Dog Prince

Dog Prince

by Lauren A. Mills, Dennis Nolan
     
 
A handsome but spoiled prince, feeling that his royal life is dull, decides to challenge himself by hunting the monstrous chimera. On his journey, his rudeness and arrogance offend a faery, who turns him into a hound dog as punishment. Afterward, the gentle kindness of a poor goat girl named Eliza, the dog prince fights to save her-and discovers that she can save

Overview

A handsome but spoiled prince, feeling that his royal life is dull, decides to challenge himself by hunting the monstrous chimera. On his journey, his rudeness and arrogance offend a faery, who turns him into a hound dog as punishment. Afterward, the gentle kindness of a poor goat girl named Eliza, the dog prince fights to save her-and discovers that she can save him, too.

Author Biography: Lauren Mills and Dennis Nolan received their master's degrees from San Jose State University in California. They studied sculpture at the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts in Connecticut. They live with their daughter in Willamsburg, Massachusetts.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The husband-and-wife collaborators behind Fairy Wings and The Rag Coat begin their tale with a prince "bored by his devoted people, bored by his elegant castle, bored by his perfect garden, his fancy meals, his royal clothes." In the artwork, drafted and tinted in homage to classic 19th-century children's illustration, the young royal reclines in his carriage, an effete, heavy-lidded creature. On his way to hunt the monster chimera, he orders townspeople cleared from his path, then taunts a poor goat girl named Eliza. Transformed into a homely bloodhound by a wizened old woman, a faery who objects to his haughtiness, the dog prince finds himself befriended by the girl he had scorned. She names him, whimsically, Prince. He serves Eliza with chivalric devotion, defeats the chimera and, suitably chastened, returns to his human form. Older readers will be gratified by fairy-tale scenes with lots of action, unusual depth and earnest internal dialogue "She had opened his heart, but what good was an open heart to him now, locked inside a dog's body?" The supporting characters may be stock figures from the fairy-tale repertoire, but the hound Prince, contrite and liquid-eyed as he serves his penance, lends the story heartfelt charm. Ages 6-8. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
The prince, caught up with himself, incites the ire of a fairy, who casts a spell on him, turning him into a bloodhound. This makes him depressed and sad, until a goat girl finds him. Eliza, the goat girl, takes the prince home and teaches him trust, love, and loyalty. One night, he saves the goat, which leads Eliza to kiss him on the head, in turn, breaking the spell. The bloodhound turns back into the prince, he proposes to Eliza, and they get married. This is a refreshing fairy tale with beautiful pictures that portray the setting and characters with much detail, while the colors are very mute. The faces of the characters in the book look realistic, which helps in relating to the story. This book makes the reader want to keep reading to find out what happens next to the prince. This is an inspirational fairy tale; one that shows that there is good in everyone and it is a pleasure to read. 2001, Little Brown and Company, Ages 4 to 8.
—Danielle Wilkinson
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Romance, danger, magic, even humor-this original fairy tale provides them all. Employing the classic "pride goeth before a fall" motif, the story introduces a haughty prince whose rudeness to a goat girl and a faery brings about his transformation into a hound dog. Rejected by the townsfolk and palace personnel, the hungry animal is taken in by the friendly (and lovely) goat girl, who names him, ironically and unwittingly, "Prince." More changes are forthcoming as she teaches him some manners, and he comes to enjoy her companionship. His mettle is tested when the chimera threatens the flock. In a Beauty-and-the-Beast-like conclusion (with some tongue-in-cheek touches), all ends happily. As in Mills and Nolan's Fairy Wings (Little, Brown, 1995), the watercolors depict marvelously expressive humans and animals. Soft backgrounds shimmer with elfin surprises and classical details. A charmer.-Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Disguised but recognizable elements from several fairy tales give this romantic episode a faintly arch undertone. An arrogant but extremely handsome prince is transformed into a floppy-skinned bloodhound after making the mistake of annoying an old woman who happens to be a fairy. Soon he finds himself reduced to eating garbage and sleeping under a bush, until Eliza, a beautiful, kind-hearted goat girl with "eyes that are like a chimera's"-whatever that means-takes him in, dubbing him "Prince," and teaching him a bit of discipline. He falls in love, and is able to show his devotion at last by saving her from a rampaging chimera of the lion-headed sort. As he lies dying in her lap, she kisses him, thus breaking the spell and paving the way for a quick marriage and a life together-not in the palace, but in the hills with the goats. The pale, formal illustrations play it straight, depicting elegantly posed figures in elaborately embroidered Renaissance costume (except for the prince in his four-legged incarnation, of course). Though the telling is often stiff and somewhat forced, this is a pretty tale, equally suitable for fans of conventional romance or fairy tale pastiches. (Picture book. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316574174
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
10/01/2001
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.89(w) x 11.32(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

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