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Dinosaur Parents, Dinosaur Young: Uncovering the Mystery of Dinosaur Families
     

Dinosaur Parents, Dinosaur Young: Uncovering the Mystery of Dinosaur Families

by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld, Bruce Shillinglaw (Illustrator), Paul Carrick (Illustrator)
 

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Is it possible that dinosaurs were good parents? For many years, scientists didn’t think so. Then an amazing discovery revealed that Maiasaura covered its nest with vegetation to keep its eggs warm. Another exciting find showed that Oviraptor sat on its nest just as birds do. Based on this and other new evidence, scientists now believe that many—if not

Overview

Is it possible that dinosaurs were good parents? For many years, scientists didn’t think so. Then an amazing discovery revealed that Maiasaura covered its nest with vegetation to keep its eggs warm. Another exciting find showed that Oviraptor sat on its nest just as birds do. Based on this and other new evidence, scientists now believe that many—if not most—dinosaurs may have cared for their young. Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld draws from the very latest findings to describe how scientists are continu-ally making new discoveries and drawing new conclusions about what life was like for dinosaurs and their young. The result is an exciting and accessible book, packed with beautiful, informative illustrations and photographs, that brings us closer than ever before to the truth about dinosaur families. Glossary, bibliography, index.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The author of this well-written book summarizes where scientists are on the bird-versus-lizard ancestry of dinosaurs by presenting and interpreting clearly organized evidence about dinosaur families. In a fascinating six-chapter narrative, she traces the mistaken conclusion of the Roy Chapman Andrews expedition (in 1923) that Oviraptors in the Gobi Desert were robbing eggs from nests. Zoehfeld describes how research seventy years later actually examined the egg embryos and showed this dinosaur to be protecting or incubating its own nest. So questions keep changing—from the earliest, did dinosaurs lay eggs? If so, which ones? And now, how did they treat the eggs? Did dinosaurs bond in groups and raise their young like birds or did they, like reptiles, walk away? Researchers in the last thirty years have uncovered duckbill nesting sites in which dinosaurs, like penguins, had a nursery; the fossilized remains showed eggshells crushed by the tiny inhabitants as they matured. Many types of illustrations, photographs, maps, drawings and paintings help the reader visualize what the text describes. By tracing evidence that destroys old beliefs or modifies them, the author catches the excitement of scientific inquiry in a field dear to children. Readers are brought up to date about whether and which species of dinosaurs were protective parents, advancing our knowledge of how dinosaurs lived and their relationship to modern animals. 2001, Clarion, $17.00. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: Susan Hepler
Scientists now believe that at least some dinosaurs were protective parents. However, in the 1800's it was difficult to imagine that dinosaurs bonded in pairs or larger social groups to build nests, feed babies, and protect the babies from enemies. In the 1990's the discovery of oviraptor fossils that indicated brooding behavior shed new light on dinosaur behavior, suggesting that it resembled that of birds. This well written and nicely illustrated book belongs in every school or family library that contains dinosaur titles. It includes a glossary, a dinosaur dictionary, and a suggested reading list. 2001, Clarion Books, $17.00. Ages 10 to 12. Reviewer: M. Henebry SOURCE: Parent Council, September 2001 (Vol. 9, No. 1)
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-Zoehfeld begins with a tale about an Oviraptor father buried by a sandstorm in a seemingly protective posture over a nest of 16 eggs 73 million years ago. She then explores changing theories of dinosaur life based on scientific discoveries-from Roy Chapman Andrews's Gobi Expedition discovery of a birdlike Oviraptor skeleton at the site of a nest of eggs in 1923 to discoveries of fossil evidence of nesting grounds of titanosaurs in Patagonia in 1998. In a concluding chapter on the future of exploration, Zoehfeld clearly points out that new discoveries may lead paleontologists to revise theories about dinosaurs and the way they lived. High-quality, color photographs of fossils of eggs and embryos and of paleontologists at work as well as line drawings and full-color paintings add to this inviting, thought-provoking book. Readers of Nic Bishop's Digging for Bird-Dinosaurs (Houghton, 2000) and Christopher Sloan's Feathered Dinosaurs (National Geographic, 2000) will be intrigued by it.-Carolyn Angus, The Claremont Graduate School, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher

"lively presentation challenges the reader and presents science as an exciting, unfolding mystery with many clues still unsolved...Fascinating." Kirkus Reviews

Zoehfeld clearly and carefully guides readers through the complex historical trail of evidence collection and theory development that make up what we currently believe we know about dinosaur family life.
Horn Book

Children will use this substantive, well-organized book for reports, but the attractive design and compelling text will also encourage pleasure reading for dinosaur fans. Booklist, ALA

High-quality color photographs of fossils of eggs abd embryos and of paleontologists at works as well as line drawings and full-color paintings add to this inviting, thought-provoking book.
School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618752447
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
01/22/2007
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.24(d)
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld is author of many books on scientific subjects for young people. She lives in Norwalk, Connecticut

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