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Doctors in the Great War
     

Doctors in the Great War

3.0 1
by Ian R Whitehead
 

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This book examines the role of the doctor in war, with reference to the Western front 1914-1918. It examines the system that was developed for recruiting medical officers, highlighting the tensions between civil and military needs, and the BMA's determination to protect the interests of the profession. Separate chapters deal with the position of medical students and

Overview

This book examines the role of the doctor in war, with reference to the Western front 1914-1918. It examines the system that was developed for recruiting medical officers, highlighting the tensions between civil and military needs, and the BMA's determination to protect the interests of the profession. Separate chapters deal with the position of medical students and the contribution of women doctors. The book looks at the training of doctors for war, and the differences that existed between military and civilian medicine. The Army's utilization of doctors is assessed in the context of contemporary accusations that its organization was wasteful and ignorant of the requirements of medical science. These issues are addressed through a discussion of evacuation procedures, the development of wound therapy and the provision for preventing and treating the diseases of war.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781783461745
Publisher:
Pen & Sword Books Limited
Publication date:
03/05/2014
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,374,899
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.10(d)

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Doctors in the Great War 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This publication deals more with the organization and administration of the U.K. DOCTORS DURING WWI vice the insurmountable obstacles they endured in the trenches. Of interest was the lack leadership displayed by the upper ranks towards the until much latter on in the war. Also, it was well known by doctors at the time, that you were more likely to find yourself assigned to a frontline hospital if your were Scottish or Irish