Dimiter

Dimiter

3.8 31
by William Peter Blatty
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

William Peter Blatty has thrilled generations of readers with his iconic mega-bestseller The Exorcist. Now Blatty gives us Dimiter, a riveting story of murder, revenge, and suspense. Laced with themes of faith and love, sin and forgiveness, vengeance and compassion, it is a novel in the grand tradition of the great Catholic novels of the 20th Century.

Overview

William Peter Blatty has thrilled generations of readers with his iconic mega-bestseller The Exorcist. Now Blatty gives us Dimiter, a riveting story of murder, revenge, and suspense. Laced with themes of faith and love, sin and forgiveness, vengeance and compassion, it is a novel in the grand tradition of the great Catholic novels of the 20th Century.

Dimiter opens in the world's most oppressive and isolated totalitarian state: Albania in the 1970s. A prisoner suspected of being an enemy agent is held by state security. An unsettling presence, though subjected to unimaginable torture he maintains an eerie silence. He escapes---and on the way to freedom, completes a mysterious mission. The prisoner is Dimiter, the American "agent from Hell."

The scene shifts to Jerusalem, focusing on Hadassah Hospital and a cast of engaging, colorful characters: the brooding Christian Arab police detective, Peter Meral; Dr. Moses Mayo, a troubled but humorous neurologist; Samia, an attractive, sharp-tongued nurse; and assorted American and Israeli functionaries and hospital staff. All become enmeshed in a series of baffling, inexplicable deaths, until events explode in a surprising climax.

Told with unrelenting pace, Dimiter's compelling, page-turning narrative is haunted by the search for faith and the truths of the human condition. Dimiter is William Peter Blatty's first full novel since the 1983 publication of Legion.

At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Blatty fans looking for straight-up horror in the vein of The Exorcist will be disappointed, but those with broader tastes will find this a beautifully written, haunting tale of vengeance, spiritual searching, loss, and love. In 1973 Albania, Colonel Vlora (aka “the Interrogator”), the head of a team of torturers, questions “the Prisoner,” who the reader later learns is Paul Dimiter, “an American clandestine agent referred to in some quarters of the world as 'legendary,’ while in others as 'the agent from hell.’ ” (Rumor has it Dimiter poisoned Ho Chi Minh while the Vietnamese leader was visiting Albania shortly before his death in 1969.) Dimiter escapes to Jerusalem, where he encounters a number of engaging characters, including a doctor of neurology, a sharp-tongued nurse, and a grief-stricken Israeli policeman. The complicated plot confounds until the isolated pieces of the psychological puzzle that’s Dimiter match up and fall into place, revealing surprising truths. (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
From the author of The Exorcist (1971), a halting, unfocused thriller about a series of mysterious events in Jerusalem. Blatty begins with a numbing, cluttered and confusing prologue, set against the political intrigue and violence in Albania in the 1970s. In a series of sessions, some, for no clear reason, reproduced as transcripts, a man identified as "the Interrogator" attempts to break down "the Prisoner." The Prisoner remains tight lipped until the Interrogator uses sodium pentothal to get him to talk. In a mysterious feat "never quite understood" the Prisoner takes out his guards and escapes. Three days later, on a Sunday, he appears before seven men in a barn. Back at his office, the Interrogator reflects on his Prisoner, now identified as Dimiter, "the agent from Hell." Blatty thereupon shifts to Jerusalem and Hadassah Hospital, scene of a murder, the miraculous recovery of a two-year-old from cancer and, "at the end of the hall, something black and quick." For good measure, there's also mention of a case of leprosy and, later, the discovery of a body in the tomb of Christ. The narrative mostly turns into a rather unremarkable police procedural as police detective Peter Meral (perhaps the only character with any dimension) takes on the case of American novelist Eddie Shore. Shore, hospitalized for food poisoning, dies suspiciously of cardiac arrest. Then Moses Mayo, a neurologist at Hadassah, dies, and Meral is convinced he was murdered. Periodic references to Dimiter promise to draw together the diffuse plot strands, with Blatty periodically breaking in to suggest that all will come together as he ends several chapters on a portentous note: " ‘The only cover you can blow now isthe lid on his coffin.' Which, in its way, would later prove to be prophetic." Cue rain and wind and dreams about Christ's resurrection from the tomb to add a quasi-mysterious, quasi-spiritual overlay. A holding pattern that never wants to end.
From the Publisher

“Dimiter is an intelligent, tightly wound, suspenseful novel. One can only hope Blatty will publish another sometime soon.” —USA Today

“Gripping and intelligent, Dimiter is part detective story and part religious thriller in the grand tradition of The Name of the Rose.” —Allan Folsom, New York Times bestselling author

“Enfolds a message of faith in a fast-paced thriller” —Los Angeles Times

“A beautifully written, haunting tale of vengeance, spiritual searching, loss, and love.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429961103
Publisher:
Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date:
03/16/2010
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
377,070
File size:
297 KB

Videos

Meet the Author

William Peter Blatty, the writer of numerous novels and screenplays, is best known for his mega-bestselling novel The Exorcist, deemed by the New York Times Book Review to be "as superior to most books of its kind as an Einstein equation is to an accountant's column of figures." An Academy Award winner for his screenplay for The Exorcist, Blatty is not only the author of one of the most terrifying novels ever written, but, paradoxically, also cowrote the screenplay for the hilarious Inspector Clouseau film, A Shot in the Dark. New York Times reviewers of his early comic novels noted, "Nobody can write funnier lines than William Peter Blatty," describing him as "a gifted virtuoso who writes like S. J. Perelman." Blatty lives with his wife and a son in Maryland.


William Peter Blatty is best known for his mega-bestselling novel The Exorcist. Blatty also cowrote the screenplay of the hilarious Inspector Clouseau film, A Shot in the Dark. Known for his early comic novels, the New York Times proclaimed that "nobody can write funnier lines than William Peter Blatty," describing him as "a gifted virtuoso who writes like S. J. Perelman." Blatty lives with his wife and a son in Maryland.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Dimiter 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Kindle-be-damned More than 1 year ago
This novel is like none other I have read. The opening chapters are moody and mysterious and the writing is quite beautiful. We are quickly introduced to the story's central character, "Dimiter," who then recedes into the backround as the scene shifts from Albania to Jerusalem. Only gradually do we see what his place is in this second half, and the key role he plays in the story as a whole. The plot is not a simple one. Several narrative threads are created along more or less parallel lines, then dropped for a time, only to be picked up and concluded later in the book. Eventually, all of these strands are woven together and a startling picture emerges. I won't spoil your read by revealing what that picture is. I will say, however, that it is most unusual as well as uplifting in a completely unexpected way. If I were to point out any drawback to the book as a whole, I would say that the second half seems somewhat shortened compared to the first. And I enjoyed the story and the quality of the writing so much that I would have been preferred to see the story extended for several more chapters. As it is, however, the pace is quick and the tension builds until the "mystery" of Dimiter is revealed. This is not a book for everyone, however. I think you have to love fine writing and be interested in exploring some pretty serious subjects, like the nature of God's involvement (if any) in this world and the extent to which violent acts can conceivably be justified in the name of a "good" God to fully appreciate it. This book tackles some weighty topics much in the way that "The Exorcist" (also by Blatty) does, but the stories are not similar otherwise. And anyone who picks up this book expecting spinning heads or pea soup will be disappointed. If memory serves, this book is darker and more serious in tone than "The Exorcist", despite the many surprising humorous exchanges between some of the characters in the second half. (Surprising to see on the book's dust jacket that the author has written several humorous books and screenplays, including "A Shot in the Dark", one of the first Inspecter Clouseau films.) And while I can't say that it has changed my mind about God or any of the topics mentioned above, it has certainly made me think more deeply about them. This is a book that almost demands a second reading, because there are many subtle, almost subconscious clues regarding the climax scattered throughout the earlier chapters. In addition, the main characters in the Jerusalem section of the book possess a depth which one does not usually encounter in a "thriller" of this kind. In short, I highly recommend this book, but be prepared to be challenged and have your thinking cap on and fully-charged when you sit down to read it. Meanwhile, buy the hardcover. Kindle be damned!
SheilaCE More than 1 year ago
During 1973, a mysterious figure is taken captive in the totalitarian state of Albania and interrogated by authorities using extreme methods of torture. Impervious to pain and unwilling to speak about his true identity, the prisoner confounds his captors until his remarkable escape. One year later, a series of strange occurrences that include the unexplainable healing of a boy with an incurable condition and the discovery of a body in Christ's tomb have gained the attention of local authorities and intelligence officials. In their struggle to understand this enigmatic case, they discover a plot that is utterly confounding in its complexity. And at the center of it there is a man without an identity, a man who is very dangerous. He is called Dimiter, the Agent of Hell. Dimiter, a fascinating and well-crafted suspense novel, is the newest release by William Peter Blatty, the author of the horror classic The Exorcist. Its mystery has a depth that will captivate readers until its final pages. With imagination and eloquence, William Peter Blatty writes Dimiter, a story that is sure to have mystery-lovers and suspense enthusiasts enthralled for some time to come.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1973 in Albania, security chief Colonel Vlora the "Interrogator" works to break a prisoner suspected of being an American agent. He and his experts torture the Prisoner in ways the Spanish Inquisition would never of imagined, but the source of their assault never even screams once; instead he takes everything slammed at him in total silence. Even more shocking to his hosts, "the Prisoner" does the impossible; he escapes and completes his mission. At Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem, a series of unexplained deaths shake up the staff. Christian Arab police detective Peter Meral leads the investigation that seems to be going nowhere. Whereas Americans and Israelis struggle with the happenings, none yet know that the Albanian Prisoner, Paul Dimiter is in the Holy City doing what he does best causing hell. This is not an easy read as the exciting story line seems incoherent when suddenly like a magician William Peter Blatty brilliantly brings it together in a thrilling psychological suspense thriller. Dimiter is an eerie individual who has figuratively lost his soul (not in a horror novel - Exorcist sense) but seeks some form of redemption. Readers will relish the shocking truths as to who he is and why Albania (ask Ho Chi Minh about him) and then Jerusalem. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thoroughly enjoyed this novel!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Timothy Wilson More than 1 year ago
I couldn't put this book down once I started. Blatty has an immersive style of writing that sucks you in right from the go.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago