Do Pigs Have Stripes?

Do Pigs Have Stripes?

by Melanie Walsh
     
 

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Pigs don't have stripes—zebras do! Each question—and part of an animal—are shown on one double-page spread. When readers turn the page, they see the whole animal and the answer to the question. Preschoolers can show off their newly acquired knowledge of animals in this intriguing guessing game.

Overview

Pigs don't have stripes—zebras do! Each question—and part of an animal—are shown on one double-page spread. When readers turn the page, they see the whole animal and the answer to the question. Preschoolers can show off their newly acquired knowledge of animals in this intriguing guessing game.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This beautifully executed debut picture book begs to be shared aloud and will have children clamoring to participate." Horn Book

"This beautifully executed debut picture book begs to be shared aloud and will have children clamoring to participate." Horn Book Guide

"Sure to elicit giggles." Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this playful animal name-game, first-time picture book author Walsh poses obvious but entertaining questions and answers sure to elicit giggles from the preschool set. Each sequence requires two spreads: the first displays just a bit of a mystery beast ("Does a bird have a big black wet nose?"), and the turn of a page provides a complete picture of the animal ("No, a dog does."). Walsh varies the queries slightly to avoid repetition ("Are these the feet of a pussycat?... No, they belong to an elephant."), and just as readers get used to answering "No," the volume's final question ("Does a giraffe have a long thin neck?") takes an affirmative response. Walsh favors solid colors, visible brush strokes and a minimum of detail; an alligator's saw-edged green tail brightens against a complementary deep-red backdrop. Such bold, basic images can be seen at a distance, and the hand-printed black lettering is large enough to display to a reading group. Walsh's words and pictures demonstrate considerable wit, despite the simplicity of their presentation. Ages 4-7. (Mar.)
Children's Literature
The text asks silly questions designed to elicit a resounding "No"--that is, until the final question is asked. For example, Does a fish have a long tongue? When you turn the page, you see an anteater lapping up the critters with his tongue. The text presumes that kids know about the characteristics of the animals in question. If they don't, then parents and other caregivers can provide the necessary background. The bold, simple pictures are great fun. 2000, Houghton,
Children's Literature - Dia L. Michels
Of course pigs do not have black and white stripes, but zebras do. And mice do not have spiky green tails, crocodiles do. Walsh presents illustrations of identifying animal features, like elephant feet and deer antlers, and asks the reader, "Does a [totally unrelated animal] have [this feature]?" It is a clever, humorous way of helping children to identify a small cast of animals by name. The book ends with a final animal identity question that's a bit tricky. Children will find this simple book to be good fun.
School Library Journal
PreS-A simplistic book that encourages children to shout out their favorite word. Silly questions about a variety of animals, both domestic and wild, are included. " `Does a bird have a big black wet nose?' `No, a dog does.' `Are these the antlers of a monkey?' `No, they belong to a deer.' " The bold, childlike illustrations will appeal to young viewers, but the pig looks like a pink dog with a pig's nose and tail, and the anteater is totally unrecognizable. Julie Lacome's Walking through the Jungle (Candlewick, 1993) is a better title for animal recognition.-Lisa Marie Gangemi, Sousa Elementary School, Port Washington, NY
Susan Dove Lempke
Walsh asks the kinds of questions that leave preschoolers in stitches: "Are these the antlers of a monkey?" Part of the hilarity comes from knowing the answer and waiting for the turn of the page to reveal it, and part comes from the incongruous mental images of monkeys with antlers, mice with spiky green tails, and porcupines spotted like Holstein cows. Walsh wisely never shows the animals mixed up, and she accompanies the off-the-wall inquiries, which appear in large, black letters, with boldly colored, comical paintings. The effect is clean, graphically charged, and funny. Walsh ends on an upbeat note, asking a question ("Does a giraffe have a long thin neck?" ) that will elicit a resounding "Yes!" from story hour groups.
Kirkus Reviews
Burning questions of the animal world are answered here: Does a bird have a big black wet nose? Does a fish have a long tongue? With a loud "No" to every question but one, Walsh's debut acts less as a primer in zoology than as a template of the question-and-answer format. It may be a toddler's first quiz book. Simple, Lucy Cousins-like illustrations reinforce the regularly paced queries, with rough forms against bright backgrounds. The work is easily mastered, and doesn't bear rereading, but certainly has its charms.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395739761
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/28/1996
Edition description:
1st American ed
Pages:
15
Product dimensions:
8.58(w) x 8.59(h) x 0.39(d)
Lexile:
230L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 3 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Walsh asks the kinds of questions that leave preschoolers in stitches: "Are these the antlers of a monkey?" Part of the hilarity comes from knowing the answer and waiting for the turn of the page to reveal it, and part comes from the incongruous mental images of monkeys with antlers, mice with spiky green tails, and porcupines spotted like Holstein cows. Walsh wisely never shows the animals mixed up, and she accompanies the off-the-wall inquiries, which appear in large, black letters, with boldly colored, comical paintings. The effect is clean, graphically charged, and funny. Walsh ends on an upbeat note, asking a question ("Does a giraffe have a long thin neck?" ) that will elicit a resounding "Yes!" from story hour groups.

March 1, 1996 Booklist, ALA

"Walsh (Do Pigs Have Stripes?, 1996) again asks preschoolers questions to which they probably know the answers, but that doesn't mean they're a snap. Do horses bark? No, dogs do,' although the horse in the picture does hold a bone in its mouth. Tickling small funnybones, Walsh lures little ones into the swing of things, for each question requires a resounding No!'—each question but the surprising final one, because owls do go hoot in the middle of the night. Bright, large images in a childlike scrawl of lines and flat planes of color, combined with the book's reiterated invitation to participate, make it a perfect candidate for story hours. The simplicity of presentation masks the book's complex wit and trickiness: Children will love it. (Picture book. 4-7) Burning questions of the animal world are answered here: Does a bird have a big black wet nose? Does a fish have a long tongue? With a loud No' to every question but one, Walsh's debut acts less as a primer in zoology than as a template of the question-and-answer format. It may be a toddler's first quiz book. Simple, Lucy Cousins-like illustrations reinforce the regularly paced queries, with rough forms against bright backgrounds. The work is easily mastered, and doesn't bear rereading, but certainly has its charms. (Picture book. 3-5)" Kirkus Reviews

"Sure to elicit giggles." Publishers Weekly

"Begs to be shared aloud." Horticulture Magazine

Meet the Author

After studying at the Harrow School of Art and the Royal College of Art, Melanie Walsh worked as a textile designer before writing and illustrating children’s books. In addition to receiving many fine reviews, she won the Parents Choice Gold Award for Do Pigs Have Stripes? Melanie lives in London and has two young twin sons.

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