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Dog Biscuit
     

Dog Biscuit

by Helen Cooper
 

Hungry Bridget ate a biscuit . . . a dog biscuit! It tasted good – salty and sweet at the same time – but dog biscuits are meant for dogs, not people. Bridget starts to worry. Are her ears getting bigger? Is she growing a tail? Could she be turning into a dog? In the middle of the night, Bridget is swept off on a joyous romp with a wild dog pack. She

Overview

Hungry Bridget ate a biscuit . . . a dog biscuit! It tasted good – salty and sweet at the same time – but dog biscuits are meant for dogs, not people. Bridget starts to worry. Are her ears getting bigger? Is she growing a tail? Could she be turning into a dog? In the middle of the night, Bridget is swept off on a joyous romp with a wild dog pack. She has so much fun – until she thinks about leaving her family behind, which makes her so sad that she wakes up immediately, safe and sound in her mother's arms, and human once again.

Bursting with wild doggy energy, Helen Cooper's vibrant illustrations make this one of the most original picture books she has created yet. A recipe for Human-Being Treats is included!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“This is a beautiful and imaginative book for anyone who loves a good story.” —Starred, School Library Journal

“A story that understands how a young one's imagination works.” —Booklist

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
One day when young Bridget is hungry she steals a biscuit. It tastes good, but it is a dog biscuit. Bridget begins to worry when Mrs. Blair tells her that she will turn into a dog. She seems to hear her dog say that she used to be a child before she ate a dog biscuit. At the Butcher's, Bridget tries "woofs," and he calls her a "pup." She begins to wish that she had not eaten that biscuit. At dinner, her dad calls her behavior wild; she gets wilder at bath, bed, and story time. Meanwhile, her mom never seems to notice anything different, but Bridget is regretting that biscuit. That night, however, Bridget wakes up to the call of the dogs to have a night of magical fun and is glad that she ate the biscuit, but then she misses her family and is happy to be back in bed, hugged by her mom, and reassured that Mrs. Blair was just teasing. Cooper's vignette drawings are delightful, sensitive, and useful in bridging the gap between the larger detailed colored illustrations. Her imagination depicts what may well be a magic place for dogs with a great meat pie and raining sausages. A sky explodes across a double page with cubistic fragments. Bridget is an appealing character, as both girl and dog, with a lovable mom in a wildly wonderful tale. A recipe for "Human Being Treats" for the hungry is included. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—One day, while Bridget is at Mrs. Blair's house being looked after, she eats a biscuit she finds in the shed—a dog biscuit. Mrs. Blair jokes that she will "go bowwow and turn into a dog," and Bridget begins to believe it. She imagines that she is growing ears and a tail, woofs at the butcher on the way home, gobbles dinner, and acts like a bad doggy during bedtime stories, almost convincing herself that she has changed. Then she dreams of being a canine, partying under the moon with other dogs, and things become too real. She wakes up in the comforting arms of her mother, who confirms that she is still a little girl, and suggests that they "curl up like puppies, just us two," until morning. Next day, they go to see Mrs. Blair, who is sorry for the tease, and they all have tea and "human-being treats" (gingerbread men). The recipe is appended. A handsome and thoughtfully done layout uses different fonts and sizes for the text, and Cooper's illustrations alternate quiet, ordinary scenes with wild scenes of Bridget's imagination-in some, the little girl has an appealing dog's head with distinctive red ribbon bow; in her dream she is a white shaggy pup; and everywhere there are other dogs romping happily against unusually colored pages. This is a beautiful and imaginative book for anyone who loves a good story.—Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374318123
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
03/17/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.94(w) x 10.74(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD590L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Helen Cooper was born in London in 1963. When she was two, she moved to a country town in Cumbria, in the north of England, where people collected their milk in cans from the farm, and fairies seemed to lurk in the wildflowers outside. It rained a lot and there weren't enough kids to play with, but there were compensations: beautiful countryside, horses, and lots of time to write stories, draw pictures, play the piano, and read. When she grew up, Helen trained as a music teacher because that seemed sensible. Then she played in a band, and got a day job painting posh china animals to make ends meet. In the evenings, she taught herself to illustrate.

Her first book was published in 1987, and since then she has written and illustrated many books for children, including The Bear Under the Stairs, A Pipkin of Pepper, Delicious! and Pumpkin Soup, winner of the Kate Greenaway Medal and short-listed for the Kurt Maschler Award. Helen lives with her husband, Ted Dewan, who also writes and illustrates books. They live in Oxford, England, with their daughter, Pandora.

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