Distributional Archaeology

Distributional Archaeology

by James I. Ebert
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0826313507

ISBN-13: 9780826313508

Pub. Date: 04/01/1992

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

Archaeology is founded implicitly on the concept of the site, making a careful distinction between sealed sites -- presumed to have complete temporal integrity -- and the surface record, which is generally considered to be without chronological resolution. While most American archaeologists focus on reconstructing events and episodes at camps, pueblos, and villages,

Overview

Archaeology is founded implicitly on the concept of the site, making a careful distinction between sealed sites -- presumed to have complete temporal integrity -- and the surface record, which is generally considered to be without chronological resolution. While most American archaeologists focus on reconstructing events and episodes at camps, pueblos, and villages, Jim Ebert questions this distinction. Instead he characterizes the archaeological record as an accumulation of many human events superim-posed upon each other across time and distance.

Using the results of work conducted in the Seedskadee area of southwestern Wyoming as a model for a distributional approach, Ebert discusses human settlement and mobility, subsistence and technological strategies, ethnoarchaeology, Great Basin ethnohistory, field survey methods, formation processes, and spatial analytical approaches. He concludes that data collection and analysis that are explicitly nonsite can be utilized to arrive at a different archaeological record based on varying scales and distributions of the actual, definable physical items occurring across large, contiguous landscapes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826313508
Publisher:
University of New Mexico Press
Publication date:
04/01/1992
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
312

Table of Contents

List of Figuresix
List of Tablesxi
Preface, 2001xiii
Preface, 1992xvii
Acknowledgmentsxix
1Many Archaeologies, Two Archaeological Records3
2Explanatory Frameworks in Contemporary Archaeology15
3Toward a Distributional Archaeological Method45
4Great Basin Adaptive Systems Interpreted by Archaeologists75
5Great Basin Adaptive Systems Interpreted by Ethnographers103
6Alternative Systems, Their Components, and Their Expression in the Archaeological Record127
7Distributional Fieldwork: An Example from Southwestern Wyoming157
8Exploring Scales of Patterning in the Archaeological Record with Distributional Data173
9Beyond Survey Archaeology245
Appendix ALithic Data Coding Form255
References261
Index287

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