Dirty White Boys by Stephen Hunter, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Dirty White Boys

Dirty White Boys

4.2 49
by Stephen Hunter
     
 

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They busted out of McAlester State Penitentiary—three escaped convicts going to ground in a world unprepared for anything like them....

Lamar Pye is prince of the Dirty White Boys.  With a lion in his soul, he roars—for he is the meanest, deadliest animal on the loose....
Odell is Lamar's cousin, a hulking manchild with unfeeling eyes. 

Overview

They busted out of McAlester State Penitentiary—three escaped convicts going to ground in a world unprepared for anything like them....

Lamar Pye is prince of the Dirty White Boys.  With a lion in his soul, he roars—for he is the meanest, deadliest animal on the loose....
Odell is Lamar's cousin, a hulking manchild with unfeeling eyes.  He lives for daddy Lamar.  Surely he will die for him....
Richard's survival hangs on a sketch: a crude drawing of a lion and a half-naked woman.  For this Lamar has let Richard live...

Armed to the teeth, Lamar and his boys have cut a path of terror across the Southwest, and pushed one good cop into a crisis of honor and conscience.  Trooper Bud Pewtie should have died once at Lamar's hands.  Now they're about to meet again.  And this time, only one of them will walk away....

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
They weren't just born to kill.
They were born to rock your world....

"An exhilarating crime novel...there is no place to run for cover from this author's prose."
—The New York Times Book Review

"A story that grabs you almost by the throat...and never slackens its hold."
—The Denver Post

Pixel Planet
Hunter’s writing style is crisp and compact, and flies along. He has a knack for boiling things down to simple, effective phrases. He also has a great knack at dialogue....If you’ve read crime novels in the past but have become bored with the genre, Dirty White Boys may be the cure.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Often brilliant, and permeated by violence, Hunter's sixth thriller (after Point of Impact) details an escaped mad-dog killer's flight across the Southwest and a tortured state trooper's pursuit of him. Sadistic Lamar Pye is forced to break out of Oklahoma's McAlester State Penitentiary after he brutally murders a black inmate who tries to rape him. Pye takes with him his cousin, Odell, a retarded giant who obeys Pye's orders without question, and wimpy Richard Peed, an artist whose work has caught Pye's fancy. Pitted against this vicious trio and the slightly crazed woman who takes up with them is Sgt. Bud Pewtie of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, who suspects that his obsessive, troubled affair with the wife of his slain partner might have distracted him from an opportunity to end Pye's murderous spree early on. Pewtie mixes it up with the outlaws time and again until a final bloody face-off that threatens to tear his personal life apart. Throughout, Hunter cleverly humanizes Pye and his band in small ways that effectively counterpoint the horror of their actions, but these touches don't lessen the considerable tension he generates as his story clips through its twists and turns. Powerful and gripping, this could be Hunter's most popular novel yet. Movie rights to 20th Century Fox; Literary Guild selection. (Nov.)
Library Journal
After killing a black inmate, the brutal Lamar Pye breaks out of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary along with his retarded cousin, Odell, and a hapless artist-turned-felon named Richard. They embark on a desperate run across Oklahoma and Texas, pursued by state troopers. The escapees hide out with a convict groupie who has lived alone since murdering her parents as an adolescent. In a parody of domesticity, Lamar embraces these losers as the family he never knew. Unlettered Lamar is a natural leader, more intelligent by far than his pursuers, but his gang screws up every time at a terrible cost in bloodshed. Hunter's (Point of Impact, LJ 2/1/93) portrayal of Lamar is unromantic but sympathetic. Lamar is a loser who never had a chance; he uses his short period of freedom to get his own back and to indulge in the mindless violence that is the only thing that truly satisfies and delights him. This seriocomic chase thriller packs a punch. For most popular collections.-David Keymer, California State Univ., Stanislaus

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440221791
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/28/1995
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
496
Sales rank:
82,361
Product dimensions:
6.88(w) x 10.92(h) x 1.06(d)

What People are saying about this

John Sandford
An exceptional thriller.

Meet the Author

Stephen Hunter has written fifteen novels. The retired chief film critic for The Washington Post, where he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Criticism, he has also published two collections of film criticism and a nonfiction work. He lives in Maryland.

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Dirty White Boys 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 49 reviews.
SavageBS More than 1 year ago
Good action book! My 1st Stephen Hunter novel! Contrary to what other reviewers have said, this book is not really part of the Earl Swagger / Bobby Lee Swagger series. Earl Lee Swagger is mentioned once throughout the entire book. There are no prequels to read before you decide to read "Dirty White Boys" or after. "Dirty White Boys" is a good read, alot of action and great characters! The Pyes (Lamarr & Odell) are dirty white boys, poor white trash in every meaning of the words! They are ruthless killers & will stop at nothing to get what they want. The book is very well written and I was impressed with the (come full circle) type ending! You will be cheering on Trooper Bud Pewtie to catch Lamarr and Odell. The shootouts in the book are very well written and keep your full attention. Highly recommended, good reading~
Royce_Illinois More than 1 year ago
I really loved this book even though it was a little longer then most of Hunter's books. I was given this book by a friend a long time after I had read Black Light which is why it took be a long time into the book to make the parallel. Hunter kept alluding to both the hard and ruthless as well as the nurturing side of Lamar Pye and I couldn't figure out why this was so important to the storyline. Then finally it occurred to me that he has a very close connection with another character within this series. I love this aspect of this series, how everything is somehow connected.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When Lamar and his cousin Odell escape from prison with wimpy, pathetic Richard, prepare for a path of violence the likes of which you haven't seen in a long time. Lamar is the criminal version of good guy Earl Swagger of Hunters 'Hot Springs,' which is a book not to miss if you haven't already read it. Bud Pewtie, police sergeant from Oklahoma has the misfortune of going one on one against Lamar and comes within a microsecond of losing his life. He is bent on revenge in finding this brutal killer and the chase is on. You won't want to put this one down. Stephen Hunter has also written many other great novels, and every one is a great read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Another great book by Stephen Hunter, will keep you on the edge of your seat. You can relate to the human flaws of everyday life, and realize the fear and emotion of those fighting and those running.
junebugSM More than 1 year ago
I read this book because it was told to me by another reader who knows I like prison books. This book blew me away. It has some serious bad words, but nothing you never heard of. Actually its kinda calm more than in the prison itself. This has to do with 3 men out of Oklahoma on a prison escape. How they broke out, left the area, and headed on the highway to different towns. Odell ( the lower IQ) his cousin Lamar, and Richard, who seems to have had a shorter sentence and was soon to be released, but not anymore. They meet up with the state trooper, Bud Pewtie, and a few others, hanging out at the Denny's restaurant and just alot of O-K-corral shoot out. Folks dead, and alot hurt. Very good book if your interested in the prison stuff, and very good to read while we had so many break-outs during the July summer time....
RCCnLA More than 1 year ago
Steven Hunter admits there are 3 books that form a trilogy which provide a lot of the deep background for his Bob Lee Swagger character. This is a great read for fans, and I'm glad I figured out where this book fits in, because it isn't clearly promoted as part of the "Sniper" series. Don't expect hard core sniper grit as this is hard core bad guys who are institutional lifers out and about. Good depth and a change of pace from one of my favorite authors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read! I really like Hunter and this is his best yet. I could not put it down. You have to read the others of the Swagger series to find out the ending of this story. You wont be disapointed; they are all good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book fills in some questions about Earl Swagger's life and times and supplies a few nuggets of information that mostly fit in the series of Bob Lee Swagger's life and times (so far) from "Point of Impact" to "Dead Zero". The writing style is roughly the same (pun intended) and it is pure Stephen Hunter. If you like "Time to Hunt", or "I, Sniper", you are going to love "Dirty White Boys"! This book is a real page-turner and it's easy to read. But I like it because it supplies it's own ending!
SlapShot62 More than 1 year ago
This the first Hunter book I've ever read, and it won't be the last - I plan to start from book one of the Swagger series very soon.   From the opening of Dirty White Boys, the reader is hooked.  I've read some reviewers complain that the book is overly violent.  It is what it is - a great tale about a hardened convicted killer, his retarded cousin and a meek psycho and their escape from a state penitentiary.   As would likely occur thereafter, they ruthlessly attempt to remain free and will hurt or kill anyone in their path.  One cop on a mission - to the point of obsession - remains on their trail throughout.    Great writing, sharp characters and plenty of action.   This isn't a book for deep thinkers - it is escapism at its best!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
However once you start reading and your blood starts boiling, you be hard pressed to put this one down.
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Enjoyed this read, hero was capable law enforcement officer but flawed as a man... much like real life. His personal and professional struggles were equally engaging.
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