Dog Days - Deadly Passage [NOOK Book]

Overview

JournalStone’s DoubleDown series hits book number 3.

Dog Days: It's the summer of 1983 and the suburbs of Houston are reeling from a disastrous hurricane. But the storm brought more than wind and floodwaters. In the swamps that surround Clear Lake a brutal and possibly supernatural killer is gathering strength, and waiting for the full moon. The focus of his bloodlust is fifteen year old Mark Eckert. Reckless to a fault, with a knack for ...
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Dog Days - Deadly Passage

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Overview

JournalStone’s DoubleDown series hits book number 3.

Dog Days: It's the summer of 1983 and the suburbs of Houston are reeling from a disastrous hurricane. But the storm brought more than wind and floodwaters. In the swamps that surround Clear Lake a brutal and possibly supernatural killer is gathering strength, and waiting for the full moon. The focus of his bloodlust is fifteen year old Mark Eckert. Reckless to a fault, with a knack for making spectacularly bad decisions, Mark had planned to spend that last summer before high school wandering the swamps with his friends and his beloved dog Max. But after a chance encounter with the lunatic, Mark's summer becomes a time of terror and tragedy. With his life on the line, Mark's courage will be tested to his limits and beyond as he struggles to survive the hottest days of summer: the dog days.


Deadly Passage: Just after the American Revolution, the slave ship Lombard sets off from Africa, beginning its brutal passage to the New World. But even this ship’s hardened crew of thugs and drunkards is unprepared for the horrors ahead. When the Lombard’s human cargo dies one by one, free black crewman George Bell suspects a stealthy and devious stowaway — not disease — is the cause. As the death toll mounts and the slaves threaten mutiny, he must choose between his humanity and duty to a callous captain. But Bell doesn’t have much time to make his voyage of self-discovery. The deadly beast burrowing through the rotten guts of the Lombard grows more powerful with each life it takes.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940148948483
  • Publisher: JournalStone
  • Publication date: 12/3/2013
  • Series: DoubleDown , #3
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 222
  • Sales rank: 620,501
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author

Joe McKinney has been a patrol officer for the San Antonio Police Department, a homicide detective, a disaster mitigation specialist, a patrol commander, and a successful novelist. His books include the four part Dead World series, Quarantined, Inheritance, Lost Girl of the Lake, The Savage Dead, Crooked House and Dodging Bullets. His short fiction has been collected in The Red Empire and Other Stories and Dating in Dead World. In 2011, McKinney received the Horror Writers Association's Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel. For more information go to

Sanford Allen, at various times, has worked as a newspaper reporter, a college journalism instructor and a touring musician. He currently divides his creative energy between writing tales of horror, science fiction and dark fantasy and his band Hogbitch, which wallows in the murky swamp between doom metal and space rock. He lives in San Antonio, Texas, with his wife Tracey. This is his first novel. www.sanfordallen.com
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 1, 2014

    Joe McKinney¿s story DOG DAYS from the JournalStone¿s DoubleDown

    Joe McKinney’s story DOG DAYS from the JournalStone’s DoubleDown Series Book III is a very unique story in that it takes the werewolf genre and brings it out with an entirely different mythology. Of course, as much of Joe’s work, it is set in Texas, which if you know me; you know I believe Texas is the greatest State in the Union. Next, Joe’s experience as a police officer also plays a big part of the story. I wish Joe would write a book about his experiences as a patrol officer for the San Antonio Police Department, a homicide detective and a disaster mitigation specialist among his other duties in law enforcement. However, I digress. This story is about the occurrences that follow Hurricane Alexis in Brook Forest Texas, between Galveston and Houston. It follows the lives of Mark Eckert and his father, Houston Police Sergeant Wes Eckert and his mother Meredith, a pediatrician. They also have a dog named Max who also works with the police department. Mark and his friends, who are known for making the best of adolescent immaturity and utilizing immensely bad judgment, become engrossed in some horrific murders of people in the neighborhood by something that is tearing people to death.

    Joe is an incredible author in that he introduces you into the life of his characters and makes you care about what happens to them, through their accomplishments and defeats. He also has a way of slowly increasing the tension until like those shock scenes in the movies you tend to jump in your seat. Each word he chooses is the best word for the situation. There is no wasted time in his stories and DOG DAYS is no exception. He takes this specific genre and makes it his own. This isn’t the old Wolfman stories with Lon Chaney Jr., or the Hammer Studio and Universal tales. Joe uses the lycanthropic story of the beast from history and then surrounds it with modern day locales. Instead of the British Moors, Joe places locale in the swamps around the coastal part of Texas. The creature himself is not the anthropomorphic monster we are used to but more like an outcast of society.

    This is one of the great things about reading Joe McKinney’s works. He takes the mundane and familiar and makes it extraordinary and exotic. DOG DAYS is no exception. This is a novella at 127 pages but then you get to add a story from Sanford Allen, a master craftsman in his own rights and you have a book that will make your nights sweaty and uneasy. Just the reason I read horror!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    This is the second Journstone Doubledown book I have read, and I

    This is the second Journstone Doubledown book I have read, and I enjoyed it almost as much as I did the first. It is great to have 2 distinct stories to read by 2 different authors. I especially liked the Dog Days by Joe McKinney involving some youth who get entangled with a brutal killer fallowing a hurricane. Deadly Paassage by Sanford Allen involves slaves, a deadly beast in the bowels of the ship and a free black crewman who must decide between caring for people and the dream he has of owning property.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 5, 2013

    JournalStone's DoubleDown series, book 3, contains 2 - slightly

    JournalStone's DoubleDown series, book 3, contains 2 - slightly creepy - stories, 'Dog Days' and 'Deadly Passage'.




    Dog Days by Joe KcKinney:
    This story can only be described as 'Coming of age in a horror scenario', or 'A different kind of summer'. It's the summer holidays and a flood has blanked a nondescript southern town. Upon investigation by the local police sergeant a horrific crime scene reveals itself and becomes the fascination of the sergeant's son and his cronies. This crime scene does not remain the only one for long, every full moon a new one appears. The sergeant's son, still under the guilt of having played with his father's service gun, and his father having found out, takes it again and ends the horror once and for all. Sometimes it pays not to listen to your parents.




    Deadly Passage by Sanford Allen:
    A story set back in the times of the slave trades, and some of the characters are still up there in my head. The Goethe quote in the beginning of the book describes the story the best, 'No one is more of a slave, than he who thinks himself free without being so'. A freed slave works on a slave trade ship so as to make enough money for him to marry his sweetheart. The slave ship has taken aboard a stowaway of a different type, and both the slaves and the crew start to mysteriously die, as if the life and blood get sucked out of them. When most are gone and the ship is without a crew and captain, it is the freed slave who returns it to Africa. The story has good descriptions of this shameful period in our past, not central to the story, but a haunting reminder.

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  • Posted December 3, 2013

    This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers. Two ve

    This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
    Two very different books offered in one package. Both are monster stories, but that's where the similarities end. Dog Days involves a young (14) boy, a few of his friends, and his dad who is larger than life in the eyes of his son. A fast moving story, a bit predictable but overall good. Deadly Passage's monster stows away on a slave ship making its way across the ocean. The monster is nothing compared to the vile descriptions of the way people can treat other human beings. I found myself several times not wanting to continue because of the ghastly details of life on board this ship. If you want to feel rotten about humans as a race, this book is for you.  I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.  

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