Dog Jack

Dog Jack

5.0 2
by Florence W. Biros
     
 

A stray mongrel dog, wandered into a Pittsburgh fire station and became the mascot that went with the men of the 102nd regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteers and became a civil war hero. His picture hangs on the wall of the Soldiers Musuem in Pittsburgh. It includes a 14 page "living History Gallery" (actual photos of the reenactment of the 125th anniversary at

Overview

A stray mongrel dog, wandered into a Pittsburgh fire station and became the mascot that went with the men of the 102nd regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteers and became a civil war hero. His picture hangs on the wall of the Soldiers Musuem in Pittsburgh. It includes a 14 page "living History Gallery" (actual photos of the reenactment of the 125th anniversary at Gettysburg) and other pictures throughout the book. The family feature film, "Dog Jack" will be released in late 2007.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780936369471
Publisher:
Son-Rise Publications & Distribution Company
Publication date:
05/28/1999
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
180
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
10 Years

Meet the Author

Florence Biros is the author of Dog Jack. She has written many books on great American heros. Dog Jack has become her favorite book among readers world wide.

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Dog Jack 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
This heartwarming story of a runaway slave and his best friend begins in 1861 at Pittsburgh, PA, with the fourteen-year-old ex-slave, named Jed, working as stable boy for the Fifth Avenue Fire House. A stray dog which he names Dog Jack becomes the firehouse mascot and Jed's pet. Next, it goes back to give an account of Jed's escape from slavery, then continues to tell how that when the men all volunteered to join the 102nd Pennsylvania Volunteers Dog Jack became a major part of their Civil War regiment. During the long marches and the battles the dog endeared himself to the men so much that they refused medical assistance for themselves until their wounded loyal mascot was given treatment. At one point the dog became a prisoner of war. For six months he was incarcerated at Belle Isle, VA, after being captured at Salem Church, VA, and was actually exchanged for a Confederate soldier. Several years ago, author Florence W. Biros found a huge portrait of the dog hanging on the walls of the Allegheny County Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Pittsburgh. Inspired by this awesome bit of history, she incorporated it in a novel about the dog, the runaway slave boy, and the real-life army chaplain, A. M. Stewart (who is referred to as "Reverend" quite frequently). He told about the dog in his memoir Camp, March and Battlefield. Biros wrote, "Jed, the slave boy, Matt, the fireman, and many of the circumstances are fictionalized. However, the war, the dog, and the chaplain are authentic, as are many of the facts as possible." In fact, there is a note, "Any terminology within the pages of this book is used to make Dog Jack's Civil War story as historically accurate as possible." There are accounts of actual battles such as Savage Station, Malvern Hill, and Salem Heights. We did this as a family read aloud and everyone loved it. Looking to God for guidance and protection is emphasized throughout. There is nothing inappropriate. The 2001 edition contains photographs from a 1988 reenactment of the Battle of Gettysburg. The book was made into a movie in 2009. Biros has written somewhat of a sequel called Christopher Fox.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was an awsome book. I loved it from start to finish.It was really cool if like the Civil War. Its what what got me hooked on the Civil War. READ IT TODAY.