Doctor Squash the Doll Doctor [NOOK Book]

Overview

From the Golden Books archives comes a Margaret Wise Brown gem, with fresh new illustrations!

Mother, Mother, I am sick
Call for the Doctor quick quick quick!

When tiny toys of all kinds cry, Doctor Squash comes running! Always ready to mend and soothe, to pat and ...
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Doctor Squash the Doll Doctor

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Overview

From the Golden Books archives comes a Margaret Wise Brown gem, with fresh new illustrations!

Mother, Mother, I am sick
Call for the Doctor quick quick quick!

When tiny toys of all kinds cry, Doctor Squash comes running! Always ready to mend and soothe, to pat and prescribe, Doctor Squash helps each doll stay "fit as a fiddle and right as rain." And when the good doctor himself falls ill, you can be sure there will be a crackerjack team of dolls-turned-doctors ready to rush to his aid!

Beautifully reillustrated by David Hitch, this whimsical Golden Book from the 1950s will enchant a new generation.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—This newly illustrated reissue of a 1952 Golden Book recounts the illnesses of various dolls—squeaky soldier, teddy bear with a bloody nose, fireman with a broken leg, Indian with poison ivy, etc—and Doctor Squash, who comes running to dispense medicine and advice as needed. When the good doctor falls ill, the toys get the chance to return the favor and take care of him. Hitch's cartoon illustrations complement the text well with bright colors and great facial expressions. They are updated from the original (no Mammy doll) but still have an old-fashioned look. References to the snowman doll's illness and "wild Indian" have been removed. Perplexingly, the story does continue to refer to cough drops as "good as candy and just as pretty" and to mention writing prescriptions for measles, mumps, chicken pox, and whooping cough. Updated, but still a bit out-of-date.—Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375983214
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 10/12/2010
  • Series: A Golden Classic
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 417,840
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

Margaret Wise Brown, perhaps best known as the author of GOODNIGHT MOON (Harper), wrote countless children's books inspired by her belief that the very young could be fascinated by the simple pleasures of the world around them. She wrote several bestselling Little Golden Books including MISTER DOG, SAILOR DOG, and THE COLOR KITTENS.

David Hitch has illustrated children's books in the US and in England. His work has also appeared in the New Yorker.

From the Hardcover edition.

Biography

When Margaret Wise Brown began to write for young children, most picture books were written by illustrators, whose training and talents lay mainly in the visual arts. Brown, the author of Goodnight Moon, was the first picture-book author to achieve recognition as a writer, and the first, according to historian Barbara Bader, "to make the writing of picture books an art."

After graduating college in 1932, Brown's first ambition was to write literature for adults; but when she entered a program for student teachers in New York, she was thrilled by the experience of working with young children, and inspired by the program's progressive leader, the education reformer Lucy Sprague Mitchell. Mitchell held that stories for very young children should be grounded in "the here and now" rather than nonsense or fantasy. For children aged two to five, she thought, real experience was magical enough without embellishments.

Few children's authors had attempted to write specifically for so young an audience, but Brown quickly proved herself gifted at the task. She was appointed editor of a new publishing firm devoted to children's books, where she cultivated promising new writers and illustrators, helped develop innovations like the board book, and became, as her biographer Leonard S. Marcus notes, "one of the central figures of a period now considered the golden age of the American picture book."

Though Brown was intensely interested in modernist writers like Gertrude Stein (whom she persuaded to write a children's book, The World Is Round), it was a medieval ballad that provided the inspiration for The Runaway Bunny (1942), illustrated by Clement Hurd. The Runaway Bunny was Brown's first departure from the here-and-now style of writing, and became one of her most popular books.

Goodnight Moon, another collaboration with Hurd, appeared in 1947. The story of a little rabbit's bedtime ritual, its rhythmic litany of familiar objects placed it somewhere between the nursery rhyme and the here-and-now story. At first it was only moderately successful, but its popularity gradually climbed, and by 2000, it was among the top 40 best-selling children's books of all time.

The postwar baby boom helped propel sales of Brown's many picture books, including Two Little Trains (1949) and The Important Book (1949). After the author died in 1952, at the age of 42, many of her unpublished manuscripts were illustrated and made into books, but Brown remains best known for Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny.

More people recognize those titles than recognize the name of their author, but Margaret Wise Brown wouldn't have minded. "It didn't seem important that anyone wrote them," she once said of the books she read as a child. "And it still doesn't seem important. I wish I didn't have ever to sign my long name on the cover of a book and I wish I could write a story that would seem absolutely true to the child who hears it and to myself." For millions of children who have settled down to hear her stories, she did just that.

Good To Know

When Goodnight Moon first appeared, the New York Public Library declined to buy it (an internal reviewer dismissed it as too sentimental). The book sold fairly well until 1953, when sales began to climb, perhaps because of word-of-mouth recommendations by parents. More than 4 million copies have now been sold. The New York Public Library finally placed its first order for the book in 1973.

If you look closely at the bookshelves illustrated in Goodnight Moon, you'll see that one of the little rabbit's books is The Runaway Bunny. One of three framed pictures on the walls shows a scene from the same book.

Brown's death was a stunning and sad surprise. The author had had an emergency appendectomy in France while on a book tour, which was successful; but when she did a can-can kick days later to demonstrate her good health to her doctor, it caused a fatal embolism.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Golden MacDonald, Juniper Sage, Timothy Hay
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 23, 1910
    2. Place of Birth:
      Brooklyn, N.Y.
    1. Date of Death:
      November 13, 1952
    2. Place of Death:
      Nice, France

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2013

    So bad

    Boring baby stuff

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