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Doctor Who Omnibus, Volume 1
     

Doctor Who Omnibus, Volume 1

3.0 1
by Nick Roche (Artist), Josep Maria Beroy (Artist), Stefano Martino (Artist), Mirco Pierfederici (Artist), Paul Grist (Artist)
 
This omnibus collects three volumes of Doctor Who tales, all involving the Tenth Doctor as portrayed by David Tennant. The collection begins with Agent Provocateur: as The Doctor and Martha Jones search for the best chocolate milkshakes in the cosmos, someone else is on the hunt for him. Next, fans will enjoy Through Time and Space, a collection of six one-shot

Overview

This omnibus collects three volumes of Doctor Who tales, all involving the Tenth Doctor as portrayed by David Tennant. The collection begins with Agent Provocateur: as The Doctor and Martha Jones search for the best chocolate milkshakes in the cosmos, someone else is on the hunt for him. Next, fans will enjoy Through Time and Space, a collection of six one-shot stories from creators such as Leah Moore, Ben Templesmith, Tony Lee, and John Ostrander. The omnibus concludes with The Forgotten, a story in which The Doctor is stranded in a strange museum dedicated to him, featuring appearances by all 10 Doctors!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781613773482
Publisher:
Idea & Design Works, LLC
Publication date:
02/19/2013
Pages:
420
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.82(h) x 0.88(d)

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Doctor Who Omnibus, Volume 1 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is billed on the back cover as containing “three tales” of the Tenth Doctor, but actually it contains two longer story arcs and a number of stand-alone stories that were originally published as one-shots.  As is often the case with such compilations, this suffers quite a bit from having so many different writers and artists involved in the various stories that comprise this book.  The Doctor looks quite different in the various stories, which is a distraction, and the art styles employed also differ so greatly in treatment (and competence) that it is difficult to fully enjoy the book as a unified whole. The first story arc was a convoluted mess, but that’s not something I specifically hold against a Doctor Who story.  It’s a fairly quick read after all and in the end I didn’t begrudge the time I invested in reading it—I just couldn’t shake the feeling that it could have been executed in a much more enjoyable fashion.  The second story arc, which closes the book, partially redeemed it containing a story of each of the previous nine Doctors, which was a fun concept, fairly well executed.  But again, the main plot that framed these stories together was a bit of a mess and I believe I would have enjoyed this much more if it had done away with the main story altogether and just included the individual stories of the previous Doctors with the extra pages used to flesh out each story a little (as most seemed very condensed). If you are a huge Doctor Who fan—especially of the Tenth Doctor—then I certainly would not warn you away from this.  It was an enjoyable read, but simply mildly enjoyable when it had the potential to be so much more.  If you are not an especially large Doctor Who fan or prefer your Doctor Who reading in the form of novels over comics then this very well may not be your cup of tea.  It really seems more supplemental reading once you’ve settled into Doctor Who than something that should be at the top of anyone’s reading list.