Dismantling Democratic States / Edition 1

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Overview

"This is a first-rate book. In it, Ezra Suleiman, perhaps the academic world's most established expert on the politics of administration, takes on the most influential movement to affect government since the innovation of politically independent bureaucracies: 'New Public Management'. Not only is this book an important contribution to debates on public policy reform, as well as to the literature on democratic transitions, but it has a real political importance that goes beyond the academy. It is essential that the arguments made by Suleiman reach the eyes and ears of those responsible for public policy."—Harvey Feigenbaum, George Washington University, coauthor of Shrinking the State

"This is an important book that is not afraid to address big and important questions. It should be widely read."—Bert A. Rockman, The Ohio State University, coauthor of In the Web of Politics

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Editorial Reviews

Virginia Quarterly Review - Spencer D. Bakich
Suleiman demonstrates precisely how legitimacy requires bureaucracy that is effective and how new and old democracies alike require bureaucracies at each stage of development. . . . This is an important work and should be considered by those concerned with the proper functioning of democratic states.
The Washington Post - Jim Hoagland
The relentless and prolonged assault by politicians and the public on the competence and motives of their government bureaucracies is slowly but surely undermining democracy in the Americas and Europe. . . . The book arrives during a moment of particularly nasty relations between major parts of Washington's bureaucracy and a conservative Republican president who bemoans having to live and work here. This is a happy accident of timing. The book has no partisan ax to grind, and its insights could be useful to the Bush administration—both at home and in its unexpected bonanza of nation-building projects abroad.
From the Publisher
"In this powerful defense of the modern bureaucratic state, Suleiman argues that decades of attacks on government bureaucracy by Western politicians have undermined their own authority, weakened citizenship, and imperiled democratic governance. . . . Suleiman acknowledges that a leaner, more efficient state may be necessary today, but he makes a compelling case for the continuing necessity of the bureaucratic machine."—Foreign Affairs

"Suleiman demonstrates precisely how legitimacy requires bureaucracy that is effective and how new and old democracies alike require bureaucracies at each stage of development. . . . This is an important work and should be considered by those concerned with the proper functioning of democratic states."—Spencer D. Bakich, Virginia Quarterly Review

"The relentless and prolonged assault by politicians and the public on the competence and motives of their government bureaucracies is slowly but surely undermining democracy in the Americas and Europe. . . . The book arrives during a moment of particularly nasty relations between major parts of Washington's bureaucracy and a conservative Republican president who bemoans having to live and work here. This is a happy accident of timing. The book has no partisan ax to grind, and its insights could be useful to the Bush administration—both at home and in its unexpected bonanza of nation-building projects abroad."—Jim Hoagland, The Washington Post

Foreign Affairs
In this powerful defense of the modern bureaucratic state, Suleiman argues that decades of attacks on government bureaucracy by Western politicians have undermined their own authority, weakened citizenship, and imperiled democratic governance. . . . Suleiman acknowledges that a leaner, more efficient state may be necessary today, but he makes a compelling case for the continuing necessity of the bureaucratic machine.
Virginia Quarterly Review
Suleiman demonstrates precisely how legitimacy requires bureaucracy that is effective and how new and old democracies alike require bureaucracies at each stage of development. . . . This is an important work and should be considered by those concerned with the proper functioning of democratic states.
— Spencer D. Bakich
The Washington Post
The relentless and prolonged assault by politicians and the public on the competence and motives of their government bureaucracies is slowly but surely undermining democracy in the Americas and Europe. . . . The book arrives during a moment of particularly nasty relations between major parts of Washington's bureaucracy and a conservative Republican president who bemoans having to live and work here. This is a happy accident of timing. The book has no partisan ax to grind, and its insights could be useful to the Bush administration—both at home and in its unexpected bonanza of nation-building projects abroad.
— Jim Hoagland
Foreign Affairs
In this powerful defense of the modern bureaucratic state, Suleiman argues that decades of attacks on government bureaucracy by Western politicians have undermined their own authority, weakened citizenship, and imperiled democratic governance. The remarkable spectacle of leaders denigrating the very institutions they were elected to run reinforces the view that bureaucracy is wasteful, parasitic, and unaccountable. Reform movements, in turn, have championed privatization and decentralization. Suleiman chronicles the resulting deprofessionalization and politicization of public bureaucracies, while emphasizing the relationship between efficient bureaucracy and democratic governance. The modern democratic state, he argues, has depended on the simultaneous construction of a professional civil service. All the great endeavors of Western democratic polities — public education, democratic procedures, the conduct of war, the welfare state — have required complex, highly organized, and nonpolitical public administration. Suleiman acknowledges that a leaner, more efficient state may be necessary today, but he makes a compelling case for the continuing necessity of the bureaucratic machine.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691122519
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/5/2005
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 344
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Ezra Suleiman is IBM Professor of International Studies, Professor of Politics, and Director of the European Studies Program at Princeton University. He is the author or coauthor of over ten books in comparative politics.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Ch. 1 The End of Bureaucracy? 13
Ch. 2 Beyond Weber? 21
Ch. 3 New Conceptions of Bureaucracy, Democracy, and Citizenship 41
Ch. 4 Popular Dissatisfaction and Administrative Reform 63
Ch. 5 Universalistic Reforms 89
Ch. 6 Emulating the Private Sector 123
Ch. 7 The Reluctant Reformers: Japan and France 155
Ch. 8 Deprofessionalization: The Decline of the Civil Service Career 191
Ch. 9 Deprofessionalization: The Process of Politicization 209
Ch. 10 The End of the Nonpolitical Bureaucracy 241
Ch. 11 Constructing a Bureaucratic Apparatus in East-Central Europe 279
Ch. 12 The Politics of Bureaucratic Reform 305
Index 317
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