Do Monkeys Tweet?

Do Monkeys Tweet?

by Melanie Walsh
     
 

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Monkeys never tweet; birds do! But . . . have you ever heard a horse bark? Or a butterfly growl? Or even a rabbit go oink? Find out for sure in this delightful book to read aloud, in which a series of questions with bright bold illustrations prompt readers and listeners to guess the answers. Preschoolers will clamor to participate and to show off their newly

Overview

Monkeys never tweet; birds do! But . . . have you ever heard a horse bark? Or a butterfly growl? Or even a rabbit go oink? Find out for sure in this delightful book to read aloud, in which a series of questions with bright bold illustrations prompt readers and listeners to guess the answers. Preschoolers will clamor to participate and to show off their newly acquired knowledge of animal sounds.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"From the author of Do Pigs Have Stripes? comes another picture book simple enough to make sense to young children and silly enough to make them laugh. . . . A crowd-pleaser." Booklist, ALA

"Children will love it." Kirkus Reviews

"The entire book is truly a hoot." Publishers Weekly

"A fun selection for a shout-it-out storytime." School Library Journal

Leonard S. Marcus
The guessing games that unfold in each of these small, square board books come with a twist of nonsense. Does a horse bark? Does a mouse have a green spiky tail? Walsh's colorful off-center graphics offer a winsome surprise with every page turn.
Parenting
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This companion to Do Pigs Have Stripes? will likewise have children delighted to know the answers to such questions as "Do little mice purr?" ("No, cats purr"); in addition to shouting a resounding "No!" involved listeners can join in with the animal sounds. (Children who want to know what kind of sound butterflies or camels actually make, however, may put adults on the spot.) The simply rendered, gently brushed illustrations play neutral grays and browns against bright fields of salmon, aqua, purple and lemon. Humorous touches reinforce the absurdity of growling butterflies and buzzing lambs: the question "Do horses bark?" shows a horse with a big cartoony bone in its mouth; the growling tiger looks about as fierce as a stuffed toy kitten; the pig winks slyly as it demonstrates that pigs, not rabbits, oink. The last question"Do owls go hoot in the middle of the night?"may be the only one to be answered yes, but the entire book is truly a hoot. Ages 4-7. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Judy Katsh
Silly animal questions are asked, and "setting the record straight" answers are given in this simple picture book for very young readers. The illustrations are friendly: big, cuddly, and bright. The pages are multi-colored and appropriately sized for young hands. It's a comfy book that's just perfect for tickling emerging funny bones.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
Silly animal questions are asked, and "setting the record straight" answers are given in this simple picture book for very young readers. The illustrations are friendly: big, cuddly, and bright. The pages are multi-colored and appropriately sized for young hands. It's a comfy book that's just perfect for tickling emerging funny bones.
School Library Journal
PreS-KThis companion to the author's Do Pigs Have Stripes? (Houghton, 1996) presents a series of questions and answers. Children will catch on quickly to the silliness of the inquiries ("Do horses bark?") and will easily guess the responses ("No, dogs do") when the page is turned. The comfortingly predictable format will encourage participation. Familiar animals are depicted in the childlike illustrations. Simple, large, and rendered in bold colors, they are a perfect complement to the playful text. A fun selection for sharing one-on-one or for a shout-it-out storytime.Maria B. Salvadore, District of Columbia Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
Walsh (Do Pigs Have Stripes?, 1996) again asks preschoolers questions to which they probably know the answers, but that doesn't mean they're a snap. "Do horses bark? No, dogs do," although the horse in the picture does hold a bone in its mouth. Tickling small funnybones, Walsh lures little ones into the swing of things, for each question requires a resounding "No!"—each question but the surprising final one, because owls do go hoot in the middle of the night. Bright, large images in a childlike scrawl of lines and flat planes of color, combined with the book's reiterated invitation to participate, make it a perfect candidate for story hours. The simplicity of presentation masks the book's complex wit and trickiness: Children will love it.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395850817
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/29/1997
Edition description:
None
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.56(w) x 8.59(h) x 0.45(d)
Age Range:
5 - 3 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Walsh asks the kinds of questions that leave preschoolers in stitches: "Are these the antlers of a monkey?" Part of the hilarity comes from knowing the answer and waiting for the turn of the page to reveal it, and part comes from the incongruous mental images of monkeys with antlers, mice with spiky green tails, and porcupines spotted like Holstein cows. Walsh wisely never shows the animals mixed up, and she accompanies the off-the-wall inquiries, which appear in large, black letters, with boldly colored, comical paintings. The effect is clean, graphically charged, and funny. Walsh ends on an upbeat note, asking a question ("Does a giraffe have a long thin neck?" ) that will elicit a resounding "Yes!" from story hour groups.

March 1, 1996 Booklist, ALA

In this follow-up to her terrific debut, Do Pigs Have Stripes?, Walsh is once again right on target for preschoolers. The series of questions about animal sounds (o camels cheep? / No, chicks cheep! will instantly invite young listeners to provide answers, as well as sounds of their own. Walsh's friendly animals on simple backgrounds of warm, bright color are perfect for groups but intimate enough for one-on-one sharing. Horn Book

Walsh (Do Pigs Have Stripes?, 1996) again asks preschoolers questions to which they probably know the answers, but that doesn't mean they're a snap. Do horses bark? No, dogs do,' although the horse in the picture does hold a bone in its mouth. Tickling small funnybones, Walsh lures little ones into the swing of things, for each question requires a resounding No!'—each question but the surprising final one, because owls do go hoot in the middle of the night. Bright, large images in a childlike scrawl of lines and flat planes of color, combined with the book's reiterated invitation to participate, make it a perfect candidate for story hours. The simplicity of presentation book's complex wit and trickiness: Children will love it.
Kirkus Reviews

"The entire book is truly a hoot." Publishers Weekly

"A fun selectrion for a shout-it-out storytime." School Library Journal

Meet the Author

After studying at the Harrow School of Art and the Royal College of Art, Melanie Walsh worked as a textile designer before writing and illustrating children’s books. In addition to receiving many fine reviews, she won the Parents Choice Gold Award for Do Pigs Have Stripes? Melanie lives in London and has two young twin sons.

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