Disney, Pixar, and the Hidden Messages of Children's Films
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Disney, Pixar, and the Hidden Messages of Children's Films

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by M. Keith Booker
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0313376727

ISBN-13: 9780313376726

Pub. Date: 11/30/2009

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated

This work is a wide-ranging survey of American children's film that provides detailed analysis of the political implications of these films, as well as a discussion of how movies intended for children have come to be so persistently charged with meaning.

• Provides chapter-by-chapter coverage of films from different studios, including two chapters on Disney,

Overview

This work is a wide-ranging survey of American children's film that provides detailed analysis of the political implications of these films, as well as a discussion of how movies intended for children have come to be so persistently charged with meaning.

• Provides chapter-by-chapter coverage of films from different studios, including two chapters on Disney, one on Pixar, and one on films from other studios (with a special focus on Dreamworks)

• Offers bibliographical listings of both printed works cited and films cited in the text

• Includes a comprehensive index

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313376726
Publisher:
Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/30/2009
Pages:
214
Sales rank:
1,064,459
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

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Disney, Pixar, and the Hidden Messages of Children's Films 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Sarah-Sophia More than 1 year ago
This book points out some of the good, but mostly bad in children's film. It points out things that I never noticed before; like how an infatuation with animals can be a distraction to the suffering of people, and that if there is a progressive message, it is very much downplayed. Instead of accusing the film-makers of purposely trying to promote political views, the author claims that "they were simply careless, not bothering to worry that they might be conveying such ideas...The company was so focused on its own white, male, middle-class perspective."