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Dog Blood [NOOK Book]

Overview


On the heels of Patient Zero and Pride and Prejudice with Zombies— the electrifying sequel to Hater where humanity fights itself to the death against a backdrop of ultimate apocalyptic destructionThe Earth has been torn into two parts by an irreversible division. Whether due to nature, or the unknown depths of the mind itself, everyone is now either Human or Hater. Victim or killer. Governments have fallen, command structures have collapsed, and relationships have crumbled. Major cities have become refugee camps...
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Dog Blood

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Overview


On the heels of Patient Zero and Pride and Prejudice with Zombies— the electrifying sequel to Hater where humanity fights itself to the death against a backdrop of ultimate apocalyptic destructionThe Earth has been torn into two parts by an irreversible division. Whether due to nature, or the unknown depths of the mind itself, everyone is now either Human or Hater. Victim or killer. Governments have fallen, command structures have collapsed, and relationships have crumbled. Major cities have become refugee camps where human survivors cower together in fear. Amidst this indiscriminate carnage, Danny McCoyne is on a mission to find his daughter Ellis, convinced that her shared Hater condition means her allegiance is to people like him. Free of inhibitions, unrestricted by memories of peace, and driven by instinct, children are pure Haters, and may well define the future of the Hater race. But, as McCoyne makes his way into the heart of human territory, an incident on the battlefield sets in place an unexpected chain of events, forcing him to question everything he believes he knows about the new order that has arisen, and the dynamic of the Hate itself.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Set in a madly grasping modern Budapest, literary critic Ervin’s debut mines very different ways of achieving personal and artistic freedom in three neatly polished, interlocking tales. In “14 Bagatelles,” world-renowned Hungarian composer Harkályi Lajos, a WWII concentration camp survivor who emigrated to America at 15, returns to Budapest for the premiere of his opera, The Golden Lotus, and finds the city shockingly hostile, criminal, and deeply anti-Semitic. “Brooking the Devil” follows the plight of a young black American GI, “Brutus” Gibson, rescued from skinheads by Harkályi, who is framed by his superior officer. Set up on a dangerous gun-running mission, Gibson recognizes his two choices: submit or refuse and risk court-martial. Finally, in “The Empty Chairs,” a second violinist in the Budapest orchestra, a young American expatriate performing Harkályi’s opera on the night of the premiere, deviates wildly from the score in a surprising and transformative reaction to the work--to the conductor’s horror and the composer’s great delight. With dexterous sensibility and fluid prose, Ervin’s protagonists find liberation from the onerous strictures of Budapest’s Nazi and Communist past. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
The war between the Haters and the Unchanged rages on in the follow-up to Moody's taut horror/suspense debut Hater (2009). When readers last saw Danny McCoyne, he and a bunch of his fellow Haters had just escaped certain death in a facility set up by the Unchanged, the people who were not affected by whatever it is that causes the Haters to feel an urgent need to kill those who are not like them. Now, several months later, war has broken out, with the Haters running free in the countryside while the Unchanged have withdrawn to cramped refugee camps in major urban areas. The Unchanged have greater numbers, a semi-functional society and a military on their side, while the Haters have single-minded focus, brutality and an unquenchable lust to kill going for them. Which isn't to say that some Haters-Danny included-can't still use their brains. Danny is currently on a quest to find his daughter, Ellis, who, unlike his wife and two sons, is also a Hater. Then, he is captured and tranquilized by a small group of Unchanged. He wakes up chained, under the "care" of Joseph Mallon, an Unchanged who attempts to train Danny to keep his need to kill in check. Mallon's techniques seem to pay off. Eventually, with some effort, Danny can just manage to be unrestrained in the same room as Mallon without killing him, which is a significant accomplishment for a Hater. Mallon decides that Danny is ready to meet Sahota, the man in charge. But can a Hater really stop hating? If Moody's Hater books follow the familiar zombie story of civilization rent to tatters by mindless, bloodthirsty former humans, they turn it on its ear by speaking with the voice of one of the zombies rather than one of their victims. Readers have seen a pre-Hater Danny head off to his dead-end job, get frustrated with his kids and engage in other everyday activities. That, along with Moody's spare prose, makes the book's scenes of brutal violence all the more affecting. Lean, relentless and terrifying.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429924597
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 6/8/2010
  • Series: Hater Series , #2
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 104,106
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author


David Moody is the author of Hater, Autumn and Autumn: The City. He grew up in Birmingham, England, on a diet of horror movies and post-apocalyptic fiction. He started his career working at a bank, but then decided to write the kind of fiction he loved. His first novel, Straight to You, had what Moody calls “microscopic sales,” and so when he wrote Autumn, he decided to publish it online. The book became a sensation and has been downloaded by half a million readers. He started his own publishing company, Infected Books. He lives in Britain with his wife and a houseful of daughters, which may explain his preoccupation with Armageddon.
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Read an Excerpt


1
HAVE TO GET AWAY from here. It’s too dangerous to stay. If there’s one thing I’ve learned about our piss-weak, cowardly enemy, it’s that they always deal their deadliest blows from a distance.
The leaden feet of the woman’s corpse are blocking the door and stopping me from getting out. I drag her out of the way, then shift the kid’s body, kicking it back across the cluttered floor. The kid’s bloodstained projector-screen shroud unrolls, revealing his lifeless face. Jesus, he was one of us. I uncover him fully. His wrists and ankles are bound. Can’t see how he died, but he hasn’t been dead long, a few days at the most. Probably starved. Another pitiful example of an Unchanged parent refusing to accept their kid’s destiny and let go. Did she think she’d be able to tame him or find a “cure” or something? Dumb bitch.
Back out into the corridor. Most people have gone now, but I can still hear a few of them moving about, hunting down the last kills before they move on. I automatically head toward the back of the building, hoping I’ll find more cover going out that way. A small kid darts past me, moving so fast that I can’t even tell if it’s a boy or a girl, then doubles back when it can’t get out. I keep moving forward until I reach a T-intersection. There’s a fire door to my left, but it’s been blocked and I can’t get through. I follow three men and a woman the other way into a dank toilet that smells so bad it makes my eyes water. The sudden darkness is disorienting, and the man in front of me takes the full force of a clumsy but unexpected attack from an Unchanged straggler who’s hiding in the shadows under a sink. There’s hardly room to swing a punch in here, but between the five of us we get rid of him quickly. I smash his face into a cracked mirror with a satisfying thump. He leaves a bloody stain on the glass, just another mark among many.
In a wide, rectangular handicapped cubicle there’s a narrow window high on the wall above the dried-up, mustard-brown-stained toilet bowl. One of the men, a small, suntanned, wiry-framed guy, climbs up onto the toilet, then uses the pipework to haul himself up. He opens the window and squeezes out through the gap. We take turns to follow him, impatiently standing in line like we’re waiting for a piss. The fighter in front of me has a wide belly and backside, and I can’t see him getting through. I’ll be damned if I’m going to get stuck in here behind him. I push him to one side and climb past, knowing I’ll be long gone before he gets outside, if he gets out at all. I throw my backpack down, then force myself through the narrow window frame and drop down into a flower bed overrun with brambles and weeds. A pile of waste and emaciated corpses cushions my fall. I quickly get up, swing my pack back onto my shoulders, and start to run. Won’t be long now before they …
“Oi, Danny!”
Who the hell was that? My heart sinks when I look back and see Adam hopping after me with his ski-pole walking stick, his useless, misshapen, badly broken left foot swinging. I found this poor bastard trapped in his parents’ house a few days back, and I haven’t been able to shake him yet. He can hardly walk, so I could leave him if I wanted to, but I stupidly keep letting my conscience get the better of me. I tell myself that if I get him away from here he’ll be able to kill again, and anyone who’s going to get rid of even one more of the Unchanged has got to be worth saving. I run back, put my arm around his waist, and start dragging him away from the building.
“Thanks, man,” he starts to say. “I thought I—”
“Shut the fuck up and move.”
“Oh, that’s nice. What did I ever—”
“Listen,” I tell him, interrupting him midflow. “They’re coming back.”
I pull him deep into the undergrowth behind the office building. Even over my hurried, rustling footsteps and although the canopy of leaves above us muffles and distorts the sound, I can definitely hear another aircraft approaching. Whatever’s coming this time is larger, louder, and no doubt deadlier than the helicopter that was here before.
Adam yelps as his broken ankle thumps against a low tree stump. I ignore him and keep moving. His leg’s already fucked; a little more damage won’t matter.
“Sounds big,” he says through clenched teeth, trying to distract himself from the pain. I don’t respond, concentrating instead on putting the maximum possible distance between me and the office. Other people run through the trees on either side of me, illuminated by shafts of sunlight that pour through the odd-shaped gaps between leaves, all of them passing us. The noise is increasing, so loud now that I can feel it through the ground. It must be a jet. Christ, what did I do wrong to end up saddled with a cripple at a time like this? Maybe I should just leave him here and let him take his chances? I look up, and through a gap in the trees I catch the briefest glimpse of the plane streaking across the sky at incredible speed, so fast that the noise it makes seems to lag way behind it.
“Keep moving,” I tell him. “Not far enough yet—”
I stop and hit the deck as soon as I hear it: the signature whoosh and roar of missiles being launched. Adam screams in agony as I pull him down, but we’ll be safer on the ground. There’s a moment of silence—less than a second, but it feels like forever—and then the building behind us is destroyed in an immense blast of heat, light, and noise. A gust of hot wind blows through the trees, and then dust and small chunks of decimated masonry begin to fall from the sky, bouncing off the leaves and branches above us, then hitting the ground like hard rain. The thick canopy of green takes the sting out of the granite hailstones. The shower of debris is over as quickly as it began, and now all I can hear is the plane disappearing into the distance and both Adam’s and my own labored breathing. He sits up, struggling with his injuries. Crazy bastard is grinning like an idiot.
“Fuck me,” he says, “that was impressive.”
“Impressive? I could think of other ways to describe it. If you’d been any slower we’d have had it.”
“Whatever.”
He leans back against a tree, still panting heavily. We should keep moving, but the idea of resting is appealing. The Unchanged won’t come back here for a while. Even here in the shade the afternoon heat is stifling, and now that I’ve stopped, I don’t want to start walking again. I give in to temptation and lie back on the ground next to Adam and close my eyes, replaying the memory of today’s kills over and over again.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 86 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(52)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 86 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 3, 2011

    A Great Sequel.

    David Moody has managed to accomplish something that very few others can. He has created an outstanding sequel. This book is equal to if not better than Hater (the 1st book of the series). He has managed to evolve the story of Danny McCoyne, keeping true to the original but he has writen a completely new story. By this, I mean he hasn't just rehashed the original story. This is a sequel that adds a completely new dimension to the story. I loved it.

    The sequel finds Danny a changed man. No longer scared of the present or the future. He is now a Fighter. Fighting for his very exsistance in a world that has gone mad with rage. He will do anything and he will kill anyone to succeed in his new environment. He has set himself a task, he will find his daughter and he will free her from the grasp of the unchanged. To do this Danny must not only fight his enimies but he must deceive his comrades in war. In a world that is split into two armies. Danny must be resourceful and brave to achieve his goals. Luckily for him, he has a few tricks up his sleeve.

    I highly recommend this book to everyone who enjoys a thrilling, terrifying read. This book kept me on the edge of my seat from start to end, just like the first book HATER. Once again, David Moody has proved himself as a leading contender in horror fiction.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 12, 2011

    Wonderful part 2 of Hater Trilogy

    After finishing Hater I was so mad I had to wait almost a year for the 2nd part. Was it ever worth the wait!! Focusing on the protagonist's desire to reunite with his daughter is delivers not only gruesome, graphic infected fighting but also heart. This man has earned top shelf in my library with his ability to make me want to jump out of my chair and shout at a book as if it were a movie!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    Best Book of the Series?

    Questionably my favorite. So much happens in this book, so be sure that you've read Haters first. I ran through this book in about 2 days; so if you love a great dystopic trilogy like I do, pick this up ASAP!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 24, 2012

    Great Read!!

    I loved the first book Hater, this one is just as good. Scary to
    think this could happen on this planet. Read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 19, 2012

    Well done. This is where the series really took off.

    Well done. This is where the series really took off.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    wow

    riveting, brilliant, spooky. this book definetly had me looking over my shoulder.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    intelligent apocalyptic chiller

    The world as we know it no longer exists. The human race is divided into two distinct camps: the Unchanged and the Haters. The latter are people ripped of all social restraints and must kill the Unchanged. Their goal is an Unchanged genocide. The Haters have caused governments to collapse destroying the infrastructure of every nation. They still can think but obsess over killing the Unchanged even family members.

    Danny McCoyne is a Hater who hunts the Unchanged without mercy. His goal is to find his daughter Ellis who was taken away from him when he was knocked unconscious after killing his father-in-law. Before he passed out, he saw her and knows she is just like him. The government has relocated the Unchanged inside cities filled with traps like a medieval fortress. Danny falls in with a group that seeks the same destruction as he does. He learns to control his homicidal impulses so he can enter the city because his Ellis is there.

    This intelligent apocalyptic chiller is a fantastic horror tale that continues the escapades of the Haters, who are a zombie like humanoids. The species cannot control their basic impulse to slaughter the Unchanged though Danny tries as his love for Ellis supersedes his instinct to kill. Though lacking the cautionary theme of its predecessor, but with the same moody dark atmosphere and a strange flicker of paternal love and hope, Dog Blood is a terrific zombie thriller that affirms David Moody as a strong talent.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2014

    When I finished Hater shortly after it came out, I waited with b

    When I finished Hater shortly after it came out, I waited with bated breath for Dog Blood—the back of Hater SAID the sequel would be coming out soon, but it just wasn’t soon enough for me! 
    Dog Blood returns us to the world of the Haters and the Unchanged. Chaos is still unfolding, and Danny is still hot on the trail of his daughter, Ella. This was the storyline that sucked me in the most—I needed him to find his daughter! Danny is now wrestling with the fact that he is a Hater, but, unlike most Haters, he can control the Hate, allowing him to sneak into Unchanged camps and go on missions. But the one thing that still drives him is his daughter. He knows she is a Hater, and he needs to find her. 
    By the time Dog Blood came out, I was in college. I lent Hater to a friend while I read the sequel. I gave her Dog Blood to read, and when she finished, she threw it at my head and shouted, “Why would you do that to me?!” I think that accurately describes David Moody’s writing. You get sucked in; you fall in love with the characters and become wrapped up in this world that’s utter chaos. But David Moody is a realist at heart—he doesn’t coddle his characters. Brutal things happen. Your heart will break (and race!) reading this book. If you like blood, gore, intense action, and biting your nails down to the nub, I definitely recommend Dog Blood. 
    The world of Hater becomes so much more complex in this book—the details that emerge, not only about the setting but about the way the Haters and Unchanged now function, make this book one to remember. It’s the perfect sequel to Hater—it answers just enough questions to satisfy you, but raises even more to keep you guessing. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    To Heatha

    Could you not say that...it affends me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2013

    Idiots, theyre not real dogs

    Dont rate the book badly because of some animal violence. Gods, worse things

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2013

    NEVER READ THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Poor dogs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! WAAAAAAAAAAAAHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ANIMAL ABUSE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Instead of KILLING and HURTING and ABUSING animals save an animals LIFE by adopting donating or volenteering at the humane society or a shelter. HELP ANIMALS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2013

    Destint

    I like the tie

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2013

    Tap me

    HOLY CRAP THAT WAS AN AWESOME yet sad BOOK I LOVED yet i hav to admit i sheded a tear or two OK OK I CRIED OK GOSH DONT JUDGE ME!!!!!!!! Gasp im srry im sick i dont feel good im sorry i snapped at you.
    ~Hetha 11 CA

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    Jenna

    Is it creepy? Tell me

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2012

    Good,exciting at the end

    A good sequel,but a bit slow first half

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2012

    Waaaaaaaa!

    Dont kill puppies!!!!!! Waaaaaaaaaaaaa!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2012

    I love puppies

    Why?!?!?!?!?! :(

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2012

    Stupid people

    I love puppies

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    Joo

    Goog

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2012

    Excellent

    Loved this series!

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 86 Customer Reviews

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