Dionysus or Bacchus: Myths of Grape Harvest: Photo Essay

Overview

Dionysus or Bacchus is photo essay about half son of the highest of Gods. The Titan Lords intended to overthrow Zeus, and reinstate Cronus or time to be god. The painted their faces white in gypsum and turned an unclothed boy god Dionysus into a girl. They then mutilated the girl. Zeus was to send Titans to hell of their own creation, and renanimate Dionysus Olympian God from a wooden doll. He is considered God of grape harvest; such as to defy psychology of creativity from word defying evolutions to be madness. ...
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Overview

Dionysus or Bacchus is photo essay about half son of the highest of Gods. The Titan Lords intended to overthrow Zeus, and reinstate Cronus or time to be god. The painted their faces white in gypsum and turned an unclothed boy god Dionysus into a girl. They then mutilated the girl. Zeus was to send Titans to hell of their own creation, and renanimate Dionysus Olympian God from a wooden doll. He is considered God of grape harvest; such as to defy psychology of creativity from word defying evolutions to be madness. The essay gives predominately vain portrayal of affects to mind and spirit from grapes. Very little literature has ever been found; such as to modify intelligence from more ideas. You find Biblical verse of bread and wine in communion to Jesus Christ; although Dionysus myth has notes about creative frenzy from harvesting grapes. The Roman Bacchus is considered same entity has Greek Dionysus. Instruction to classical language finds person to intrude onto a land to not be real; so to already determine some manner of destiny. Bacchus is noted of Roman skills at telling of myth, and is portrayed of decision scheme to shift more into reverse. I provide reviews of image based ancient stories, and include 'do not enter' and potential 'poison' by art works. You find cautions to never speak directly of thought. The story is analogous to the Roman, and find Hercules and brother 'good theory' from house of Perseus said to rule Olympus. See Hercules drunk on wine, and to be walked along by mere word. The encouragement of children to allege idea to be molestation are shown at Hercules bedside. Find photo of lead poisoning and fetal alcohol syndrome from very small doses of wine. I include art of Goddess Hestia as ruler of hearth and home; whom at reincarnation of Dionysus departs Olympus. The photo essay discusses themes like gluttony and party; while present ideals of requiring story to avoid sun versus moon harvest to find this party. The essay portrays Dionysus to ride cheetah or donkey.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781468162165
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 2/17/2012
  • Pages: 172
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.45 (d)

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