Discourses Of Epictetus

Discourses Of Epictetus

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by Epictetus
     
 

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Epictetus, a great philosopher taught the importance of control over one's own mind and will, for true happiness must not depend on things one cannot control. Unlike most philosophers, Epictetus taught not for the select few, but for the many and humble. This edition contains all 4 books.See more details below

Overview

Epictetus, a great philosopher taught the importance of control over one's own mind and will, for true happiness must not depend on things one cannot control. Unlike most philosophers, Epictetus taught not for the select few, but for the many and humble. This edition contains all 4 books.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781595479730
Publisher:
NuVision Publications
Publication date:
09/19/2006
Pages:
316
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.71(d)

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CHAPTER II HOW A MAN ON EVERY OCCASION CAN MAINTAIN HIS PROPER CHARACTER TO the rational animal only is the irrational intolerable; but that which is rational is tolerable. Blows are not naturally intolerable. How is that? See how the Lacedaemonians1 endure whipping when they have learned that whipping is consistent with reason. To hang yourself is not intolerable. When then you have the opinion that it is rational, you go and hang yourself. In short, if we observe, we shall find that the animal man is pained by nothing so much as by that which is irrational; and, on the contrary, attracted to nothing so much as to that which is rational. But the rational and the irrational appear in a different way to different persons, just as the good and the bad, the profitable and the unprofitable. For this reason, particularly, we need discipline, in order to learn how to adapt the preconception of the rational and the irrational to the several things comformably to nature. But in order to determine the rational and the irrational, we use not only the estimates of external things, but we consider also what is appropriate to each person. For to one man it is consistent with reason to hold a chamber pot for another, and to look to this only, that if he does not hold it, he will receive stripes, and he will not receive his food: but if he shall hold the pot, he will not suffer anything hard or disagreeable. But to another man not only does the holding of a chamber pot appear intolerable for himself, but intolerable also for him to allow another to do this office for him. If then you ask me whether you should hold the chamber pot or not, I shall say to you that the receiving of food is worthmore than the not receiving of it, and the being scourged is a greater indignity than not bei...

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