Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze

Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze

4.0 1
by Steve Englehart, Various, Andru Ross
     
 
Classic pulp fiction hero Doc Savage stars in several comic adaptations of the famous 30's pulp novels.

The classic comics adaptations of Lester Dent's original Doc Savage stories from the 1930's ,"Man of Bronze", "Death in Silver", "The Monsters" "Brand of the Werewolf" are collected here for the first time.

Overview

Classic pulp fiction hero Doc Savage stars in several comic adaptations of the famous 30's pulp novels.

The classic comics adaptations of Lester Dent's original Doc Savage stories from the 1930's ,"Man of Bronze", "Death in Silver", "The Monsters" "Brand of the Werewolf" are collected here for the first time.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401227272
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
06/01/2010
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.30(d)

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Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
theduck More than 1 year ago
In the early 1970s, Marvel Comics acquired the rights to produce Doc Savage comic books, and these are what are printed in this volume. Marvel's plan at first was to adapt the original novels into the present day, but that plan lasted all of one issue - with issue two the series was set in the '30s, where Doc and his crew belong. Unfortunately, the stories they adapted (The Man of Bronze, Death in Silver, The Monsters and Brand of the Werewolf) were 80 page prose novels adapted into forty pages of comics, so the plots were whittled down to the bare bones, eliminating much of the character interaction and details that made the original novels such fun to read. Still, given the limitations, these stories are well done. Ross Andru was an ideal artist for Doc - his somewhat stiff, solid drawings suited the material well, and the stories are certainly fast paced. These adaptations provide a good introduction to Doc, but ultimately the best way to go is with Nostalgia Venture's series of reprints - the original stories, totally uncut, and with the illustrations from the original pulp publication. And ultimately, if you're interested in comic book versions of Doc, these are about as good as they get (avoid DC's first attempt at Doc, The Silver Pyramid - good art, horrible story)..