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Diving to a Deep-Sea Volcano
     

Diving to a Deep-Sea Volcano

by Kenneth Mallory
 

Scientists have mapped less than 10 percent of the ridge of underwater mountains in the middle of the Atlantic ocean. It is here that 95 percent of the volcanic activity on earth occurs. And it is also where the scientist Rich Lutz has tracked the remarkable evolution of bizarre creatures that spawn in hydrothermal vent fluids that are poisonous to most other forms

Overview

Scientists have mapped less than 10 percent of the ridge of underwater mountains in the middle of the Atlantic ocean. It is here that 95 percent of the volcanic activity on earth occurs. And it is also where the scientist Rich Lutz has tracked the remarkable evolution of bizarre creatures that spawn in hydrothermal vent fluids that are poisonous to most other forms of life. How can life exist in this world of utter darkness?

For Rich Lutz, a pioneer in marine biology, each dive to the frontier of the deep holds the possibility of discovering more clues that might help us learn how life on earth began after our planet was formed billions of years ago.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
A balanced mixture of biography and science that gives children a well-rounded exposure to intellectual pursuit. Enthusiastic text expresses a sense of adventure and effectively depicts the thrill of new discoveries. . . . A general purchase for libraries with a significant science readership.
School Library Journal
Children's Literature - Judy Crowder
What comes to mind when you think of the ocean's bottom? A vast, sandy waste, somewhat like an underwater desert or moon surface? That was certainly the common impression before humankind developed the means with which to explore the sea. With the advent of submersibles, such as the Alvin at Wood Hole, scientists are discovering that the ocean floor is made up of deep canyons, mountain ranges, and undersea hydrothermal vents, even undersea volcanoes. This book, part of the "Scientists in the Field" series, follows Rich Lutz, a mollusk expert, who studied clams and mussels in the deep ocean. In the 1990's he and other scientists joined an expedition, nicknamed "The Magical Mystery Tour," which explored hydrothermal vents and sites of underwater volcanoes around the globe. The experience of spiraling down into the abyss in this relatively small craft was life-changing—Lutz has been involved in undersea exploration ever since. He discovered three giant chimneys, called smokers, and got to name them after his children. Then he named a particularly beautiful hydrothermal vent after his wife. One of the most exciting—and dangerous—adventures was finding himself, and the Alvin, in the midst of a volcanic eruption! This is a breathtaking book, full to bursting with technical information on submersibles, deep sea life, geographic formations, every aspect of underwater exploration. plus priceless illustrations. This well-written, beautifully formatted book would be a welcome, valuable addition to a high school or college marine science class, as well as to a private or public library. The volume includes an extensive glossary, list of readings, and an index.
School Library Journal
Gr 4–8
Mallory follows marine biologist Rich Lutz as he travels in a research submarine to study hydrothermal vents and describes his investigation into the regrowth of an underwater habitat after it is devastated by a volcanic eruption. In keeping with other volumes in the series, the author provides a balanced mixture of biography and science that gives children a well-rounded exposure to intellectual pursuit. Enthusiastic text expresses a sense of adventure and effectively depicts the thrill of new discoveries. At times, the numerous biological terms and concepts may be challenging for newcomers and struggling readers, but students with developed interests will find them attention-grabbing. Readers less interested in hard science will be intrigued by the look at the different vehicles and equipment used to carry out these explorations, and will be particularly drawn in by the last section on the making of an IMAX film. Large, colorful photographs and diagrams illustrate species and biological principles. A general purchase for libraries with a significant science readership.
—Michael SantangeloCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This newest entry in the essential Scientists in the Field series takes readers to some of the lowest points on the planet-thousands of feet below the ocean's surface, where colonies of eldritch-looking tube worms and other denizens thrive around sunless, hydrothermal vents that are more times hotter than boiling temperature. Backed up by plenty of color photos, maps and artists' conceptions, the tour follows both an IMAX film crew and the research of marine biologist Rich Lutz. The latter offers a unique perspective, because in 1991 a site in the Pacific known as Nine North was utterly devastated by a volcanic eruption, and Lutz has been studying the stages and cycles of its biological community's recovery ever since. Closing with the tantalizing observation that scientists have charted less than one percent of the ocean's floor, Mallory will leave young readers with a both a better understanding of this unique ecological niche and a sense of wonder about the many mysteries yet to be uncovered. (multimedia resource list) (Nonfiction. 10-13)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618332052
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/02/2006
Series:
Scientists in the Field Series
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
896,482
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.39(d)
Lexile:
1250L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Kenneth Mallory, former editor in chief of publishing programs at Boston’s New England Aquarium, writes, edits, and photographs for magazines, newspapers, Web pages, book publishers, and museum exhibits, especially in the field of natural history. He lives in Massachusetts.

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