Disaster Communications in a Changing Media World

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Overview

Communications that supports disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery by disseminating accurate information to the general public, to elected officials and community leaders and the media reduces risk, saves lives and property, and speeds recovery. No longer an afterthought or a luxury, communications is now as important as logistics or the pre-deployment of materials. Planning and controlling the flow of information before, during, and after a disaster will define your agency's credibility, trustworthiness, authority and effectiveness.

The emergence of new media like the internet, e-mail, blogs, text messaging, cell phone photos and the increasing role played by ?first informers? ? witnesses who now have the ability to transmit information immediately from the event ? are redefining the roles of government and media. The government's historical role as gatekeeper is now an anachronism, and traditional media's role as the sole conduit of reliable and officially-sanctioned information has been eclipsed. The tools and rules of disaster communications are evolving and must capitalize on these changes and exploit the opportunities they provide. Imagine being able to deploy an army of bloggers to help convey an evacuation order during a wildfire, and report on the locations of new shelters as they open.

Even though the means to the end are evolving, the goals, the values, and the underlying principles of effective disaster communication ? the need for transparency, increased accessibility, trustworthiness and reliability, and to create partnerships with the media ? have not changed and need to be integrated with the practical ability to convey information effectively. This book teaches you how to communicate during a disaster and how to learn from the best and worst of recent history.

* Applies the principles of emergency management to communications during a disaster
* Covers terrorist incidents, accidents, and natural disasters like hurricanes and earthquakes
* Shows how to use blogs, text messages, and cell phone cameras as well as government channels and traditional media to communicate during a crisis

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This book defines the key elements of disaster communications with a focus on methods to achieve successful communications along with the principles that should carry the communications along."--Shannon Parker, St Louis University Institute for Biosecurity

"Although written for a government audience, this volume contains excellent, useful information readily adaptable to many of the media situations that frequently confront security practitioners…The authors write clearly and use checklists to facilitate understanding. In addition to the obvious crisis situations, the information provided is eminently useful in the development of a security supportive culture and awareness campaigns within an organization. Communicating the security message to our various audiences and earning their willing support and participation is essential to the success of a security organization. Given that most security professionals and police would rather walk into a dark alley searching for an armed felon than spend a minute in front of a camera and a microphone, this text is both necessary and timely."--Haddow Disaster Communications in a Changing Media World review in Security Management.com

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781856175548
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 10/29/2008
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 941,235
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Kim Haddow is the president of Haddow Communications in New Orleans - a company specializing in strategic media planning, messaging, and developing research-driven media content, branding and advertising materials for non-profits. Clients have included: the Rockefeller Family Fund, Sierra Club, Make It Right Foundation, U.S. State Department, Public Campaign, and the Trust for America’s Health. Haddow also worked for eight years at Greer, Margolis, Mitchell, Burns (GMMB), a Washington, DC- based media consulting firm, advising political campaigns and non-profits. Haddow began her career at WWL-AM in New Orleans where she managed the news department

George Haddow currently serves as an Adjunct Professor at the Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management at The George Washington University, Washington, DC and at the Homeland Security Studies at Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. Program. Prior to joining George Washington University, Mr. Haddow worked for eight years in the Office of the Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as the White House Liaison and the deputy Chief of Staff. He is a founding partner of Bullock and Haddow LLC, a disaster management consulting firm.

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Table of Contents

Chapter One - Communications: The Critical Function
Essential to success - best case examples where effective communications clearly contributed to the success of the operation - Northridge for response, Napa for mitigation; worst case examples where inadequate and inept communications planning and implementation costs lives, damaged response, or delayed recovery - Hurricane Katrina, the Loma Prieta earthquake.

Chapter Two - Disaster communications in a changing media world
Definition of new media, examples of use in disasters - Katrina, July 7 London bombing,
Examples of changing role of traditional media and government --9/11

Chapter Three - The Principles of a successful communications strategy
Basic assumptions and examples of each:
* Transparency
* Accuracy
* Accessibility
* Customer focus
* Leadership commitment
* Communications core to planning
* Partnership role with media
* Need to create emotional connection with audience, be trusted - Rudy Giuliani on September 11, Chief Moose in the DC sniper incident

Chapter Four - Application of principles to all four phases of disaster
* Mitigation
* Preparedness
* Response
* Recovery
* The challenges of communicating risk

Chapter Five - Identification of audiences
* Public
* Elected officials and community leaders
* Partners - public health, first responders, volunteers
* Media

Chapter Six - Creating infrastructure
* Staffing
* Tools and technologies

Chapter Seven - Working with the media
* How a newsroom works, staffing, deadlines,
* Ho

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