×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Doctors Talking with Patients/Patients Talking with Doctors: Improving Communication in Medical Visits (Second Edition)
     

Doctors Talking with Patients/Patients Talking with Doctors: Improving Communication in Medical Visits (Second Edition)

by Debra L. Roter
 

The verbal and nonverbal exchanges that take place between doctor and patient affect both participants, and can result in a range of positive or negative psychological reactions-including comfort, alarm, irritation, or resolve. This updated edition of a widely popular book sets out specific principles and recommendations for improving doctor-patient communications.

Overview

The verbal and nonverbal exchanges that take place between doctor and patient affect both participants, and can result in a range of positive or negative psychological reactions-including comfort, alarm, irritation, or resolve. This updated edition of a widely popular book sets out specific principles and recommendations for improving doctor-patient communications. It describes the process of communication, analyzes social and psychological factors that color doctor-patient exchanges, and details changes that can benefit both parties.

Medical visits are often less effective and satisfying than they would be if doctors and patients better understood the communication most needed for attainment of mutual health goals. The verbal and nonverbal exchanges that take place between doctor and patient affect both participants, and can result in a range of positive or negative psychological reactions-including comfort, alarm, irritation, or resolve. Talk, on both verbal and non-verbal levels, is shown by extensive research to have far-reaching impact.

This updated edition of a widely popular book helps us understand this vital issue, and facilitate communications that will mean more effective medical care and happier, healthier consumers. Roter and Hall set out specific principles and recommendations for improving doctor-patient relationships. They describe the process of communication, analyze social and psychological factors that color doctor-patient exchanges, and detail changes that can benefit both parties. Here are needed encouragement and principles of action vital to doctors and patients alike. far-reaching impact.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
For this thoroughly updated and expanded second edition of a 1992 book, Roter (health & policy management, Johns Hopkins Univ.) and Hall (psychology, Northeastern Univ.) draw on their studies in the field of medical communication, as well as on many other research papers (there is a 28-page bibliography of citations). Their decision to revamp the text comes in the wake of new competency requirements for medical school graduates, including interpersonal communication. The focus is on "talk," e.g., nonverbal cues between doctors and patients, including how a physician's characteristics influence his or her communication. One section investigates what the research literature has concluded about medical visits (e.g., that much information is withheld during visits). The authors finish by detailing "prospects for improved talk" and throughout give conclusions and statements to help modify and improve practice. Although general readers will find the information interesting, this is an excellent textbook that gathers all the work on the subject in one place. Recommended for academic, medical, and special collections with a specific interest in patient empowerment and communication in medical settings.-Elizabeth J. Eastwood, Mesa P.L., Los Alamos, NM Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313071881
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
08/30/2006
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
291 KB

Meet the Author

DEBRA L. ROTER holds a joint appointment as Professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and at the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Nursing.

JUDITH A. HALL is Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews