Dog Loves Drawing

( 1 )

Overview

Dog loves books, but one day he receives a strange one in the mail—it's blank! Soon, Dog realizes that this book is not for reading, but for drawing. Before long, Dog is doodling and drawing himself into a new world, full of friends and surprises.

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Overview

Dog loves books, but one day he receives a strange one in the mail—it's blank! Soon, Dog realizes that this book is not for reading, but for drawing. Before long, Dog is doodling and drawing himself into a new world, full of friends and surprises.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this follow-up to Squish Rabbit, the titular bunny—picture a white balloon animal with a chunky black outline—has a few fears, including storms and chickens. But when his squirrel friend, Twitch, goes missing, Squish faces his greatest fear of all: the dark. Battersby has gentle fun with Squish’s fears (“Squish worried that Twitch was trapped... in the dark... in a storm... with a chicken”) without invalidating or demeaning them. She creates expressive characters with minimalistic lines, and Squish’s world is a delightful collage of felt trees, giant chickens (made from yellow feathers), and torn-paper landscapes. Ages 3–5. Agent: Catherine Drayton, Inkwell Management. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
In an earlier book, Dog Loves Books, readers learn that Dog loves books so much that he opens a bookstore. Now, Dog returns and in this story, he receives a package containing a blank book from his Aunt Dora. The book has no words or pictures on the pages. Dog gathers his supplies of pens, pencils, and brushes and begins to draw his own adventure somewhat like the story, Harold and the Purple Crayon. Dog draws a stickman who joins in on the drawing and the twosome adds more characters (i.e. a duck, an owl, and a crab) and colors the pictures. Dog and his new friends are having fun drawing their adventures—such as riding on a train and sailing on a boat—until the mischievous duck draws a monster that chases everyone on the island. Find out how Dog resolves the dilemma. The story may inspire young children to draw and tell their own pictorial, adventure stories like Dog. Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung
Kirkus Reviews
Crockett Johnson's Harold and Purple Crayon (1955) is a fruitful progenitor, and this descendent gleefully incorporates three distinct visual styles. Dog's enthusiasm hasn't diminished since he opened his bookstore in Dog Loves Books (2010). He leans down from a ladder, handing a book to a customer, then perches atop a stack of books while reading a book with a book open on top of his head. One floppy ear pokes out, and his face shows bliss. The visual style is mild and happy, with black sketched lines deftly conveying emotion and soft colors filling them in. Then a parcel arrives containing a blank sketchbook, and everything changes. Dog draws a door, steps through it and draws a stickman for company in that blank-paged world. Lickety-split, Dog and the stickman are doodle-creating squiggles and more characters (duck, crab, owl). Adventures ensue: train and boat rides, a desert island, a scary monster and a mad dash home. Three aesthetics mingle: the gentle black lines of Dog himself, with his bookstore's watery colors; a doodling style inside the sketchbook-world, which, though less visually interesting, is sweetly childlike; and a lusciously realistic portrayal of art supplies. Never have pencils, brushes and even a pencil sharpener beckoned so temptingly, from opening endpapers to closing (make sure to check both). Dog makes it easy to share his passions. (Picture book. 3-7)
The New York Times Book Review
Yates's spontaneous splotches mingle with scribbles and expertly painted forms…Children encountering this picture book will experience rich quotations of imagery either previously known or soon to be encountered, forging a network of connections. They may even be inspired to draw their own worlds, to enter and exit with joie de vivre.
—Ellen Handler Spitz
From the Publisher
Starred Review, School Library Journal, June 2012:
“This book will inspire and entertain young artists and fun-loving readers alike.”
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
The delightful hero of Dog Loves Books returns in a new and intriguing tale. The book lover is surprised to receive a package one day containing a book with no words and no pictures. Inside, a note from his Aunt Dora encourages him to draw an open door to "some wonderful adventures." After laying out his pens, brushes, and pencils, Dog draws that door. Stepping through it, he draws a simple stickman. The stickman draws a duck that draws an owl that draws a crab. Soon they are all drawing, coloring, and spilling over onto the next page. There they draw a train, get on board, and travel until the stickman draws a stop sign. Next they go sailing on a drawn boat to an island; then duck draws a menacing monster. Dog draws a door he can duck through safely back to the bookstore and makes sure his friends are all safe as well. A thank you note to Aunt Dora for the adventure is his next job. There is a charming spontaneity to the child-like drawings created with pencil and watercolor by the more realistically visualized Dog. The gang produces isolated objects with the exception of several pages of ocean. But they react to each as if it were alive, even the big-eyed, clumsy monster. The book's example of casual creativity might encourage readers to try visualizing their own imagined adventures.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—In this follow-up to the adorable Dog Loves Books (Knopf, 2010), the pup receives a blank book as a gift. He quickly realizes that it's a sketchbook, and though initially struck by artist's block, he soon uses his pencils and pens to draw himself some friends, a boat and a train to ride, and food for them to feast on, all of which magically come to life on the page. When one of Dog's new friends draws a monster, though, Dog must quickly use his skills to contain it and create an escape route. While the drawing-comes-to-life conceit is commonly explored in picture books, Yates takes the concept and targets a younger audience to great effect. All of Dog's drawings, from friends to food, look like those of a child, while her depiction of Dog maintains his characteristic style, and illustrations of his tools are more sophisticated. The addition of the monster amps up the action and suspense without turning the story into a truly scary one, making this an adventure for all. This book will inspire and entertain young artists and fun-loving readers alike.—Heather Talty, formerly at Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School, New York City
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375870675
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 8/14/2012
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 418,262
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD600L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.60 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

LOUISE YATES began drawing pictures to go with the stories she wrote for school and, at a young age, began telling people that she wanted to be a children's book illustrator. She studied English at Oxford University, and currently attends The Prince's Drawing School. She lives in London and is at work on more picture books.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2012

    Unik

    He padded in.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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