Digital Empire, Vol. 3: Phuturism

Digital Empire, Vol. 3: Phuturism

     
 
In the 1970s, K-Tel was considered the epitome of mainstream. Back then, the term "cutting edge" was never used in connection with K-Tel, which hipsters and collectors regarded as the label that sold compilations of Top 40 music to housewives at the local dime store. The 1990s, however, found K-Tel trying to acquire a hipper image and paying more attention to music's

Overview

In the 1970s, K-Tel was considered the epitome of mainstream. Back then, the term "cutting edge" was never used in connection with K-Tel, which hipsters and collectors regarded as the label that sold compilations of Top 40 music to housewives at the local dime store. The 1990s, however, found K-Tel trying to acquire a hipper image and paying more attention to music's cutting edge -- if you had considered K-Tel square in the past, collections of heavy metal, hardcore rap, alternative rock, electronica, and underground rave music challenged your opinion of the label, making it clear that the K-Tel of the 1990s was much different from the K-Tel of the 1970s. Even if the label's 1990s compilations didn't always have the type of comprehensive, informative liner notes that a collector expected from Rhino -- a company that collectors have held in extremely high regard -- its choice of material seemed to be, in many cases, growing more adventurous. In the year 2000, dance music didn't get much more underground than Digital Empire 3: Phuturism. Focusing on such club styles as techno, trance, trip-hop, electronica, big beat, and acid house, this two-CD set often sounds like the soundtrack to a rave -- exactly what K-Tel was going for. None of these tunes by Wink, Leftfield, Grooverider, Kid Acid, and others have an actual song structure; Phuturism is about beats, mixes, and tracks, not songs or lyrics. Generally intriguing, if limited, Phuturism won't win over anyone who doesn't comprehend the rave subculture; but for those who are into raving -- or at least frequenting legal dance clubs that offer rave-like mixes -- it's a collection that's worth picking up.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/22/2000
Label:
K-Tel
UPC:
0022775644524
catalogNumber:
6445

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Dynamix II   Track Performer
Moby   Track Performer
Underworld   Track Performer
Afrika Bambaataa   Track Performer
Leftfield   Track Performer
Pigeonhed   Track Performer
µ-Ziq   Track Performer
Josh Wink   Track Performer
Richie Hawtin   Track Performer
Freddy Fresh   Track Performer
Luke Slater   Track Performer
Grooverider   Track Performer
Fatboy Slim   Track Performer
Hooverphonic   Track Performer
DJ Dan   Track Performer
Dubtribe Sound System   Track Performer
Finley Quaye   Track Performer
Fidelity Allstars   Track Performer
<<rinôçérôse>>   Track Performer
Nalin & Kane   Track Performer
Christopher Just   Track Performer
Kid Acid   Track Performer
Esthero   Track Performer
DJ ESP   Track Performer
DeeJay Punk-Roc   Track Performer
Jark Prongo   Track Performer
Walkman   Track Performer
Needle Damage   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Moby   Composer
G. Jackson   Composer
Dieter Meier   Composer
Woody McBride   Producer
B.J. Robinson   Composer
Patrick Whalen   Producer
Keith Morioka   Art Direction
Moonbeam Jones   Composer
Sunshine Jones   Composer

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