Digitizing the News: Innovation in Online Newspapers / Edition 1

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Overview

In this study of how daily newspapers in America have developed electronic publishing ventures, Pablo Boczkowski shows that new media emerge not just in a burst of revolutionary technological change but by merging the structures and practices of existing media with newly available technical capabilities. His multi-disciplinary perspectives of science and technology,
communication, and organization studies allow him to address the connections between technical,
editorial, and work facets of new media. This approach yields analytical insights into the material culture of online newsrooms, the production processes of new media products, and the relationships between offline and online dynamics.Boczkowski traces daily newspapers' early consumer-oriented non-print publishing initiatives, from the now-forgotten videotex efforts of the 1980s to the rise of the World Wide Web in the mid- 1990s. He then examines the formative years of news on the Web during the second half of the 1990s, when the content of online newspapers varied from simple reproduction of the print edition to new material with interactive and multimedia features. With this picture of the recent history of non-print publishing as background, Boczkowski provides ethnographic, fly-on-the-wall accounts of three innovations in content creation: the Technology section of the New York Times on the Web, which was initially intended as the newspaper's space for experimentation with online news; the Virtual Voyager project of the HoustonChronicle.com, in which reporters pushed the envelope of multimedia journalism; and the Community Connection initiative of
New Jersey Online, in which users became content producers. His analyses of these ventures reveal how innovation in online newspapers became an ongoing process in which different combinations of initial conditions and local contingencies led publishers along divergent paths of content creation.

The MIT Press

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher

"Although approximately one million Americans operated ham radios in the course of the 20th century, very little has been written about this thriving technical culture in our midst.
Kristen Haring offers a deeply sympathetic history of this under-appreciated technical community and their role in contributing to American advances in science and technology, especially the electronics industry. In the process she reveals how technical tinkering has defined manhood in the
United States and has powerfully constituted 'technical identities' with often utopian, even, at times, revolutionary, notions about the social uses of technology."--Susan Douglas, Catherine Neafie
Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies, University of Michigan, and author of *Listening In:
Radio and the American Imagination*

The MIT Press

" Digitizing the News shows how dramatic innovations can unfold from the coevolution of social and technical choices made over several decades. Putting the news online is changing the production, editing, and consumption of news in ways that shape content in significant ways. How different enterprises have made these choices around the Internet and the news has created a variety of paths to the future of electronic news media. Students in the social sciences and humanities, particularly within communication and journalism, will value this book,
which illustrates how research on new media can inform, and be informed by, social studies of science and technology." William H. Dutton, Director, Oxford Internet Institute

The MIT Press

' Digitizing the News is a rich, nuanced account of the divergent ways that established print media reacted to new digital technologies. Reluctant to relinquish their gatekeeping role and the dominant logic of 'we publish, consumers read,' newspapers were slow to accommodate non-print forms of information delivery. Boczkowski shows how these decisions were shaped by both the politics of newsrooms and differing conceptions of the audience. This lively book deserves attention from students of technology and the media.' Walter W. Powell, Stanford
University

The MIT Press

' Digitizing the Newsshows how dramatic innovations can unfold from the coevolution of social and technical choices made over several decades. Putting the news online is changing the production, editing, and consumption of news in ways that shape content in significant ways. How different enterprises have made these choices around the Internet and the news has created a variety of paths to the future of electronic news media. Students in the social sciences and humanities, particularly within communication and journalism, will value this book,
which illustrates how research on new media can inform, and be informed by, social studies of science and technology.' William H. Dutton, Director, Oxford Internet Institute

The MIT Press

"In Digitizing the News, Pablo Boczkowski's keen eye for organizational detail, insistence on the importance of history, and rich appreciation for scholarly ideas combine to produce an astute investigation of the way newspapers have confronted the challenge of the World Wide Web." Joseph Turow, Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, Annenberg
School For Communication, University of Pennsylvania

The MIT Press

"In *Digitizing the News*, Pablo Boczkowski's keen eye for organizational detail,
insistence on the importance of history, and rich appreciation for scholarly ideas combine to produce an astute investigation of the way newspapers have confronted the challenge of the world wide web."--Joseph Turow, Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, Annenberg School For
Communication, University of Pennsylvania

The MIT Press

"*Digitizing the News* is a rich, nuanced account of the divergent ways that established print media reacted to new digital technologies. Reluctant to relinquish their gatekeeping role, and the dominant logic of 'we publish, consumers read,' newspapers were slow to accommodate non-print forms of information delivery. Boczkowski shows how these decisions were shaped by both the politics of newsrooms and differing conceptions of the audience. This lively book deserves attention from students of technology and the media."--Walter W. Powell, Stanford
University

The MIT Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262524391
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 3/1/2005
  • Series: Inside Technology
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Pablo J. Boczkowski is Professor and Director of the Program in Media, Technology, and Society at Northwestern University. He is the author of Digitizing the News: Innovation in Online
Newspapers
(MIT Press) and News at Work: Imitation in an Age of Information
Abundance
.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
1 Emerging Media 1
2 Exploring and Settling: Alternatives to Print in the 1980s and the Early 1990s 19
3 Hedging: A Web of Challenges in the Second Half of the 1990s 51
4 Mimetic Originality: The New York Times on the Web's Technology Section 73
5 Vicarious Experiences: HoustonChronicle.com's Virtual Voyager 105
6 Distributed Construction: New Jersey Online's Community Connection 141
7 "When We Were Print People" 171
App Research Design 189
Notes 193
Bibliography 211
Series List 239
Index 241
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