Doctor Who: Winner Takes All

Doctor Who: Winner Takes All

4.5 6
by Jacqueline Rayner
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Rose and the Doctor return to present-day Earth to visit Rose's mum, and become intrigued by the latest craze -- the video game, Death to Mantodeans. Is it as harmless as it seems? And why are so many local people going on holiday and never returning?

Meanwhile, on another world, an alien war is raging. The Quevvils need to find a new means of attacking the

Overview

Rose and the Doctor return to present-day Earth to visit Rose's mum, and become intrigued by the latest craze -- the video game, Death to Mantodeans. Is it as harmless as it seems? And why are so many local people going on holiday and never returning?

Meanwhile, on another world, an alien war is raging. The Quevvils need to find a new means of attacking the ruthless Mantodeans. Searching the galaxy for cunning, warlike but gullible allies, they find the ideal soldiers - on Earth.

Will Rose be able to save her family and friends from the alien threat? And can the Doctor play the game to the end - and win?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781849907156
Publisher:
Random House UK
Publication date:
09/24/2013
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
254,099
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.90(h) x 0.60(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Jacqueline Rayner made a wish that she could combine her degree in Ancient History with her profession as a writer, and The Stone Rose was the result. She has written several other Doctor Who novels including Winner Takes All. Other major interests include vegetarianism, girls' comics, cats and Golden Age crime fiction.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Doctor Who: Winner Takes All 4.5 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 6 reviews.
brjunkie More than 1 year ago
Set Between Episodes 'World War Three' & 'The Empty Child' This was a fun read. It reminded me some of the 1980's movie 'The Last Starfighter'. Everyone in the UK is caught up in playing the lottery on scratchcards in order to win prizes like vacations and game consoles. One of the games, Death to the Mantodeans, is the new obsession. The Doctor, Rose, Mickey, and Jackie all find themselves caught between the warring aliens the Quevvils, a porcupine type race, and the Mantodeans, a praying mantis type race. When the Doctor learns what is really happening, and with the games consoles being sold online, how can he save the planet Earth? The question/discovery I loved the most in this book is when Rose learns that the Doctor genuinely needs her. She validates him. Like the saying, if a tree fell in a forest when no one was there to hear it, did it make a sound? If a Time Lord saved a world when there was no one there to know it, was he still a hero? I would recommend this book to those who've seen and loved the first season of the new Doctor Who TV series, played by Christopher Eccleston.
HellenB More than 1 year ago
The Doctor and Rose land on Earth to visit Rose’s mother. What they find is a new video game, “Death to Mantodeans”, that is not as harmless and innocent as it looks like. This video game is a prize to be given to people who find a message in a card. Winning in the video game is almost impossible. In fact, very few people have finished the training levels and only the Doctor can get a very high score. There are other prizes people can win that are a bit more suspicious: mysterious trips. The people who go on those trips cannot be reached by any means and they are not returning from the trip; they seem to have disappeared. The truth is scarier: they have become part of the video games. Like the other Doctor Who book I’ve reviewed, it can be enjoyed by fans of the tv series and by people who have never watched an episode. But to understand everything, like why the Doctor is a bit scared of Rose’s mother, it is necessary to have watched a few episodes. That knowledge is also useful to know the characters as their description is not very detailed. The Quevvils, the bad aliens of this novel, seem to be ridiculous and harmless, but the truth is quite different. They shouldn’t be underestimated just because they look a bit silly; when they attack they are rather powerful. This book shows that winning is relative. Obviously the Doctor saves the day, like he always does, but he can’t save everybody. He stops the threat and saves the Earth, but not everybody lives. Another topics present in this novel are slavery and trust. The people in the video game can’t perform any movements themselves; they are controlled by players with gaming pads. They don’t know what is happening to them (neither the people inside the video game, nor the players), but Rose does, and she starts to wonder how much she really trusts the Doctor when she’s inside the game and the Doctor is controlling her. We see how difficult it is to trust another person when you are not in control of any part of a situation.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A really great read l'd recommend to any Whovian. Don't want to spoil anything but this book enhances the characters shown in the show. It shows (very slightly but still there) how Rose and the Doctor are slowly but surely developing feelings for each other, neither really realizing it, but from how Jackie and Mickey act, you know that not everyone is oblivious to their growing relationship. This book tells of friendship and many other things and I strongly recommend it to anyone who has the lightest curiosityin it.
Anonymous 10 days ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I never knew my previous incarnation went through so much!(;