers Weekly
 
"Brett Martin lays out the whole story of TV’s new Golden Age — lucidly and backed by awesome reporting (and TV watching)… Difficult Men delivers the inside story of the creation of these landmark TV shows, along with Martin’s astute take on how these series fit into the larger pop cultural landscape of the early 21st century… If I were you, I’d pre-order this terrific book on my Kindle or Nook. It should be among the most talked-about non-fiction titles of the summer."—ctnews.com

Sarah Vowell
This book taught me a thing or two about how a few weird executives enabled a handful of weirder writers to make shows I still can't believe were on TV. But what I found more interesting —and disturbing —is how it helped me understand why an otherwise lily-livered, civic-minded nice girl like me wants to curl up with a bunch of commandment-breaking, Constitution-trampling psychos —and that's just the cops.
—Sarah Vowell, New York Times bestselling author of Unfamiliar Fishes, The Worldly Shipmates, and Assassination Vacation

Meet the Author

Brett Martin is a correspondent for GQ and won the James Beard Journalism Award in 2012. His work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Bon Appétit, the New York Times, The New Yorker, and multiple anthologies and publications. He is also a frequent contributor to This American Life. He lives in New Orleans.

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Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago