Digital Home Networking / Edition 1

Digital Home Networking / Edition 1

by Romain Carbou
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1848213212

ISBN-13: 9781848213210

Pub. Date: 12/06/2011

Publisher: Wiley

In an era of ubiquity, nomadism and ecological challenge, the maturity of wireless technologies, the readiness of broadband Internet access and the popularity of smart terminals should contribute to emancipating IT services; in connection with the home and home-based, resources. This book, in light of several years of applied research and technological surveys,

Overview

In an era of ubiquity, nomadism and ecological challenge, the maturity of wireless technologies, the readiness of broadband Internet access and the popularity of smart terminals should contribute to emancipating IT services; in connection with the home and home-based, resources. This book, in light of several years of applied research and technological surveys, aims at describing the digital home networking environment, its techniques, and the challenges around its service architecture.

Digital Home Networking aims to provide a broad introduction to state-of-the-art digital home standards and protocols, as well as an in-depth description of service architectures for entertainment and domotic services involving digital home resources. The book covers aspects such as networking, remote access, security, interoperability, scalability and Quality of Service. Notably, it describes the generic architecture, which was proposed and developed in the context of the EUREKA/Celtic research project "FeelθHome".

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848213210
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
12/06/2011
Series:
ISTE Series , #587
Pages:
396
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Romain Carbou 1

1.1 Cultural context around a definition 1

1.2 A brief history of home automation 3

1.2.1 Stay naive and humble 3

1.2.2 Terminology around domotics 5

1.2.3 A bit of history 5

1.3 Coming to a definition of the digital home 7

1.3.1 What is in the digital home? 8

1.3.2 What is not in the digital home? 8

1.4 Plan of this book 9

1.5 Bibliography 10

Chapter 2 Actors in Digital Home Networking Romain Carbou 11

2.1 Scope 11

2.2 Categories of actors 12

2.2.1 Persons 12

2.2.2 Other home actors 13

2.2.3 Services and third parties 13

2.2.4 Legal bodies and public services 14

2.3 User roles 15

2.4 Bibliography 16

Chapter 3 Network Technologies Pablo Najera Ana Nleto 17

3.1 Local connectivity and networks 17

3.1.1 Background of LAN technologies 18

3.1.2 Ethernet 19

3.1.3 IEEE 802.11x 21

3.1.4 Bluetooth 24

3.1.5 IEEE 802.15.4 26

3.1.6 Comparison of LAN technologies 28

3.2 Connectivity to main networks 30

3.2.1 Technologies providing Internet access - an overview 30

3.2.2 xDSL 33

3.2.3 FTTH 36

3.2.4 3G 40

3.2.5 WiMAX 44

3.2.6 Long-term evolution 47

3.2.7 Comparison of broadband technologies 51

3.3 Bibliography 54

Chapter 4 Standards Rémi Bars Jorge Gomez-Montalvo Mohamed Mahdi Cristina Alcaraz Rodrigo Roman 59

4.1 Introduction 59

4.2 Standards used in the home 59

4.2.1 DLNA: Digital Living Network Alliance 59

4.2.2 UPnP 62

4.2.3 ZigBee 70

4.3 Remote access to homes 82

4.3.1 P2P and web service 83

4.3.2 UPnP remote access 84

4.3.3 HGI remote access 85

4.3.4 TISPAN remote access (based on UPnP RA: 1) 86

4.3.5 TISPAN RA using UPnP proxy 88

4.4 Bibliography 92

Chapter 5 Personalization and Home Context Gema Maestro Lin Sun Daqing Zhang Bin Guo 97

5.1 Introduction 97

5.2 Personalization 98

5.2.1 Personalization-related standards 99

5.2.2 A personalization engine for extended digital homes 107

5.3 Context management and sharing 112

5.3.1 Tools for handling context semantics 113

5.3.2 Context manager 121

5.4 Protégé - an ontology editor 129

5.4.1 Description and usage 129

5.4.2 Feel@Home personalization ontology 131

5.5 Bibliography 136

Chapter 6 Security Anas Abou El Kalam Marc Lacoste Mohamed Maachaoui Francisco Moyano Rodrigo Roman 139

6.1 Importance of security and privacy 139

6.1.1 Security considerations in digital home scenarios 140

6.1.2 Privacy considerations in digital home scenarios 141

6.1.3 Trust considerations in digital home scenarios 142

6.2 Security requirements of the extended digital home 143

6.2.1 Approach 143

6.2.2 Device requirements 145

6.2.3 User requirements 146

6.2.4 Information requirements 147

6.2.5 Privacy requirements 147

6.2.6 Toward service-oriented home network architectures 149

6.3 A conceptual security architecture 149

6.3.1 Introduction 149

6.3.2 Functional architecture 150

6.3.3 Organic architecture 152

6.3.4 Discussions 155

6.4 Relevant security mechanisms 156

6.4.1 Authentication 156

6.4.2 Trust model 164

6.4.3 Privacy and anonymity 170

6.4.4 Usability 182

6.5 Applying the security architecture 189

6.5.1 IMS embodiment 189

6.5.2 VPN embodiment 191

6.6 Bibliography 195

Chapter 7 Quality of Experience and Quality of Service Jorge Gómez-Montalvo Ernesto Exposito 203

7.1 Introduction 203

7.2 QoS concepts and standards 204

7.2.1 Quality of experience 206

7.2.2 QoS at the transport layer 208

7.2.3 QoS at the network layer 212

7.2.4 QoS at link layer 214

7.2.5 UPnP AV architecture and UPnP QoS architecture 218

7.3 IETF multimedia protocols 220

7.3.1 Session protocols 220

7.3.2 Multimedia streaming transport protocols 222

7.3.3 QoS parameters for multimedia applications 223

7.4 Semantic approach for QoS management in home networks 223

7.4.1 MODA: a layered multimedia ontology-based framework for QoS 224

7.4.2 Putting semantics and QoS for home networks together: MODA and UPnP QoS-a study case 234

7.5 Conclusion 25l

7.6 Bibliography 252

Chapter 8 Service Management Marta Bel Martin Olivier Dugeon Mien Fasson Anas Abou El Kalam Mohamed Maachaoui Béatrice Paillassa Francisco Javier Ramón Salguero Warodom Werapun 259

8.1 Introduction 259

8.2 Service management basis 260

8.2.1 Service characteristics 260

8.2.2 Architecture distribution 261

8.3 Basic protocols 262

8.3.1 HTTP 262

8.3.2 SIP 268

8.4 Network architecture and service management 277

8.4.1 VPN 278

8.4.2 IMS 286

8.4.3 P2P networks 293

8.4.4 SIP and P2P integration 300

8.5 Conclusion 305

8.6 Bibliography 306

Chapter 9 The Feel@Home System Marta Bel Martin Gema Maestro Molina Mohamed Mahdi Olivier Dugeon 309

9.1 The Feel@Home architecture 309

9.1.1 Entity diagram 311

9.1.2 Functional analysis 313

9.1.3 Components diagram 318

9.1.4 Nodes and interfaces 321

9.1.5 Sequence diagrams 325

9.1.6 Conclusions 329

9.2 Local and remote content distribution through VPN 329

9.2.1 Functional description 330

9.2.2 Hardware devices 332

9.2.3 Selected technologies and libraries 333

9.2.4 Software components 333

9.2.5 Security 334

9.2.6 Personalization 335

9.3 Local and remote content distribution through IMS 337

9.3.1 Selected technologies and libraries 337

9.3.2 Functional description 339

9.3.3 Interoperators interconnection 347

9.3.4 QoS support in IMS 348

9.3.5 Security 349

9.3.6 Software components 350

9.3.7 Test bed 350

9.4 Conclusion 352

9.5 Bibliography 353

Chapter 10 Home Interconnection through the Internet Olivier Dugeon Mohamed Mahdi 355

10.1 Introduction 355

10.2 Interoperability scenarios 356

10.2.1 Definition and requirements 356

10.2.2 VPN/TMS gateway architecture 357

10.2.3 Common policy rules management 359

10.2.4 IMS/VPN common APIs 360

10.2.5 Architecture 363

10.2.6 VPN to IMS scenario 364

10.2.7 IMS to VPN scenario 365

10.2.8 Deployment issues 369

10.3 Internet-based content sharing between remote homes 370

10.3.1 Synthesis of multimedia content sharing solutions 370

10.3.2 Proxify UPnP A/V 373

10.3.3 Implementation, security and performance 382

10.4 Conclusion 384

10.5 Bibliography 384

Chapter 11 Conclusion Michel Diaz 385

11.1 Bibliography 388

List of Authors 389

Index 391

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