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Disease-Hunting Scientist: Careers Hunting Deadly Diseases
     

Disease-Hunting Scientist: Careers Hunting Deadly Diseases

by Edward Willett
 

Working from high-tech labs in Canada or remote villages in Africa, epidemiologists travel the world trying to keep us safe from deadly diseases. Learn how these "disease detectives" are coming up with new ways to fight disease, and find out if you have what it takes to become an epidemiologist, too!

Overview

Working from high-tech labs in Canada or remote villages in Africa, epidemiologists travel the world trying to keep us safe from deadly diseases. Learn how these "disease detectives" are coming up with new ways to fight disease, and find out if you have what it takes to become an epidemiologist, too!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - RevaBeth Russell
"Science is a verb." that is what science teachers tell their students, and this book describes just that. I found the book to be an exciting collection of seven scientists doing their jobs, and sometimes I was jealous. As scientist, Marta Guerra, describes, "for people who like to do fairly exciting things� you feel like you are actually helping people, [disease hunting in Uganda] is a wonderful experience." The book is scientifically accurate, and, with a bird flu expert hinting about new emerging pandemics, the book is very current. It is engaging and packed with a great deal of information. The Levels of Containment that we often read about describes measles as a level two disease, where gloves, face protection, gowns, and splash guards are used. It is a good thing that our mothers never knew that. For your information, E. coli is only level one. If you did not know what bat guano is, the explanation is seamlessly woven into the text. Zoonotic is a word I have been hearing more about, and this book teaches young readers what it means: diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans. Scientist Laurie Richardson says that "being a scientist is like being a kid all you life" because there is so much fun and learning to do. Scientist Jonathan Runstadler's job is to track the bird flu. To do that, he swabs bird bottoms, which may not sound like fun, but, for people such as me, it beats sitting in a cubical working on spreadsheets. This is a great read. Reviewer: RevaBeth Russell
School Library Journal
Gr 4–8—Subjects pulled from the headlines are the focus of these books. Each chapter focuses on a person and highlights the drama and drudgery that combine to provide a clear picture of the career. The day-to-day experiences along with the educational requirements are included in the clear, easy-to-read texts. These books present a more in-depth look than Diane Lindsey Reeves's Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Science (Facts On File, 1998). Full-color photographs show the scientists in action and a chart with career information including salary potentials wraps up each book. These accessible portraits will open readers' eyes to a variety of fields that they might considered.—Christine Markley, Washington Elementary School, Barto, PA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780766030527
Publisher:
Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/01/2009
Series:
Wild Science Careers Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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