Documentary Culture and the Laity in the Early Middle Ages

Documentary Culture and the Laity in the Early Middle Ages

by Warren Brown
     
 

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This revealing study explores how people at all social levels, whether laity or clergy, needed, used and kept documents.See more details below

Overview

This revealing study explores how people at all social levels, whether laity or clergy, needed, used and kept documents.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Most studies of early medieval literacy have emphasised the role of the Church in the production of written documents. This collection puts the spotlight on the involvement of the laity, and vividly reveals the extent to which laymen played an active role in documentary culture throughout the post-Roman World, from the Eastern Mediterranean to Anglo-Saxon England. In so doing it greatly enriches our understanding of government, administration and estate organisation in the centuries after Rome’s Fall." -Ian Wood, University of Leeds

"This is an extraordinarily important book for anyone seeking to understand the profound penetration of text culture into pre-modern societies. The authors raise fundamental questions about the meaning of archives, the reasons that documents were preserved, copied, or destroyed, and the relationship between changes in lay documentary practice and social and economic change, as well as between document preservation and political and ecclesiastical power. The cumulative result is a radical revision of facile, if long-popular, assumptions about orality, literacy, and textuality in Europe prior to the twelfth century." -Patrick J. Geary. Institute for Advanced Study

"If Mabillon was the Newton of diplomatics, this book is the Einstein, overturning old paradigms and forcing us to think anew about early medieval documents. Did we imagine that the Early Middle Ages was an “oral culture”? That only public institutions had “archives”? That monks and clerics alone were “literate”? That “the laity” started to appreciate writing only in the twelfth century? This book makes us realize how limiting those old terms have been. We can now say with considerable confidence that people at every level of early medieval society knew about, valued, used, and depended on the written word." -Barbara H. Rosenwein, Loyola University Chicago

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781107025295
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
11/30/2012
Pages:
408
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 1.02(d)

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