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A Display of Arminianism
     

A Display of Arminianism

by John Owen
 

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In March 1642 John Owen’s first literary production was published; it dealt with the atonement, a subject to which he was to return in several of his later works. This first treatise, entitled A Display of Arminianism, is a simple comparison of the tenets of that system with the teaching of Scripture. This was by no means an academic task for when Owen wrote

Overview

In March 1642 John Owen’s first literary production was published; it dealt with the atonement, a subject to which he was to return in several of his later works. This first treatise, entitled A Display of Arminianism, is a simple comparison of the tenets of that system with the teaching of Scripture. This was by no means an academic task for when Owen wrote the Reformed character of the English church was seriously in jeopardy through the activity of Laud

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012191236
Publisher:
New Century Books
Publication date:
03/17/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
795,369
File size:
175 KB

Meet the Author

Oliver Cromwell liked Owen and took him as his chaplain on his expeditions both to Ireland and Scotland (1649-1651). Owen's fame was at its height from 1651 to 1660 when he played a prominent part in the religious, political, and academic life of the nation. Appointed dean of Christ Church, Oxford, in 1651, he became also vice-chancellor of the university in 1652, a post he held for five years with great distinction and with a marked impartiality not often found in Puritan divines. This led him also to disagreement, even with Cromwell, over the latter's assumption of the protectorship. Owen retained his deanery until 1659. Shortly after the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, he moved to London, where he was active in preaching and writing until his death. He declined invitations to the ministry in Boston (1663) and the presidency of Harvard (1670) and chided New England Congregationalists for intolerance. He turned aside also from high preferment when his influence was acknowledged by governmental attempts to persuade him to relinquish Nonconformity in favor of the established church.

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