Disaster Recovery Planning for Nonprofits

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Overview

Disaster recovery planning, while not an entirely new concept, has gained increased attention since the events of September 11th and the formation of the Department of Homeland Security. The topic, however, has not become well rooted in the nonprofit community. Disaster Recovery Planning for Nonprofits is a unique and timely book that is geared specifically towards the nonprofit sector. This text lays the framework for organizations that wish to gain an understanding of current practices and want to form ...
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Overview

Disaster recovery planning, while not an entirely new concept, has gained increased attention since the events of September 11th and the formation of the Department of Homeland Security. The topic, however, has not become well rooted in the nonprofit community. Disaster Recovery Planning for Nonprofits is a unique and timely book that is geared specifically towards the nonprofit sector. This text lays the framework for organizations that wish to gain an understanding of current practices and want to form comprehensive disaster recovery plans for themselves. Not only does the book treat the various aspects of planning, it also presents a number of case histories and the practices being used by nonprofits as identified from a 2003 survey. Readers will find the strategies more process oriented rather than technologically based, which will enable executives, managers, and employees of nonprofit organizations to use the text as a springboard in the successful formation of their disaster recovery plans.
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Editorial Reviews

History News
... [the book] offers some relevant advice by finding the common denominator among nonprofit agencies as varied as museums, social service agencies, and grant foundations... Robinson's most important point is that all records, whether hard copy or electronic, are part of the heart of any organization, and that contingencies must be made for recovery for business to continue following a disaster like Katrina... According to Robinson, the speed of recovery for nonprofit institutions following a disaster isdirectly linked to the ability to restore these institutional records... Robinson states that nonprofits tend not to be driven by technology and he devotes a fair portion of the book to electronic sources. At first glance, this seems irrelevant, but for less computer savvy nonprofits, the information provides basic information on securing electronic information. Robinson points out that a loss from a breach in cyber-security can be just as damaging as any fire or flood. He mentions that basics such as securing computers, installing firewalls, and limiting the number of personnel who have access to sensitive records, simple measures that should be part of a nonprofit's day-to-day operations to effectively prevent or limit damage done by compromised or stol
— Virginia Bartos, Historic Preservation Program Analyst at the New York State Office of Parks
History News - Virginia Bartos
... [the book] offers some relevant advice by finding the common denominator among nonprofit agencies as varied as museums, social service agencies, and grant foundations... Robinson's most important point is that all records, whether hard copy or electronic, are part of the heart of any organization, and that contingencies must be made for recovery for business to continue following a disaster like Katrina... According to Robinson, the speed of recovery for nonprofit institutions following a disaster isdirectly linked to the ability to restore these institutional records... Robinson states that nonprofits tend not to be driven by technology and he devotes a fair portion of the book to electronic sources. At first glance, this seems irrelevant, but for less computer savvy nonprofits, the information provides basic information on securing electronic information. Robinson points out that a loss from a breach in cyber-security can be just as damaging as any fire or flood. He mentions that basics such as securing computers, installing firewalls, and limiting the number of personnel who have access to sensitive records, simple measures that should be part of a nonprofit's day-to-day operations to effectively prevent or limit damage done by compromised or stol
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761826606
  • Publisher: The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 11/20/2003
  • Pages: 114
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 0.27 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael K. Robinson is IT Director at Creative Direct Response and Adjunct Instructor at Anne Arundel Community College.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Preface Chapter 2 Introducing Nonprofits to Disaster Recovery: Getting Beyond the Initial Fear; Is the Need For a Disaster Recovery Plan Real?; The Basic Cycle of Events in Disaster and Recovery; Questions for Review and Implementation Chapter 3 Team Formation and Initial Plan Development: Moving Into High Gear; Protecting the Organization's Assets; Sharing Information; Disseminating Disaster Information: A Unique Twist on a Web Site; Don't Just Get Insurance, Talk to the Insurance Company; Chapter 4 Protecting Information and Functions: Document Backups: Hard or Electronic Copies?; Protecting the Organization's Records; Applicable Regulations; Protecting the Organization's Activities; Protecting Sources of Income; Backing Up Electronic Data; Qu Chapter 5 Risks: Inside and Out: Starting Points; Procedures; Computer Systems; Revenue Impact; Vendors and Partners; Questions for Review and Implementation Chapter 6 Implementation and Updates: Get the Word Out; Make Decisions in Advance; Purchase Redundant Equipment; Document Procedures and Plans; Off-Site Storage; On-Site Storage; Test the Plan; Update the System; Emergency Sites; Where to Go From Here; Questi Chapter 7 Appendix A: Nonprofit Survey Chapter 8 Appendix B: Disaster Recovery Planning Resources Chapter 9 Bibliography Chapter 10 About the Author Chapter 11 Index
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2004

    Are we really in that bad a shape?

    I found Robinson's book to be informative and somewhat disheartening. His appendix has a survey that shows that nonprofits aren't doing so well. The book was well written - I liked the side bars and practical examples. I just gave my IT department some added reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2003

    Excellent resource for nonprofits

    This book is a great resource for nonprofits developing their own disaster recovery plans. It's been a valuable to my nonprofit's non-technical employees because of the easy to read language. The book also has enough 'meat on the bones' so it satisfied our more tech-savvy people. The practical examples were worth while. I found the survey results enlightening (and a little scary).

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