Dolci di Love: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

New from the author of House of Daughters- an irresistible confection of love, loss, and Italian sweets in the delectable tradition of Chocolat

Corporate star Lily Turner abandons the boardrooms of Manhattan for the steep streets of Montevedova when she discovers her "perfect" husband, Daniel, has another family tucked away in the hills of Tuscany. Once there, her plight attracts the attention of the Secret League of Widowed Darners, an ...
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Dolci di Love: A Novel

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Overview

New from the author of House of Daughters- an irresistible confection of love, loss, and Italian sweets in the delectable tradition of Chocolat

Corporate star Lily Turner abandons the boardrooms of Manhattan for the steep streets of Montevedova when she discovers her "perfect" husband, Daniel, has another family tucked away in the hills of Tuscany. Once there, her plight attracts the attention of the Secret League of Widowed Darners, an all-but-invisible army pulling strings behind the scenes to create happy endings. Soon founding members, Violetta and Luciana, are scheming to mend Lily's broken heart-and to enlist her help for their struggling pasticceria.

With the lush landscape of a sumptuous Tuscan summer in the background, and the tantalizing scent of fresh-baked cantucci in the air, Dolci di Love is the joyful celebration of a modern recipe for life.

Read Sarah-Kate Lynch's blogs and other content on the Penguin Community.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
After New York executive Lily Turner discovers a photo of a beautiful woman and two children, clearly taken in Italy, she realizes that her husband, Daniel, has a secret second family. The blow is doubly painful since Lily and Daniel are childless. In a drunken impulse, Lily tracks Daniel via Internet to the Tuscan village of Montevedova and books a ticket. After a few comical moments of culture shock, Lily finds accommodation above a bakery run by two elderly sisters. Unbeknownst to Lily, the bakery harbors the Secret League of Widowed Darners. Originally founded as a sewing circle in the 1940s, the band of lively widows quickly discovered that mending broken hearts was much more useful (and more fun) than mending socks. Lily becomes their new project: perfect, they decide, for wealthy, handsome widower Alessandro. Sparks fly, but Lily's feelings for Daniel are still unresolved when a chance meeting with Daniel's precocious six-year-old daughter complicates things: Lily falls in love with the little girl. She's also in love with the bakery and Tuscany by the time she finds Daniel. Although there are no huge plot surprises, Lynch's (House of Daughters) Tuscany is lovingly rendered and populated with characters whose vitality is contagious in this perfect combo of travel and romance . (May)
Library Journal
When Lily discovers a photograph (in his golf shoe, of all places) of her husband, another woman, and two children, she realizes he's been living a dual life. Turns out he has another family—in Italy—so Lily decides to head over there to see what's up. She ends up in Tuscany under the care of eccentric old widows, who make it their business to fix affairs of the heart. This quaint, charming novel by the author of House of Daughters and By Bread Alone will appeal to readers who enjoy their summer fiction set in romantic locations.
Kirkus Reviews - Kikus Reviews
A betrayed wife collides with two biscuit-baking, elderly Italian sisters who double as matchmakers in a bumpy romantic fantasy.

Even adultery can lead to happiness, suggests Lynch (House of Daughters, 2008, etc.) in her off-balance tale combining whimsy, sadness, tragedy and farce. When hyper-efficient wife and corporate hotshot Lily Turner discovers a photograph in her husband Daniel's closet revealing he has another family in Italy, she is forced to realize her 16-year-old marriage has been drained of magic by the unhappiness arising from her five miscarriages and a failed adoption. The daughter of an abusive alcoholic mother, Lily has also started drinking and, during a binge, books a flight to Rome to track Daniel down in the Tuscan village of Montevedova. Here she encounters Violetta and Luciana, the cantucci-baking founders of the Secret League of Widowed Darners, which matches up lonely hearts. Lily, earmarked for a handsome widower, is also befriended by Francesca, Daniel's illegitimate daughter who is going through an unhappy childhood similar to Lily's. Other parallels abound: pairs of sisters, melancholy men folk, adulterous offspring. In a credulity-expanding conclusion, Italian clichés are reasserted and broken hearts mended.

An atypical, sometimes awkward (see the title) version of chick lit which cheerily proposes that two wrongs can make a right.

Kirkus Reviews
A betrayed wife collides with two biscuit-baking, elderly Italian sisters who double as matchmakers in a bumpy romantic fantasy.

Even adultery can lead to happiness, suggests Lynch (House of Daughters, 2008, etc.) in her off-balance tale combining whimsy, sadness, tragedy and farce. When hyper-efficient wife and corporate hotshot Lily Turner discovers a photograph in her husband Daniel's closet revealing he has another family in Italy, she is forced to realize her 16-year-old marriage has been drained of magic by the unhappiness arising from her five miscarriages and a failed adoption. The daughter of an abusive alcoholic mother, Lily has also started drinking and, during a binge, books a flight to Rome to track Daniel down in the Tuscan village of Montevedova. Here she encounters Violetta and Luciana, the cantucci-baking founders of the Secret League of Widowed Darners, which matches up lonely hearts. Lily, earmarked for a handsome widower, is also befriended by Francesca, Daniel's illegitimate daughter who is going through an unhappy childhood similar to Lily's. Other parallels abound: pairs of sisters, melancholy men folk, adulterous offspring. In a credulity-expanding conclusion, Italian clichés are reasserted and broken hearts mended.

An atypical, sometimes awkward (see the title) version of chick lit which cheerily proposes that two wrongs can make a right.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101513439
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/29/2011
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 307,064
  • File size: 369 KB

Meet the Author

Sarah-Kate Ly nch lives par t of the year on the wild west coast of New Zealand but travels as often as she can to the vineyards of Champagne, the streets of New York, and the hilltop towns of Tuscany.

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Reading Group Guide

INTRODUCTION

Lily Turner is a successful New York executive whose life is running according to her plan. She has the apartment she has always envisioned, the job at which she shines, and the marriage that everyone labels "perfect." The only missing element in her otherwise ideal life is the thing for which she most yearns: a child.

Upon learning that her husband, Daniel, has a secret family in Tuscany, Lily travels to the sleepy town of Montevedova, Italy, to confront him. With the help of a collection of nonagenarian matchmakers called the Secret League of Widowed Darners, she discovers the truth about her husband's infidelity, redefines the concept of family, and finds a way to mend her broken heart.

Dolci di Love is a novel about loss and its effect on our relationships; about letting go of our past heartaches to embrace the new dreams that emerge; and about, simply, love.

ABOUT SARAH-KATE LYNCH

Sarah-Kate Lynch lives part of the year on the wild west coast of New Zealand but travels as often as she can to the vineyards of Champagne, the streets of New York, and the hilltop towns of Tuscany.

A CONVERSATION WITH SARAH-KATE LYNCH

Q. This story takes place mostly in Tuscany. What challenges did you face in constructing Montevedova? How important was this setting to your story?

Actually I faced very few challenges in constructing Montevedova because it is pretty much the existing town of Montepulciano! I discovered this medieval hilltop jewel on vacation with my husband and knew it was the perfect setting for a book because it looked like something out of a fairytale. I went back when I was halfway through the book and spent some more time there so felt I got to know it pretty well. There is a café called Poliziano, and a beautiful church called San Biagio, and a wonderful grand piazza—although I'm not the first person to discover that: it features in the second Twilight movie. Setting is always very important to me because I want to create a world that the reader feels happy "visiting". With Montevedova, the aim was to present Lily with the staggering beauty of Tuscany, a place she'd never particularly wanted to visit, to arouse a little awe in her surroundings… the beginning of the thaw for her frozen emotions.

Q. Dolci di Love boasts many colorful characters. What elements do you feel are most important in constructing a character? Which character did you have most fun writing about?

Developing a main character is a pretty serious proposition. You basically start from scratch, with them as a baby, and imagine everything upwards from there. Very little of this background ends up in the book but it's how you, as an author, get to know them. My characters don't land in my lap fully formed—they reveal themselves as the book progresses. Sometimes not fast enough. Indeed, sometimes I even interview them to speed up the discovery process! Knowing all there is to know about your character means you can make the right decisions for them when obstacles are placed in their way which will hopefully given them credibility. Credibility—even in a story that has more than just a little quirkiness—is essential. I loved inventing Violetta because she's a complicated, slightly magical person, and you can never have enough of those. But Fiorella Fiorucci was hands-down the bees' knees for me to write. She appeared on the page out of absolutely nowhere one day and changed the whole tone of the book. I love her to bits.

Q. In your acknowledgements, you thank a friend who experienced the loss of a child, reflected in your book by Lily's loss of Baby Grace. What drew you to this story? What difficulties did you face in incorporating this story in your book?

I arrived in New York for a month-long stay just days after a close friend had had to give back the baby boy she was in the process of adopting. I was privy to a lot of her grief and it just tore me in two. We were walking through Soho one afternoon and a new mother with a baby in a sling walked past and my friend stopped what she was saying and started to cry. I've witnessed a few shattered dreams in my time but her heartbreak was overwhelming. In subsequent years, I've observed more and more of my friends struggling with infertility—it's a hot potato when you're in your 40s, let me tell you. This was definitely a theme I wanted to explore, but my friend's experience of handing a baby back in a lawyer's office, then driving away with nothing but an empty car seat is the image that was seared in my mind. It's the moment when Lily's heart starts to harden, so it was never hard to incorporate it into the story. In some ways, it's where the story begins. The only difficulty, I suppose, was asking her if I could use her story as the last thing I wanted to do was upset her. I asked her before I even started the book, and was prepared to come up with another scenario, but actually she's a journalist and had just written a first hand account of her experience so was fine with it. I know the acknowledgment made her cry! A better sort of crying I think. Her story has a happy ending because later that same year she did adopt a little girl who is a complete and utter delight, not the least because she mis-heard my name once and thinks I'm called Fairy-Cake!

Q. "Love" has a host of meanings throughout this book. What ideas about love did you want your readers to come away with? Which themes did you find most challenging?

I guess I want readers to see that love isn't black and white. It isn't perfect. You can love someone and still hurt them—on purpose or, worse in some ways, by mistake—and it doesn't mean the love isn't still there, it just means you've really messed it up and something needs to change if you want to get it back, or you need to reconfigure it into something new. One of the major themes that runs through the book is recognizing the need to adapt to changed circumstances. In the pursuit of happiness, Lily needs to adapt her idea of what the dream family is, Violetta needs to accept the limitations of ageing, and even the cantucci has to smarten up to remain relevant to the times. More challenging was the theme of forgiveness. Would I forgive my husband if he did what Daniel did? Well, for a start, I've told my husband I have planted a computer chip in his neck and if he goes to Tuscany and starts a secret family I will blow him to smithereens with just the press of a button. But if that malfunctioned and I went and found what Lily found, about him and about herself and the reality of life in general, I would give him a second chance. All the same, I hope he's not reading this.

Q. What are you working on now?

I'm so over doom and gloom at the moment and the book I am working on now definitely reflects that. It's like playing with a ray of sunshine! My main character is a southern belle called Sugar in her late 30s who has rather mysteriously turned up in Manhattan with nothing but a birdbath and a hive of bees, which she keeps on the rooftop of her apartment building. Part Mary Poppins, part Samantha from Bewitched crossed with a little Dolly Parton, she uses honey and good manners to help and heal everyone around her but when she falls in love for the first time in 16 years, it's she who's in need of fixing. Only now, she needs more than honey. (OK, so there's a cloud or two on the horizon.) Sugar is emerging as the warmest, funniest, most delicious character and I can't wait to see where she's taking me.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  • Who is Lily Turner? How would you describe her life and career at the beginning of the book? How does who she is inform her personal relationships?
  • Lily's desire to become a mother colors a lot of what she does and who she is. How do you feel about her situation? How has her childlessness affected her over time?
  • What is your impression of the Secret League of Widowed Darners? What role do they play in this story? What kind of atmosphere does the League add to the book?
  • The idea of fate plays a big role in Dolci di Love. What are your beliefs about fate and what role do you see it playing in love and relationships?
  • The majority of this book's action takes place in Tuscany. How does the location affect Lily? How would this story have been different if Lily remained in New York?
  • During one of his discussions with Lily, Alessandro stresses the importance of tradition, saying, "it is our traditions that make us different." How do you feel about this sentiment? How does the idea of tradition in Italy differ from the idea of tradition in America?
  • After Luciana's accident, Violetta expresses her fear of "not being wanted, of not being useful, of not being here." How does that fear inform Violetta's actions? How does this fear apply to other characters in the book?
  • Lily and Rose had a troubled relationship with their mother. How did that relationship affect their characters? What role does this relationship play in Lily's desire to be a mother?
  • What is your opinion of Daniel? Which aspects of his character can you relate to? How would you have approached his unfaithfulness?
  • What function does Fiorella serve in the dynamic of the League of Widowed Darners? How does she change the League and what sort of future do you see for both the League and its purpose?
  • Lily calls her brief affair with Alessandro "a mistake. A very nice mistake. But still a mistake." How do you compare Lily's affair with Daniel's? Are they different? What impact do both of these affairs have on their relationship?
  • Love is a powerful notion throughout this book. How does each of the characters define love? How does this book challenge your notion of love, if at all? What future do you see for Lily and Daniel?
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 12 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 28, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    A delight!

    The Tuscany setting alone is pure magic and then the beautiful, charming storyline is just a delight. Lily stumbles onto a photo of a beautiful woman and two children: the natural conclusion of a wife is that her perfect husband is a bigamist. Off to Tuscany for further investigation leads to such excitement for the reader that I intend to read this again.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This is a warm how to mend a broken heart contemporary tale

    In New York, business executive Lily Turner is stunned when she finds a photograph of a beautiful woman and two children. She concludes her perfect husband Daniel has a second family tucked away in Tuscany while she is childless.

    Determined to confront Daniel and fueled by alcohol, Lily uses the internet to ascertain that Daniel's secret other life is in Montevedova, Tuscany. She flies to Italy to confront her bigamist spouse. In Tuscan, the elderly sisters Violetta and Luciana give her a room above the bakery while also involving their peers in the Secret League of Widowed Darners who knit broken hearts with Lily their new client unbeknownst to the American. They feel she is perfect for Widower Alessandro who needs a good woman to mend his hurting heart. While failing to find Daniel, she meets his six years old daughter and easily falls in love with the child as if she was her mother and finds herself relishing a longer stay in Tuscany.

    This is a warm how to mend a broken heart (Bee-Gees) contemporary tale that stars a hurt New Yorker and a strong Tuscan ensemble cast; ironically Daniel is off page more than on as he and his wife encounter one another late into the story line. Although an urbanite turning into a "rustic" has been used often, (see Summer in Tuscany by Elizabeth Adler starring a New Yorker), fans will enjoy this charming novel as the smell of the bakery fills the pages.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    A disappointment

    Found this to be dull and predictable.

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