Discoveries: A Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Paragraphs and Essays / Edition 1

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2005 Paperback New clean, tight, unmarked (Fine), A process-driven basic rhetoric with handbook, Discoveries gives students the guidance, practice, and confidence they need to ... write successful paragraphs and essays. The authors' steady step-by-step approach provides a firm footing for basic writers, presenting the writing process for each assignment as clearly sequenced skills that students can master incrementally. All orders are shipped by kbooks every business day. Read more Show Less

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Overview


A process-driven basic rhetoric with handbook, Discoveries gives students the guidance, practice, and confidence they need to write successful paragraphs and essays. The authors' steady step-by-step approach provides a firm footing for basic writers, presenting the writing process for each assignment as clearly sequenced skills that students can master incrementally.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312390655
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 8/30/2005
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 752
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author


KATE MANGELSDORF is professor of English and director of rhetoric and developmental English at the University of Texas at El Paso, where she has also been director of composition and associate dean of University College. She was formerly coordinator of ESL writing at the University of Arizona and she has also taught at Yavapai Community College. Mangelsdorf has published articles in the Journal of Second Language Writing, English Language Teaching Journal, and Teaching English in the Two Year College, and she has contributed chapters to a number of books, including Two-Year College English: Essays for a New Century, A Sense of Audience in Written Communication, and Writing in Multicultural Settings.

EVELYN POSEY is the Dorrance D. Roderick Endowed Professor and chair of the department of English at the University of Texas at El Paso. She has served as an associate vice president for instructional design and technology integration, associate dean in the College of Liberal Arts, director of English education in the department of English, and director of the West Texas Writing Project (a site of the National Writing Project). She has also taught at El Paso Community College. Posey has published articles in Computers and Composition, the Journal of Business and Technical Communication, the Journal of Developmental Education, Teaching English in the Two-Year College, and the Writing Center Journal.

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Table of Contents


n.b. Chapters 4-11 follow the same general structure as Chapter 3, and Chapters 14-16 follow the same general structure as Chapter 13. For the sake of brevity, the full structure is not given for each chapter.

1. Discovering Writing
Writing Assignment Reading to Improve Your Writing Patterns of Writing
Example
Narration
Description
Process Explanation
Classification
Comparison and Contrast
Definition
Cause and Effect
Argument
Understanding the Writing Process
Additional Writing Assignments

PART I. WRITING PARAGRAPHS
2. A Step-by-Step Guide to the Writing Process
Understanding Paragraphs Writing Assignment Step 1. Discover Ideas for Writing
Choosing a Topic
Considering Your Audience
Considering Your Purpose
Writing to Express: Cheryl Peck, from Fat Girls and Lawn Chairs
Writing to Inform: Neil Strauss, from "Necessary Springsteen Keeps theFaith"
Writing to Persuade: Jody Albert, from "Avoid Dryden Hall"
Gathering Ideas
Brainstorming
Freewriting
Clustering
Interviewing
Outlining
Narrowing Your Topic
Step 2. Write Your Discovery Draft
Drafting a Topic Sentence
Adding Support
Drafting a Concluding Sentence
Krikor's Discovery Draft
Step 3. Revise Your Paragraph
Strengthening Focus
Building Support
Organizing Points
Topic-Illustration-Explanation Order: Rebecca Thomas Kirkendall, from "Who's a Hillbilly?"
Chronological or Sequential Order: Andre Dubus, from "Under the Lights"
Progressive Order: Martin Luther King, Jr., from "I Have a Dream"
Directional Order: Brent Staples, from Parallel Time: Growing up in Black and White
Question-and-Answer Order: Brian Caulfield, from "How to Turn Grease into Gold"
Krikor's Revised Draft
Step 4. Edit Your Paragraph
Krikor's Edited Draft
Keeping an Editing Log
Step 5. Share Your Paragraph Additional Writing Assignments

3. Writing a Paragraph That Gives Examples
Understanding Examples Reading Paragraphs That Give Examples
A Memorable Place: Jonathan Gold, from "The World's Greatest Street Food"
A Memorable Day: Lara Flynn Boyle, from "My Favorite Dayin Chicago"
Writing Assignment Step 1. Discover Ideas for Writing
Choosing a Topic
Considering Your Audience and Purpose
Brainstorming to Gather Ideas
Narrowing Your Topic
Step 2. Write Your Discovery Draft
Drafting a Topic Sentence
Adding Support with Examples
Drafting a Concluding Sentence
Naresh's Discovery Draft
Step 3. Revise Your Paragraph
Strengthening Your Focus
Building Your Support with Stronger Examples
Using Topic-Illustration-Explanation to Organize Your Points
Naresh's Revised Draft
Step 4. Edit Your Paragraph
What Is a Sentence Fragment?
Correcting Sentence Fragments
Naresh's Edited Paragraph
Step 5. Share Your Paragraph Additional Writing Assignments

4. Writing a Paragraph That Tells a Story
Understanding Narration Reading Paragraphs That Tell a Story
A Friend's Help: Helen Keller, from The Story of My Life
An Event Shared with a Friend: Steve Tesich, from "Focusing on Friends"
Writing Assignment

5. Writing a Paragraph That Describes
Understanding Description Reading Paragraphs That Describe
An Interesting Animal: Jane and Michael Stern, from "Dog Show"
An Interesting Place: Doris Haddock, from Granny D
Writing Assignment

6. Writing a Paragraph That Explains a Process
Understanding Process Explanation Reading Paragraphs That Explain a Process
How to Do Something: Robert Rowley, "How to Service Your Swamp Cooler"
How Something Works: Richard Preston, from "The Demon in the Freezer"
Writing Assignment

7. Writing a Paragraph That Classifies
Understanding Classification Reading Paragraphs That Classify
Classifying Services: Ursula Wagener, from "It Takes a Community to Educate Students"
Classifying People: E.B. White,"The Three New Yorks"
Writing Assignment

8. Writing a Paragraph That Compares and Contrasts
Understanding Comparison and Contrast Reading Paragraphs That Compare and Contrast
College: Frank McCourt, from 'Tis
Career Advice: Leo Buscaglia, from Papa's Ritual
Writing Assignment

9. Writing a Paragraph That Defines
Understanding Definition Reading Paragraphs That Define an Idea
Identity: Vickie Nam, from "Orientation: Finding the Way Home"
A Career Term: David K. Shipler, from The Working Poor: Invisible in America
Writing Assignment

10. Writing a Paragraph That Shows Cause and Effect
Understanding Cause and Effect Reading Paragraphs That Show Cause and Effect
The Cause of a Destructive Behavior: Pete Hamill, from "Crack and the Box"
The Effect of a Destructive Behavior: Jane Brody, from "The Hangover"
Writing Assignment

11. Writing a Paragraph That Makes an Argument
Understanding Argumentation Reading Paragraphs That Make an Argument
Against Computers: Sam Smith, from "The Luddites at Microsoft: Making Machines that Smash Themselves"
For Computers: David Patterson et al., from Computing Unbound
Writing Assignment

PART II. READING AND WRITING ESSAYS
12. Moving from Paragraphs to Essays
Understanding Essays
College Success: Charles Smith, "Running Out of Money Before Graduation"
Writing Assignment Step 1. Discover Ideas for Writing
Choosing a Topic
Considering Your Audience and
Purpose
Gathering Ideas
Keeping a Journal
Narrowing Your Topic
Step 2. Write a Discovery Draft
Drafting a Thesis Statement
Drafting an Introduction
Adding Support
Drafting a Conclusion
Daniel's Discovery Draft
Step 3. Revise Your Essay
Strengthening Your Focus
Building Support
Organizing Your Points
Connecting Your Ideas
Daniel's Revised Draft
Step 4. Edit Your Essay
Daniel's Edited Essay
Daniel's Editing Log
Step 5. Share Your Essay
Additional Writing Assignments

13. Writing an Essay That Gives Examples
Understanding Examples Reading Essays That Give Examples
Adapting to Change: Jan Zeh, "The 'Golden Years' Are Beginning to Tarnish"
Making a Change: B.C., "Homeless in Prescott, Arizona"
Writing Assignment Step 1. Discover Ideas for Writing
Choosing a Topic
Considering Your Audience and Purpose
Freewriting to Gather Ideas
Narrowing Your Topic
Step 2. Write Your Discovery Draft
Drafting a Tentative Thesis Statement
Drafting an Introduction
Adding Support with Details
Drafting a Conclusion
Damariz's Discovery Draft
Step 3. Revise Your Essay
Strengthening Your Focus
Building Your Support with Process Explanation
Using TIE to Organize Your Points
Connecting Your Ideas
Damariz's Revised Draft
Step 4. Edit Your Essay
What Is Sentence Coordination?
Combining Sentences with Coordinating Conjunctions
Damariz's Edited Essay
Step 5. Share Your Essay
Additional Writing Assignments

14. Writing an Essay That Tells aStory
Understanding Narration Reading Essays That Tell a Story
Explaining a Career Choice: Gavin de Becker, "Why I Fight Abuse"
A Life-Changing Job: Marshall Glickman, "Money and Freedom"
Writing Assignment

15. Writing an Essay That Compares and Contrasts
Understanding Comparison and Contrast Reading Essays That Compare and Contrast
People in the Media: Patricia Raybon, "A Case of 'Severe Bias'"
Things in the Media: Sarah Stage, "Better Living Through Electricity"
Writing Assignment

16. Writing an Essay That Makes an Argument
Understanding Argumentation Reading Essays That Make an Argument
Arguing a Position: Wilbert Rideau, "Why Prisons Don't Work"
Proposing a Solution: Steven Muller, "Our Youth Should Serve"
Writing Assignment

PART III. OTHER KINDS OF WRITING
17. Keeping a Journal
Understanding What a Journal Is Using Journals to Improve Writing Keeping Different Types of Journals Additional Writing Assignments

18. Taking Essay Exams
Understanding What an Essay Exam Is Preparing for an Essay Exam Taking an Essay Exam Additional Writing Assignments

19. Writing a Summary
Understanding What a Summary Paragraph Is Using Summary Paragraphs Writing Summary Paragraphs Additional Writing Assignments

20. Using Sources in Your Writing
Understanding What Sources Are Knowing When to Use Sources in Your Writing Focusing Your Search for Sources Using Keywords Finding Sources in the Library Finding Sources on the World Wide Web Evaluating Sources Avoiding Plagiarism Taking Notes Using Sources to Support Your Main Ideas Documenting Sources Sample Essay That Uses Sources: Shannon Stein (student), "Five More Minutes?"
Additional Writing Assignments

PART IV. IMPROVING GRAMMAR AND STYLE
21. Formatting Paragraphs and Essays
A. Definition of a Paragraph B. Definition of an Essay

22. Writing Sentences
A. Subjects B. Verbs C. Subject-Verb Agreement

23. Expanding Sentences
A. Phrases B. Clauses C. Pronouns D. Adjectives E. Adverbs

24. Joining Sentences
A. Coordination B. Subordination C. Sentence Combining Exercises

25 Improving Sentences
A. Sentence Fragments B. Run-on Sentences C. Comma Splices D. Misplaced Modifiers E. Dangling Modifiers F. Active and Passive Voice G. Parallelism

26. Improving Word Choice
A. Vocabulary B. Unnecessary Repetition C. Wordiness

27. Improving Spelling
A. Spelling Rules B. Commonly Misspelled Words C. Commonly Confused Words D. Using a Dictionary

28. Improving Punctuation
A. Commas B. Semicolons C. Colons D. End Punctuation E. Apostrophes F. Quotation Marks

29. Improving Mechanics
A. Capital Letters B. Italics C. Abbreviations D. Numbers

30. Guide for Multilingual Writers
A. Articles B. Count and Noncount Nouns C. Prepositions D. Omitted or Repeated Subjects E. Word Order F. Verbs

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