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Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development?
     

Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development?

by Theodore Moran, Edward M Graham, Magnus Blomström
 

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What is the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on development? The answer is important for the lives of millions—if not billions—of workers, families, and communities in the developing world. The answer is crucial for policymakers in developing and developed countries, and in multilateral agencies. This volume gathers together the cutting edge of new

Overview

What is the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on development? The answer is important for the lives of millions—if not billions—of workers, families, and communities in the developing world. The answer is crucial for policymakers in developing and developed countries, and in multilateral agencies. This volume gathers together the cutting edge of new research on FDI and host country economic performance and presents the most sophisticated critiques of current and past inquiries. It probes the limits of what can be determined from available evidence and from innovative investigative techniques. In addition, the book presents new results, concludes with an analysis of the implications for contemporary policy debates, and proposes new avenues for future research.

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A good reference for students seeking greater insights into this complex topic.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780881324631
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
04/15/2005
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
440
File size:
4 MB

Meet the Author

Theodore H. Moran, nonresident senior fellow, has been associated with the Peterson Institute since 1998. He holds the Marcus Wallenberg Chair at the School of Foreign Service in Georgetown University. He is the founder of the Landegger Program in International Business Diplomacy at the university and serves as director there. He also serves as a member of Huawei's International Advisory Council. From 2007 to 2013 he served as Associate to the US National Intelligence Council on international business issues.

Edward M. Graham (1944–2007) was a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute from 1990 to 2007. He also taught concurrently as adjunct professor at Columbia University in New York. Previously he was an economist at the US Treasury and taught full-time in the business schools of several US universities (MIT, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Duke University, among others). While serving at the Treasury, he was seconded for two years to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris. He also served as visiting or adjunct faculty at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Stanford University (Washington Program); The Johns Hopkins University; Seoul National University; Harvard University (John F. Kennedy School of Government); INSEAD (European Institute of Administration, Fontainebleau, France); and the University of Paris I (Pantheon/La Sorbonne). His research interests have included foreign direct investment, international competition policy, and the industrial organization of major Asian economies.

Magnus Blomström has been a professor of economics at the Stockholm School of Economics since 1990 and president of the European Institute of Japanese Studies, Stockholm School of Economics since 1997. He was an assistant professor in the department of economics, University of Gothenburg (1985-87) and a research fellow at the Institute for International Economic Studies, University of Stockholm (1982-84). He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and research fellow at the Centre of Economic Policy Research.

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