Doctor, What Should I Eat?: Nutrition Prescriptions for Ailments in Which Diet Can Really Make a Difference

Doctor, What Should I Eat?: Nutrition Prescriptions for Ailments in Which Diet Can Really Make a Difference

by Isadore Rosenfeld
     
 

Isadore Rosenfeld, one of America's most trusted doctors, says there is a real link between the foods you eat and your health. Cutting through nutritional hype, myths, trends, and complex information, he offers specific food recommendations to treat more than fifty common health problems and conditions. Based on the latest research and supplemented with sensible

Overview

Isadore Rosenfeld, one of America's most trusted doctors, says there is a real link between the foods you eat and your health. Cutting through nutritional hype, myths, trends, and complex information, he offers specific food recommendations to treat more than fifty common health problems and conditions. Based on the latest research and supplemented with sensible menus and nutrition charts that also show you which foods to avoid, this definitive guide reveals:

  • How vitamins C and A can help prevent cataracts
  • The effect of garlic on your blood pressure, cholesterol, and immune system
  • Which vitamins and supplements can help prevent Alzheimer's, osteoporosis, cancer, and stroke
  • How to use antioxidants to combat heart disease and slow down aging
  • How coffee can help an acute asthma attack.

What You Eat Really Can Make A Difference!

In Doctor, What Should I Eat?, Dr. Rosenfeld offers nutrition prescriptions--many as surprising as they are effective--to help you prevent or recover from a variety of ailments, including:

  • Parkinson's disease: when "good" food and healthy multivitamins can harm you!
  • Infertility: the right foods could conceivably help you get pregnant
  • Heart disease: can a glass of wine really protect you?
  • Premenstrual syndrome: a doctor gives you his blessing to
    eat chocolate!
  • Diet and sex: can what you eat rev up your love life?
  • Jet lag: fly first class, eat economy
  • Hyperactivity: the sugar myth
  • Multiple sclerosis: a high-fat diet may actually be good for you!

Dr. Rosenfeld's sound, accessible advice on these and many other ailments will help you and your doctor work together more effectively for your good health.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Rosenfeld (The Best Treatment), a clinical professor of medicine at New York Hospital/Cornell Medical Center, calls on humor and a breezy style to help readers eliminate myth and fluff from the truth of what diet can and cannot do to alleviate symptoms or cure a variety of medical conditions. Rosenfeld emphasizes that diet can make a big difference for people battling various cancers, Parkinson's disease, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and chronic fatigue syndrome, even when ``cures'' may not be possible. He also describes the health-promoting and -preserving qualities of nutrients. Charts detail the fiber content of food, sources of vitamins and how to incorporate them into one's diet; the author also offers sample menus, including one designed to alleviate the discomforts of jet lag. Rosenfeld is quick to say that diet alone does not seem to influence some conditions, such as acne; he also informs us about dietary evidence that is rather new, sketchy or controversial. Unfortunately missing from this solid resource are chapter references and a list of resources readers could consult for additional information. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Rosenfeld, author of the best-selling The Best Treatment (LJ 12/91), offers nutritional advice for a variety of ailments, from acne to vaginal yeast infections. He provides sample menus, with portions and calories for each. He also gives the vitamin and/or mineral content for various foods. The medical advice given appears to be sound, but few sources (or medical research studies) are cited other than Rosenfeld's own experience. Vegetarians and many nutritionists will be disappointed to read, more than once, of the "low biological value" and "low quality" of plant foods, terms that became obsolete in the 1980s. Although some writers still use these terms, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) has agreed that plant foods have good-quality protein, enough for an adequate diet without animal products; moreover, it is beneficial to use these alternative proteins for optimum health. Though not as comprehensive on diseases as Rosenfeld's book, Joseph Beasley's Food for Recovery (LJ 2/1/94) is a preferred choice for more current nutrition information. Still, Rosenfeld's book is a good reference book for larger nutrition collections. (Index not seen.) [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 9/15/94.]-Loraine F. Sweetland, Rebok Memorial Lib., Silver Spring, Md.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517179802
Publisher:
Random House Value Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/27/1994
Pages:
425

Meet the Author

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >