Disasters of the Deep: A History of Submarine Tragedies

Overview

When originally published in 1986 as Few Survived, this book was the first complete record of submarine accidents. Sadly, since then there have been a number of further fatal disasters which now necessitate an updated and revised edition. Disasters of the Deep is, like its predecessor, very far from being merely a list of what was lost where, when and why, for Edwyn Gray, arguably the leading authority on the subject, examines the most important incidents in considerable detail, analysing what went wrong and ...
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Overview

When originally published in 1986 as Few Survived, this book was the first complete record of submarine accidents. Sadly, since then there have been a number of further fatal disasters which now necessitate an updated and revised edition. Disasters of the Deep is, like its predecessor, very far from being merely a list of what was lost where, when and why, for Edwyn Gray, arguably the leading authority on the subject, examines the most important incidents in considerable detail, analysing what went wrong and describing the attempts made at rescuing the crew and/or the vessel. In this way he effectively traces the development of the submarine from the earliest experimental submersibles of the late eighteenth century down to the nuclear-powered leviathans of today, describing in parallel the developments of underwater rescue operations and survival techniques.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591142140
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/2003
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Table of Contents

Author's Note vii
1 'Give us air!' 1
2 'Into perpetual night.' 18
3 'The best tradition of the Service.' 37
4 'They feel very cold.' 57
5 'Overdue and presumed lost.' 74
6 'When in doubt--dive!' 91
7 'A trifling mistake ...' 103
8 'Slow torture as well as death.' 119
9 'Hi, fellas. Here we are.' (USS Squalus) 138
10 'We couldn't open the hatch.' (HMS Thetis) 154
11 'Here we go for 14 days survivor's leave.' 172
12 'We are at the north end of Hurd Deep.' 191
13 'Gertrude ... Check K.' 206
14 'Don't lose hope!' 229
15 Affray, the last word 250
16 'Deliver us, O Lord.' 257
Appendices
1 Pioneer and experimental submarines lost before 1 January 1900 267
2 Naval submarines lost by accident or error since 1900 269
3 Submarine losses from 1 January 1900 to 31 July 1914 284
4 Submarine losses from 1 August 1914 to 11 November 1918 285
5 Submarine losses from 12 November 1918 to 31 August 1939 286
6 Submarine losses from 1 September 1939 to 2 September 1945 287
7 3 September 1945 to 31 December 2001 289
8 World Submarine losses 290
Index 291
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2006

    not accurate, poorly referenced

    This book is claimed by many to be one of the definitive sources on this topic. However, the many errors in this book made it difficult to finish. I'll give only 2 examples. The author describes the crew members of the BAP Pacocha being 'rescued 2 at a time in a diving bell almost exactly like the Squalus'. This never happened. There was no diving bell associated with the Pacocha. They escaped to the surface and all had to be treated for serious decompression illness, one of whom died, while others died from hypothermia on the surface. The US 'McMann Bell' began to respond but was recalled after the crew initiated their escapes. He describes the USS Scorpion as being sunk by it's own torpedo. This was initially listed as a possibility. However, read the recently published and wonderfully referenced book 'Silent Steel' and you'll see a more accurate description. This book is an OK resource, poorly referenced from what appears to not be the source documents, but newspapers.

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