Dog in Action

Overview

Written In 1950, The Dog In Action was the first book to thoroughly analyze, illustrate and explain the under-the-skin workings of the dog. Whether looking at a Pom or Pointer, McDowell Lyon showed the dog breeder, fancier and judge that the principles of movement applied to all. The Dog In Action has inspired generations of dog breeders and judges to watch more carefully, to put aside preconceived notions of how the dog "should" work and to learn from what their eyes tell them. While some of Lyon's theories have...
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Overview

Written In 1950, The Dog In Action was the first book to thoroughly analyze, illustrate and explain the under-the-skin workings of the dog. Whether looking at a Pom or Pointer, McDowell Lyon showed the dog breeder, fancier and judge that the principles of movement applied to all. The Dog In Action has inspired generations of dog breeders and judges to watch more carefully, to put aside preconceived notions of how the dog "should" work and to learn from what their eyes tell them. While some of Lyon's theories have since been disproved, the book still deserves to be in the serious dog person's library because it is the foundation for all gait and locomotion books which have since been written.
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Editorial Reviews

George Alston Handling Seminars and author of Winning Edge, Show Ring Secrets - George G. Alston
The Dog in Action is the finest technical book on dog movement ever written! With each reading you learn something new and profound. The more dog-knowledge you have, the more you will glean from the material.
author of Basenji Stacked and Moving, You Be the Judge and illustrator of Dog Locomotion and Gait Analysis - Robert W. Cole
The wondrous thing about McDowell Lyon’s book on The Dog in Action is that, although the subject is technical, it reads like a well-written mystery novel. (It) has something to say to each successive generation of dog fanciers and will forever remain the traditional introduction to the study of the moving dog.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780876054680
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/1/1950
  • Pages: 304

Meet the Author

Author, McDowell Lyon, had an artist’s eye and an engineer’s mind. Growing up around horses and hunting and working dogs developed his skill to evaluate movement and structure. Lyon had a colorful life ranging from WW1 fighter pilot to writer for the Hearst Newspapers covering the Mexican Revolution to dog editor for Outdoor Life magazine. The Dog in Action is his legacy to the world of dogs.
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Table of Contents

Introduction xiii
1. Dog Engineers 1
Standards are specifications to be studied
A dog's best features stem from his origin and purpose
The principles of locomotion are identical in all breeds
2. Dogs as We Have Made Them 13
How qualities are produced
The promulgators of standards were interested primarily in working ability
Dogs are the same today, their variations being only superficial
3. Conformation 26
The parts must fit
Static and kinetic conformation
Symmetry and balance
Importance of comparative angulation
Body length, depth, station
The relative phase of measurement
4. The Dog's Slow Gaits 39
The meaning of stride, suspension, timing, sequence and the diagonals
The walk, the trot, the flying trot and the pace; their relative speed and fatigue factors
5. The Dog's Fast Gaits 53
The sustained gallop or canter; the normal gallop; the leaping style gallop
The arched back and the rearing muscles
Speed of other animals compared
6. Locomotion 64
Movement as controlled falling
The center of gravity
Instability creates power and speed
Weight distribution and the laws of leverage
How the draft dog pushes the load
7. Lateral Displacement 81
How the dog combats lateral displacement
Single tracking, and the significance of moving too close
Deformities may be mechanical advantages
An experiment in balance
8. Applied Anatomy 98
The body skeleton
Brain size in relation to intelligence
Similarity of the human and canine skeleton
Bone size and quality
Bone and its bearing upon disposition
9. The Muscles in Use 113
Muscle function
Heavy muscles for strength, lighter muscles for agility and endurance
Muscles of head, neck, shoulder, diaphragm, stifle and hock
Muscle tone
10. The Shoulder Blade 128
The forehand assembly has many missions
The loaded shoulder
The 60 versus the 45-degree blade
Effect of the upright shoulder on gait
Leverage and stride
Padding and pounding
11. Balanced Fronts 145
Static and kinetic balance
Power as derived from extension
Advantage of the long upper arm
The efficient pastern
Cat-foot and hare-foot; the length of their digits
Pads, dewclaws
12. Special Fronts 160
The straight terrier front
Mechanical advantage of the short upper arm
Low center of gravity fronts, their massive bone and large pads
Barrel bodies
The racing front
13. Balance Coming and Going 173
Static balance in front
Rib curve and its effect on the angle of the shoulder blade
The curved forearm
Speed and single tracking
Static balance in back
Flexibility of leg action
Interference
14. The Back Leg 189
Force of the back leg and how it is transmitted
The croup--sloping, steep, flat
Lengthening the thigh muscles
Value of the well bent stifle
Advantage and disadvantage of hocks let down
15. The Spinal Column 207
The link between the front and rear assemblies; its anatomical divisions
Head and neck, withers and back
Arched loin and sway back
The racing Greyhound back line
Croup and tail
16. The Body 227
The thorax or rib section
The diaphragm
Rib quality
How the ribs actually work
Body depth
Herring gut and tuck-up
The abdominal section
17. Dentition 239
The temporary teeth, their replacement
The permanent set; number, eruption and position
The bite--level, scissors, overshot, undershot
Normal wear; tartar and discoloration
Distemper teeth
18. Applying the Facts 247
Workers on fur and feather; rangers, springers, retrievers
The swimmers
Scent trailers, gazehounds and dogs that go to ground
Whippet racing
Sheep and cattle dogs
Toys and companion dogs
Glossary 267
Index 281
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