Overview

While computers and other devices identify each other on networks or the Internet by using unique addresses made up of numbers, humans rely on the Domain Name System (DNS), the distributed database that allows us to identify machines by name. DNS does the work of translating domain names into numerical IP addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and many other services, so that users require little or no knowledge of the system. If you're a network or system administrator, however, configuring, ...

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DNS on Windows Server 2003

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Overview

While computers and other devices identify each other on networks or the Internet by using unique addresses made up of numbers, humans rely on the Domain Name System (DNS), the distributed database that allows us to identify machines by name. DNS does the work of translating domain names into numerical IP addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and many other services, so that users require little or no knowledge of the system. If you're a network or system administrator, however, configuring, implementing, and maintaining DNS zones can be a formidable challenge. And now, with Windows Server 2003, an understanding of the workings of DNS is even more critical.

DNS on Windows Server 20003 is a special Windows-oriented edition of the classic DNS and BIND, updated to document the many changes to DNS, large and small, found in Windows Server 2003. Veteran O'Reilly authors, Cricket Liu, Matt Larson, and Robbie Allen explain the whole system in terms of the new Windows Server 2003, from starting and stopping a DNS service to establishing an organization's namespace in the global hierarchy.

Besides covering general issues like installing, setting up, and maintaining the server, DNS on Windows Server 2003 tackles the many issues specific to the new Windows environment, including the use of the dnscmd program to manage the Microsoft DNS Server from the command line and development using the WMI DNS provider to manage the name server programmatically. The book also documents new features of the Microsoft DNS Server in Windows Server 2003, including conditional forwarding and zone storage in Active Directory (AD) application partitions.

DNS on Windows Server 2003 provides grounding in:

  • Security issues
  • System tuning
  • Caching
  • Zone change notification
  • Troubleshooting
  • Planning for growth
If you're a Windows administrator, DNS on Windows Server 2003 is the operations manual you need for working with DNS every day. If you're a Windows user who simply wants to take the mystery out of the Internet, this book is a readable introduction to the Internet's architecture and inner workings.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449378967
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/17/2003
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 418
  • Sales rank: 920,605
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Cricket Liu matriculated at the University of California's Berkeley campus, that great bastion of free speech, unencumbered Unix, and cheap pizza. He joined Hewlett-Packard after graduation and worked for HP for nine years. Cricket began managing the hp.com zone after the Loma Prieta earthquake forcibly transferred the zone's management from HP Labs to HP's Corporate Offices (by cracking a sprinkler main and flooding Labs' computer room). Cricket was hostmaster@hp.com for over three years, and then joined HP's Professional Services Organization to cofound HP's Internet Consulting Program. Cricket left HP in 1997 to form Acme Byte & Wire, a DNS consulting and training company, with his friend (and now co-author) Matt Larson. Network Solutions acquired Acme in June 2000, and later the same day merged with VeriSign. Cricket worked for a year as Director of DNS Product Management for VeriSign Global Registry Services. Cricket joined Men & Mice, an Icelandic company specializing in DNS software and services, in September, 2001. He is currently their Vice President, Research & Development. Cricket, his wife, Paige, and their son, Walt, live in Colorado with two Siberian Huskies, Annie and Dakota. On warm weekend afternoons, you'll probably find them on the flying trapeze or wakeboarding behind Betty Blue.

Matt Larson started Acme Byte & Wire, a company specializing in DNS consulting and training, with Cricket Liu in January 1997. Previously, he worked for Hewlett-Packard, first as Cricket's successor as hp.com hostmaster, then as a consultant in HP's Professional Services Organization. Matt graduated from Northwestern University in 1992 with two degrees: a bachelor of arts in computer science and a bachelor of music in church music/organ performance. He lives in Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife, Sonja Kahler, and their two pugs. In his spare time he enjoys playing the 10-rank pipe organ in his house and flying light airplanes. Cricket worked for five and a half years at Hewlett-Packard's Corporate Network Services, where he ran hp.com, one of the largest corporate domains in the world, and helped design the HP Internet's security architecture. Cricket left HP in 1997 to start his own company, Acme Byte & Wire, with his friend and co-author Matt Larson. Network Solutions acquired Acme Byte & Wire in June of 2000, and then subsequently, Network Solutions merged with VeriSign. Cricket became Director of DNS Product Management of the merged company, helping determine which new DNS-related products VeriSign would offer.

Robbie Allen is a Senior Systems Architect in the Advanced Services Technology Group at Cisco Systems. He was instrumental in the deployment and automation of Active Directory, DNS, and DHCP at Cisco. Robbie enjoys working on the Unix and Windows platforms, especially when Perl is installed. He is a firm believer that all system administrators should be proficient in at least one scripting language and most of his writings preach the benefits of automation. Robbie has a web site at www.rallenhome.com.

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Table of Contents

Preface
1 Background 1
2 How Does DNS Work? 11
3 Where Do I Start? 36
4 Setting Up the Microsoft DNS Server 50
5 DNS and Electronic Mail 96
6 Configuring Hosts 106
7 Maintaining the Microsoft DNS Server 127
8 Integrating with Active Directory 146
9 Growing Your Domain 164
10 Parenting 185
11 Advanced Features and Security 215
12 nslookup and dig 237
13 Managing DNS from the Command Line 261
14 Managing DNS Programmatically 282
15 Troubleshooting DNS 308
16 Miscellaneous 329
A DNS Message Format and Resource Records 355
B Converting from BIND to the Microsoft DNS Server 372
C Top-Level Domains 376
Index 385
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2007

    A great book for DNS on Win2k3

    I got this book coming from a BIND background and wanting to move to Windows DNS (I do have a valid reason). The first few chapters cover DNS background similar to the BIND book. After that it moves on into how to do things in the Windows world. It uses examples that are straight from the BIND book but done in Windows 2003. There are lots of screen shots and clear explanation. One of the really good things, for those coming from a *nix background, are the chapters on running from a command line and using PERL scripts to manage DNS. Overall it is a great book for anyone running DNS on Windows.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2004

    Do not buy this book!

    I purchased this book so that I could clear up a few things about DNS on Windows Server 2003. Actually, I want to master the concepts and techniques of DNS. After reading Mark Minasi's Mastering Windows 2003 Server, I got this book. This book confused me and I stopped reading the book. The lab in the book is impossible to duplicate and the book is poorly written (too technical). I am warning you. If you still want the book then that's on you. But, you have been warned.

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