Dodsworth in Rome

Dodsworth in Rome

5.0 1
by Tim Egan
     
 

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With trips to New York, Paris, and London under their belts, it’s now time for Dodsworth and the duck to visit Rome! From throwing coins into the Trevi Fountain to winning a pizza-dough-throwing contest to looking up at the Sistine Chapel ceiling, Dodsworth and his misbehaving duck take a tour of their oldest city yet. With Tim Egan’s snappy words and

Overview

With trips to New York, Paris, and London under their belts, it’s now time for Dodsworth and the duck to visit Rome! From throwing coins into the Trevi Fountain to winning a pizza-dough-throwing contest to looking up at the Sistine Chapel ceiling, Dodsworth and his misbehaving duck take a tour of their oldest city yet. With Tim Egan’s snappy words and playful illustrations, it will surely be a spaghetti-twirling sight to see. Ciao!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Egans understated, hilarious travelogue continues as Dodsworth and his duck pal explore Rome, Italy."—Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature - Leona Illig
Dodsworth, a little fellow with an urge to travel, and his sidekick, known only as "the duck," find themselves in Rome in this charming story. They like the city immediately, and take a whirlwind tour of the sites on a scooter. They also like the food: wonderful gelato and delicious pizza. Trouble arises, however, when Dodsworth's suitcase goes missing. After a frantic chase, a taxi driver tracks them down and returns the lost luggage, and the problem is solved. The antics of the duck provide most of the humor in this story. First, he decides to improve the Sistine Chapel by painting a duck on the ceiling; next, he wins a pizza-tossing contest; and finally, he fishes coins out of the Trevi Fountain to help his friend when their money is lost. Dodsworth also has his moments, however, as he spars with his traveling companion in some very funny exchanges, and attempts to save the duck from embarrassing situations. The humor, as well as the warmth of the relationship between Dodsworth and the duck, makes this tale an attractive one for young readers. The illustrations, which take up about two-thirds of each page, are whimsical, and done in colors that are muted and easy on the eyes. The layout of the book is especially beneficial for new readers, since the illustrations reinforce the text. This book is the fourth one in the "Dodsworth" series and compares favorably with the others. Children who have been to Rome, or who know about the city's culture, will especially like this book. Those who are not familiar with Italy, however, are still likely to enjoy the book as long as there is an adult available who can explain some of the sights and words to them. Reviewer: Leona Illig
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Dodsworth and his irrepressible travel companion, the duck, continue their world tour. In Rome, they see all the sights for which the Eternal City is famous, including the Coliseum, the Trevi Fountain, and the Pantheon. Dodsworth has his hands full as his friend tries to paint a duck on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, enters a pizza-throwing contest, and takes coins out of that fountain, but he manages to make everything right in the end. This early reader is divided into four short chapters, each containing a mini adventure written in short sentences of fairly simple words. Egan includes a few terms to stretch readers' vocabulary, but their meanings are mostly discernible from the context and from the pictures. The format is the same as in the other Dodsworth books, with one picture and about six lines of large-font text per page. The illustrations are simple cartoons in ink and watercolor washes, and the famous landmarks are recognizable but not detailed. Although the story is mildly amusing, it is fans of the earlier adventures or children who have a special interest in Rome who are most likely to enjoy it. For others it is of secondary interest.—Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT
Kirkus Reviews

Egan's understated, hilarious travelogue continues as Dodsworth and his duck pal explore Rome, Italy. The duck—still wearing an acorn beret from Paris (Dodsworth in Paris, 2008)—is the motor for most of the laughs. Standing beside colossal columns inSt. Peter's Square, he comments dryly, "I feel smaller than usual." Inside the Sistine Chapel, he notes placidly, "That's weird.... There isn't one duck in the entire painting." Moments later, he's on the ceiling with white paint, remedying that omission. Ink-and-watercolor illustrations employ tiny smiles and minimalist expressions to underscore the humor. In a pizza-throwing contest ("You're good at throwing food," comments Dodsworth, and indeed, the duck throws things in every city), the duck sneaks Dodsworth's suitcase behind a table to stand on, never telling Dodsworth. A chaotic search for the suitcase yields nothing, and without the cash inside it, Dodsworth can't afford a hotel. They doze overnight on the Spanish Steps. Next day, they dine heartily on found money—until honest Dodsworth discovers that the duck "found" the coins in the Trevi Fountain. Is the duck a descendent of Amelia Bedelia, innocently believing that a flea market contains fleas and that "Rome" means to roam around? Or is he slyly "mak[ing] the trip a little more exciting?" Deadpan delivery means there's no way to tell, and that's the brilliance of the duck. May the journey continue. (Early reader. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547390062
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/18/2011
Series:
Dodsworth Series, #4
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
360L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Tim Egan is the author and illustrator of several offbeat and humorous tales for children. Born in New Jersey, Tim moved to California to attend the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He still lives in southern California with his wife, Ann, and their two sons. To learn more about Tim Egan, visit his Web site at www.timegan.com.

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Dodsworth in Rome 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
mkaplan More than 1 year ago
My daughter loves the Dodsworth books, they are very cute and generate interest in the cities.