Disappearing Acts

Disappearing Acts

4.5 48
by Terry McMillan
     
 

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He was tall, dark as bittersweet chocolate, and impossibly gorgeous, with a woman-melting smile. She was pretty and independent, petite and not too skinny, just his type. Franklin Swift was a sometimes-employed construction worker, and a not-quite-divorced daddy of two. Zora Banks was a teacher, singer, songwriter. They met in a Brooklyn brownstone, and there

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Overview

He was tall, dark as bittersweet chocolate, and impossibly gorgeous, with a woman-melting smile. She was pretty and independent, petite and not too skinny, just his type. Franklin Swift was a sometimes-employed construction worker, and a not-quite-divorced daddy of two. Zora Banks was a teacher, singer, songwriter. They met in a Brooklyn brownstone, and there could be no walking away...

In this funny, gritty urban love story, Franklin and Zora join the ranks of fiction's most compelling couples, as they move from Scrabble to sex, from layoffs to the limits of faith and trust. Disappearing Acts is about the mystery of desire and the burdens of the past. It's about respect, what it can and can't survive. And it's about the safe and secret places that only love can find.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This is a story of love between Zora, an independent, aspiring singer, and Franklin, a sometimes-employed carpenter. Life has been unkind to these star-crossed lovers, but they're both survivors. Despite an abundance of flash and energy, this book lacks the depth and breadth to which McMillan aspires.
Library Journal
By the author of Mama (LJ 1/15/87), this second novel is a boy-meets-girl story from the black perspective. Franklin is an on-again, off-again construction worker trying to get his life on a firmer foundation. Zora is a music teacher and would-be singer. They meet and start a relationship that initially seems ideal. Soon, however, problems emerge. Franklin's ego has never recovered from his destructive mother's abuse, and the repeated blows the oppressive white society dishes out make him increasingly depressed and hostile. The relationship begins to fall apart. Zora and Franklin have to grow a long way alone before they can come back together. This easy-to-enjoy novel will certainly touch readers who identify with the situation. It's a pity that McMillan's lively narrative is marred by occasional woodenness and that she has a penchant for stating what should be inferred by the reader. Movie rights have been sold, so this could be a biggie.-- Janet Boyarin Blundell, Brookdale Community Coll., Lincroft, N.Y.
From the Publisher
"If Ntozake Shange, Jane Austen, and Danielle Steel collaborated on a novel of manners, [Disappearing Acts] might be the result." —New Yorker

"Contains someting increasingly rare in books or films today: a full-blown, sophisticated love affair between two African-American adults." —Denver Post

"A funny, earthy novel...ribaldly realistic. [Speaks] across class and color lines." —New York Newsday

"A down-to-earth portrayal of love, yearning, and self-preservation...brimming with energy and the hard facts of life." —Kansas City Star

"Gripping and moving...intensely realistic." —Cleveland Plain Dealer

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671708436
Publisher:
Washington Square Press
Publication date:
10/01/1990
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
5.33(w) x 8.27(h) x 1.14(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"If Ntozake Shange, Jane Austen, and Danielle Steel collaborated on a novel of manners, [Disappearing Acts] might be the result." —New Yorker

"Contains someting increasingly rare in books or films today: a full-blown, sophisticated love affair between two African-American adults." —Denver Post

"A funny, earthy novel...ribaldly realistic. [Speaks] across class and color lines." —New York Newsday

"A down-to-earth portrayal of love, yearning, and self-preservation...brimming with energy and the hard facts of life." —Kansas City Star

"Gripping and moving...intensely realistic." —Cleveland Plain Dealer

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